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Corporate Bonds
 
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Build your investment knowledge about corporate bonds and why they are issued, along with the different risks and benefits that are involved with secured and unsecured corporate bonds. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 58338 Zions TV
Bond Investing : Why Do Companies Issue Bonds?
 
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Companies issue bonds to raise money to buy equipment, to retool, to remodel buildings and to expand. Find out when a person can expect to get their money back from a company-issued bond with help from a licensed financial planner in this free video on bonds and investing. Expert: William Rae Contact: www.hbwfl.com Bio: William Rae has been licensed in the insurance and financial fields for more than 30 years. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz
Views: 1923 ehowfinance
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 566298 Khan Academy
Stock dilution | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why the value per share does not really get diluted when more shares are issued in a secondary offering. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/mergers-acquisitions/v/acquisitions-with-shares?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/chapter-11-bankruptcy-restructuring?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: When companies issue new shares, many people consider this a share "dilution"--implying that the value of each share has been "watered down" a bit. This tutorial walks through the mechanics and why--assuming management isn't doing something stupid--the shares might not be diluted at all. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 104650 Khan Academy
What is a Bond? Introduction to Bonds | Definition of Corporate Bonds & Govt Bonds with Examples
 
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Introduction to Bonds - A bond is a fixed income investment in which an investor loans money to an entity (typically corporate or governmental) which borrows the funds for a defined period of time at a variable or fixed interest rate. Bonds are used by companies, municipalities, states and sovereign governments to raise money and finance a variety of projects and activities. Owners of bonds are debtholders, or creditors, of the issuer. Yadnya Book - 108 Questions & Answers on Mutual Funds & SIP - Available here: Amazon: https://goo.gl/WCq89k Flipkart: https://goo.gl/tCs2nR Infibeam: https://goo.gl/acMn7j Notionpress: https://goo.gl/REq6To Find us on Social Media and stay connected: Facebook Page - https://www.facebook.com/InvestYadnya Facebook Group - https://goo.gl/y57Qcr Twitter - https://www.twitter.com/InvestYadnya
What is a Bond | by Wall Street Survivor
 
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What is a bond? Learn more at: https://www.wallstreetsurvivor.com A bond is a debt investment in which an investor loans money to a corporate entity or government. The funds are borrowed for a defined period of time at either a variable or fixed interest rate. If you want a guaranteed money-maker, bonds are a much safer option than most. There are many times of bonds, however, and each type has a different risk level. Unlike stocks, which are equity instruments, bonds are debt instruments. When bonds are first issued by the company, the investor/lender typically gives the company $1,000 and the company promises to pay the investor/lender a certain interest rate every year (called the Coupon Rate), AND, repay the $1,000 loan when the bond matures (called the Maturity Date). For example, GE could issue a 30 year bond with a 5% coupon. The investor/lender gives GE $1,000 and every year the lender receives $50 from GE, and at the end of 30 years the investor/ lender gets his $1,000 back. Bonds di er from stocks in that they have a stated earnings rate and will provide a regular cash flow, in the form of the coupon payments to the bondholders. This cash flow contributes to the value and price of the bond and affects the true yield (earnings rate) bondholders receive. There are no such promises associated with common stock ownership. After a bond has been issued directly by the company, the bond then trades on the exchanges. As supply and demand forces start to take effect the price of the bond changes from its initial $1,000 face value. On the date the GE bond was issued, a 5% return was acceptable given the risk of GE. But if interest rates go up and that 5% return becomes unacceptable, the price of the GE bond will drop below $1,000 so that the effective yield will be higher than the 5% Coupon Rate. Conversely, if interest rates in general go down, then that 5% GE Coupon Rate starts looking attractive and investors will bid the price of the bond back above $1,000. When a bond trades above its face value it is said to be trading at a premium; when a bond trades below its face value it is said to be trading at a discount. Understanding the difference between your coupon payments and the true yield of a bond is critical if you ever trade bonds. Confused? Don't worry check out the video and head over to http://courses.wallstreetsurvivor.com/invest-smarter/
Views: 143043 Wall Street Survivor
Bonds: A more Concrete Definition and the Issuing Process
 
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In this video we provide an alternative (more 'formal') bond definition as well as an overview of the bond issuing process. For more content: http://www.ecognosi.org/
Views: 2135 EcoGnosi
Investment Banking Areas Explained: Capital Markets
 
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Capital markets are one of the most fascinating areas of investment banking. Companies need these services when they are about to go public or want to issue debt sold to the public. When a company wants to raise equity, we talk about ECM, standing for Equity Capital Markets, and when it wants to raise debt, we talk about DCM, standing for Debt Capital Markets. On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/365careers/ On the web: http://www.365careers.com/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/365careers Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/365careers
Views: 130221 365 Careers
What are Corporate Bonds? Episode 283
 
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http://meaningfulmoney.tv In this episode I explain how corporate bonds work. Though similar to their cousins, Gilts, which we covered in episode 282, there are important differences which you need to know about if you're going to build a meaningful portfolio.
Views: 2786 MeaningfulMoney
FRM Part I : Corporate Bonds Part I(of 3)
 
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FinTree website link: http://www.fintreeindia.com FB Page link :http://www.facebook.com/Fin... This series of video covers following key areas: • A bond indenture and explain the role of the corporate trustee in a bond indenture • A bond's maturity date and how it impacts bond retirements • The main types of interest payment classifications • Zero-Coupon bonds and the relationship between original issue discount and reinvestment risk • Among the following security types relevant for corporate bonds: mortgage bonds, collateral trust bonds, equipment trust certificates, subordinated and convertible debenture bonds, and guaranteed bonds • The mechanisms by which corporate bonds can be retired before maturity • Credit default risk and credit spread risk • Event risk and explain what may cause it in corporate bonds We love what we do, and we make awesome video lectures for CFA and FRM exams. Our Video Lectures are comprehensive, easy to understand and most importantly, fun to study with! This Video lecture was recorded by our popular trainer for CFA, Mr. Utkarsh Jain, during one of his live FRM Classes in Pune (India).
Original Issue Discount (OID) on Debt Issuances
 
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In this tutorial, you'll learn what "Original Issue Discount" or OID on Debt issuances means, and how it works on the financial statements. https://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" Table of Contents: 0:51 The Short, Simple Answer 4:04 The Longer Answer – OID on Debt with Principal Repayments 10:28 Recap and Summary Resources: https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/Original-Issue-Discount-Slides.pdf https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/Original-Issue-Discount.xlsx SHORT ANSWER: OID comes up when a company issues Debt at a discount to par value, e.g., a bond is worth $100, but the company issues it for $90. Usually, the company does this because the bond's coupon rate (interest rate) is below the rates of other, similar bonds, and the company needs to incentivize investors to buy it. It may also happen if there are doubts about the company's credit quality and ability to eventually repay the bond. The company amortizes this discount on the financial statements and keeps increasing the Book Value of Debt on the Balance Sheet. But the company still pays Interest based on the Face Value of that Debt – the $100! So, for Debt with a Face Value of $100 at a 10% Interest Rate, issued at $90, there will be $10 in Cash Interest and $2 of OID Amortization per year. On the Income Statement, there will be $12 in Total Interest Expense, which reduces Pre-Tax Income, Taxes, and Net Income. On the Cash Flow Statement, Net Income is lower, and we add back the $2 in OID Amortization each year since it's a non-cash expense. On the Balance Sheet, the Book Value of Debt increases from $90 to $100 over time, going up by $2 per year, but the Face Value is a constant $100 (the Face Value is not shown on the BS). THE LONGER ANSWER: When there are Mandatory or Optional Repayments on the Debt, you must amortize the OID more rapidly. Companies call this "Extra Amortization" something like "Loss on Unamortized OID on Repayment," and it's based on % Debt Principal repaid in the current year * OID balance after OID Amortization in the current year. So, if the Beginning OID Balance is $10, and there's $2 OID Amortization with $20 Repayment in Year 1, it's ($20 / $100) * $8, or $1.6. The Amortization of OID itself also changes in this scenario, and it's now based on -MIN(OID Beginning Balance, OID Beginning Balance / Years Remaining in OID Amortization Period). The net effect is that instead of straight-line amortizing $2 of OID per year, we amortize a total of $4, then $3, then $2, then $1, then less than $1. On the financial statements, the "Loss on Unamortized OID on Repayment" counts as another expense on the Income Statement. Cash Interest, OID Amortization, and Loss on Unamortized OID on Repayment all reduce the company's Pre-Tax Income, Taxes, and Net Income. On the CFS, Net Income is lower, and you add back the last two components since they're both non-cash expenses. These items boost the company's FCF because they're non-cash items that reduce the company's taxes, similar to Depreciation. Does OID Really Matter? In most cases, no, not really. Most Debt is not issued at a huge discount to par value; the 1-3% range is typical in normal markets. The company saves a tiny amount on taxes as a result, especially in countries with relatively low corporate tax rates… …and it takes a lot of extra work to set up these OID calculations, especially if there are many tranches of Debt. So, be familiar with OID, but don't obsess over it. You could easily simplify it or ignore it in case studies and modeling tests and be fine.
How to Play Defense with Corporate Bonds
 
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Risks are rising in the corporate bond market, and we think that it’s time to play defense with your corporate bond investments and consider moving up in credit quality. Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/charlesschwab Click here for more insights: http://www.schwab.com/insights/ (0219-9WXX)
Views: 4609 Charles Schwab
Why Do Corporate Bonds Yield More than Treasury Bonds?
 
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Professor Francis Longstaff and student Eric Neis say theres more to it than risk. Visit UCLA Anderson School of Management http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/ Click here for more faculty videos from UCLA Anderson School of Management http://www.anderson.ucla.edu/x17273.xml
Views: 4655 UCLA
Bonds explained - Buying bonds at issue and holding to maturity
 
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In this 9 minute video, Patrick Gordon, Senior Investment Strategist and Head of Fixed Income, will cover Corporate Bonds; Bond Features; Bond Prices; Bonds bought at issue and held to maturity and Bond Yields. If you would like to speak to someone about Bonds or any other investments, please call your Broker. For more information call 020 7337 0503 or visit http://www.killik.com. To find out how you can become a client visit http://www.killlik.com/getting-started.
Views: 3640 Killik & Co
Bonds & Debentures - Explained
 
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Bonds and Debentures are explained in hindi. Although a bond and a debenture work more or less the same way, there are few subtle differences. In this bonds vs debentures video, we will understand these differences on the basis of security, convertibility, risk etc. Bond market can give you fixed income which has much lesser risk as compared to share market. You can invest in corporate bonds & debentures, government bonds and Tax Saving Bonds. There are various types of bonds - convertible & non convertible debentures, zero coupon bonds, callable bonds, secured & unsecured debentures, redeemable a& irredeemable bonds etc. Related Videos: Shares vs Debentures (Bonds) - https://youtu.be/afSACc6c2c0 Types of Bonds & Debentures - https://youtu.be/5YN_Uo7stms How to Invest in Bonds & Debentures - https://youtu.be/hC9OsIzAoEk हिंदी में Bonds and Debentures के बीच तुलना। हालांकि एक bond और debenture एक ही तरह से कम या ज्यादा काम करते हैं, कुछ subtle differences हैं। इस bonds vs debentures वीडियो में, हम security, convertibility, risk etc के आधार पर इन differences को समझेंगे। Share this video: https://youtu.be/BdMg5RmMj_0 Subscribe To Our Channel and Get More Finance Tips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsNxHPbaCWL1tKw2hxGQD6g To access more learning resources on finance, check out www.assetyogi.com In this video, we have explained: What is equity financing? What is debt financing? What is an example of debt financing? What is the difference between a debenture and a bond? What are debentures in simple terms? What are bonds? What are the similarities between bonds and debentures? How do bonds work? What are debenture holders? How does a debenture work? If there is a requirement of funds in any company then there are two options. First one is equity financing and the other one is debt financing. Equity financing is a risk capital in which company dilute its shareholding. On the other hand, if the company doesn't want to dilute its shareholding then company raises debt financing. So in this video, we will understand the differences between bonds and debentures on the basis of security, convertibility, risk etc. A bond is a financial instrument which highlights the debt taken of the issuing body towards the holders. A debenture is an instrument used for raising long term finances. Make sure to like and share this video. Other Great Resources AssetYogi – http://assetyogi.com/ Follow Us: Instagram - http://instagram.com/assetyogi Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/assetyogi Linkedin - http://www.linkedin.com/company/asset-yogi Twitter - http://twitter.com/assetyogi Pinterest - http://pinterest.com/assetyogi/ Google Plus – https://plus.google.com/+assetyogi-ay Hope you liked this video in Hindi on “Bonds vs Debentures"
Views: 44768 Asset Yogi
Issuing bonds at par
 
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Views: 181 Rex Jacobsen
What are government bonds? - EduPop - Museo del Risparmio
 
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In order to get enough money to carry out its activities, a state must issue certificates also known as government bonds. Get to the core of the matter with this video of the EduPop series, the financial education project of Museo del Risparmio. http://www.museodelrisparmio.it
Views: 8122 Intesa Sanpaolo
18. Who issues Bonds?
 
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Equity - or public equity in the form of stocks is issued by companies. Not only companies can borrow - and not only companies can borrow through securitised debt.
Views: 7243 savingandinvesting
Convertible Bonds
 
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Convertible bonds are corporate bonds that investors are able to ‘convert’ to a set number of shares of the issuer’s common stock. So why not just buy the company’s stock in the first place? Watch to learn more. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 49654 Zions TV
What are Bonds ? Types of bonds | Hindi
 
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In this video, I have explained What are Bonds Difference Between Bonds and Debentures Types of Bonds ---------------------------------------------- Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/BasicGyaan.F Twitter: https://twitter.com/BasicGyaan Instagram Myself: https://www.instagram.com/Basic.Gyaan/... Microphone i use : http://amzn.to/2xBYjBO About : BASIC GYAAN is a YouTube Channel, where you will find Videos on curious interesting topics related to Finance, Economics and Trending topics in Hindi, New Video is Posted Every week :)
Views: 162011 Basic Gyaan
What are bonds and Debentures || Bond क्या होता है
 
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Bonds and Debentures ? Both are long term debt instruments. Issued by Government of India or by public listed company ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Subscribe: https://goo.gl/yNw13g Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/c/Finbaba Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/finbabaIndia Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/finbabaIndia Instagram: http://instagram.com/finbabaIndia ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe Our Channel click Here for Latest Video https://goo.gl/yNw13g ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Related Videos : Save Tax under section 80C : https://youtu.be/y5Sat6TcJHs Mutual funds : https://youtu.be/-gP4HfMCeBQ Gold ETFS :https://youtu.be/EPjiho6m1XI Arbitrage fund : https://youtu.be/3oyryG22H4I How to find stop loss : https://youtu.be/jZugeeEVSP0 FCNR account : https://youtu.be/G4GFoQFy_RI Stock Market Tax : https://youtu.be/hcYDeXEW6eY Stock Split : https://youtu.be/NQpW2oBemyk How to Buy Share Onlie https://youtu.be/g8Eb1LVNXM0 What is Cnadle stick https://youtu.be/-Sjhv7h3IT8 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Open Demat account :https://zerodha.com/open-account?c=ZMPASV ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- About: FinBaba is a you-tube channel, where you can get Information about Banking, finance, Stock market basic and Advance, Forex, Mutual funds and many more. Thanks For Watching this Video. !
Views: 119666 Fin Baba
Shares vs Debentures (Bonds) - Explained
 
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Shares vs Debentures or Bonds, where should you invest? A detailed comparison in hindi will help you understand the difference between investing in share market vs bond market or debenture market. Related Videos: Bonds vs Debentures - https://youtu.be/BdMg5RmMj_0 Shares vs Debentures (Bonds) - https://youtu.be/afSACc6c2c0 Types of Bonds & Debentures - https://youtu.be/5YN_Uo7stms How to Invest in Bonds & Debentures - https://youtu.be/hC9OsIzAoEk Shares vs Bonds or Debentures, आपको कहाँ निवेश करना चाहिए? हिंदी में एक detailed comparison आपको share market vs bond market or debenture market में निवेश के बीच के अंतर को समझने में मदद करेगा। Share this video: https://youtu.be/afSACc6c2c0 Subscribe To Our Channel and Get More Finance Tips: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCsNxHPbaCWL1tKw2hxGQD6g To access more learning resources on finance, check out www.assetyogi.com In this video, we have explained: What is a share in the stock market? What are the risks in shares investing? What are the risks and returns of a bond or debenture? What does it mean to have shares in a company? What is a bond or debenture? Is there a higher risk in share market? What is a good investment return? Do shareholders have voting rights? Do bondholders have voting rights? Can debentures be converted into shares? Once you understand the difference between Shares, Bonds an Debentures, you can decide to invest in low risk fixed income securities or high risk equity markets. Make sure to like and share this video. Other Great Resources AssetYogi – http://assetyogi.com/ Follow Us: Facebook – https://www.facebook.com/assetyogi Instagram - http://instagram.com/assetyogi Google Plus – https://plus.google.com/+assetyogi-ay Pinterest - http://pinterest.com/assetyogi/ Twitter - http://twitter.com/assetyogi Linkedin - http://www.linkedin.com/company/asset-yogi Hope you liked this video in Hindi on “Shares vs Bonds / Debentures"
Views: 15523 Asset Yogi
Raising capital by issuing bonds
 
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How many bonds to issue to raise enough capital?
Views: 285 MyFinanceTeacher
Bonds - Issue Bonds at Premium
 
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Journal Entries
Views: 85 Tracy L. Morgan
Accounting for Bonds Issued at Par
 
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This video explains how to account for bonds issued at par in the context of financial accounting. An example is provided to illustrate the necessary journal entries. Edspira is your source for business and financial education. To view the entire video library for free, visit http://www.Edspira.com To like us on Facebook, visit https://www.facebook.com/Edspira Edspira is the creation of Michael McLaughlin, who went from teenage homelessness to a PhD. The goal of Michael's life is to increase access to education so all people can achieve their dreams. To learn more about Michael's story, visit http://www.MichaelMcLaughlin.com To follow Michael on Facebook, visit https://facebook.com/Prof.Michael.McLaughlin To follow Michael on Twitter, visit https://twitter.com/Prof_McLaughlin
Views: 26952 Edspira
What it means to buy a company's stock | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a company's stock. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/stocks-intro-tutorial/v/bonds-vs-stocks?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Many people own stocks, but, unfortunately, most of them don't really understand what they own. This tutorial will keep you from being one of those people (not keep you from owning stock, but keep you from being ignorant about your investments). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 565307 Khan Academy
Equity vs. debt | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Debt vs. Equity. Market Capitalization, Asset Value, and Enterprise Value. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/chapter-7-bankruptcy-liquidation?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/more-on-ipos?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: This is an old set of videos, but if you put up with Sal's messy handwriting (it has since improved) and spotty sound, there is a lot to be learned here. In particular, this tutorial walks through starting, financing and taking public a company (and even talks about what happens if it has trouble paying its debts). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 379767 Khan Academy
CONVERTIBLE BONDS EXPLAINED - TESLA CONVERTIBLE BOND EXAMPLE
 
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What is a convertible bond! A convertible bond is a debt instrument issued by a company in order to get financing. The company will pay a periodic interest rate on the borrowed amount and, like any other bond, the bond has a maturity date. But, unlike other bonds, the holder of the bond can choose between getting his money back or, converting his bonds for a pre-set number of shares in the company or common stocks. The decision depends on the value of the shares in that moment. If the market value of the shares is higher than the bond principal, it is better to convert. If the market value of the shares is lower, it is better to require the debt to be repaid. This video will discuss: What is a convertible bond - definition Why do companies issue convertible bonds - convertible bond advantages Why do investors buy convertible bonds Convertible bonds accounting What do you need to know as an investor in stocks that issue convertible bonds 3 convertible bond examples (Tesla convertible bond, Ctrip, 51Jobs) How do convertible bonds affect earnings (a bit of accounting) Convertible bonds conclusion What do I do? Full-time independent stock market analyst and researcher! STOCK MARKET RESEARCH PLATFORM (analysis, stocks to buy, model portfolio): https://sven-carlin-research-platform.teachable.com/p/stock-market-research-platform Check the comparative table on my Stock market research platform under curriculum preview! I am also a book author: Modern Value Investing book: https://amzn.to/2lvfH3t More at the Sven Carlin blog: https://svencarlin.com Stock market for modern value investors Facebook Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/modernvalueinvesting/
Raising money for a startup | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Raising money from an angel investor. Pre-money and post-money valuation. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/venture-capital-and-capital-markets/v/getting-a-seed-round-from-a-vc?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/valuation-and-investing/v/ebitda?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: This is an old set of videos, but if you put up with Sal's messy handwriting (it has since improved) and spotty sound, there is a lot to be learned here. In particular, this tutorial walks through starting, financing and taking public a company (and even talks about what happens if it has trouble paying its debts). About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 558687 Khan Academy
Types of Debt Securities
 
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Discover different types of debt instruments, including Government securities, Government agencies, municipal bonds, and corporate bonds. This educational video is part of Zions Direct University's Beginner series. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 50774 Zions TV
Types of Shares - Equity and Preference
 
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In this video I have explained about terms : Types of share Equity Share Preference Share Difference between Equity and preference shares ---------------------------------------------- Open an online trading and Demat account with Zerodha - https://zerodha.com/open-account?c=ZMPNYN ---------------------------------------------- Here are some recommended books for Share market education with corresponding links: Hindi books: Kaise market Mein Nivaise Kare - http://amzn.to/2fgFEkf Intraday Trading Ki Pehchan - http://amzn.to/2fGJmUO English Books: The Intelligent Investor - http://amzn.to/2xZ8cdw How to Make Money Trading with Candlestick Charts - http://amzn.to/2y0vBLi ---------------------------------------------- Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Facebook:https://www.facebook.com/BasicGyaan.F Twitter: https://twitter.com/BasicGyaan Instagram Myself :https://www.instagram.com/Basic.Gyaan/... Microphone i use : http://amzn.to/2xBYjBO About : BASIC GYAAN is a YouTube Channel, where you will find Videos on curious interesting topics related to Finance, Economics and Trending topics in Hindi, New Video is Posted Every week :)
Views: 466698 Basic Gyaan
Introduction to Debt and Equity Financing
 
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Help us learn more about your experience by completing this short survey: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/RRKS8LZ Subscribe to Alanis Business Academy on YouTube for updates on the latest videos: https://www.youtube.com/alanisbusinessacademy?sub_confirmation=1 Finance is the function responsible for identifying the firm's best sources of funding as well as how best to use those funds. These funds allow firms to meet payroll obligations, repay long-term loans, pay taxes, and purchase equipment among other things. Although many different methods of financing exist, we classify them under two categories: debt financing and equity financing. To address why firms have two main sources of funding we have take a look at the accounting equation. The basic accounting equation states that assets equal liabilities plus owners' equity. This equation remains constant because firms look to debt, also known as liabilities, or investor money, also known as owners' equity, to run operations. Debt financing is long-term borrowing provided by non-owners, meaning individuals or other firms that do not have an ownership stake in the company. Debt financing commonly takes the form of taking out loans and selling corporate bonds. Using debt financing provides several benefits to firms. First, interest payments are tax deductible. Just like the interest on a mortgage loan is tax deductible for homeowners, firms can reduce their taxable income if they pay interest on loans. Although deduction does not entirely offset the interest payments it at least lessens the financial impact of raising money through debt financing. Another benefit to debt financing is that firm's utilizing this form of financing are not required to publicly disclose of their plans as a condition of funding. The allows firms to maintain some degree of secrecy so that competitors are not made away of their future plans. The last benefit of debt financing that we'll discuss is that it avoids what is referred to as the dilution of ownership. We'll talk more about the dilution of ownership when we discuss equity financing. Although debt financing certainly has its advantages, like all things, there are some negative sides to raising money through debt financing. The first disadvantage is that a firm that uses debt financing is committing to making fixed payments, which include interest. This decreases a firm's cash flow. Firms that rely heavily in debt financing can run into cash flow problems that can jeopardize their financial stability. The next disadvantage to debt financing is that loans may come with certain restrictions. These restrictions can include things like collateral, which require the firm to pledge an asset against the loan. If the firm defaults on payments then the issuer can seize the asset and sell it to recover their investment. Another restriction is a covenant. Covenants are stipulations or terms placed on the loan that the firm must adhere to as a condition of the loan. Covenants can include restrictions on additional funding as well as restrictions on paying dividends. Equity financing involves acquiring funds from owners, who are also known as shareholders. Equity financing commonly involves the issuance of common stock in public and secondary offerings or the use of retained earnings. A benefit of using equity financing is the flexibility that it provides over debt financing. Equity financing does not come with the same collateral and covenants that can be imposed with debt financing. Another benefit to equity financing also does not increase a firms risk of default like debt financing does. A firm that utilizes equity financing does not pay interest, and although many firm's pay dividends to their investors they are under no obligation to do so. The downside to equity financing is that it produces no tax benefits and dilutes the ownership of existing shareholders. Dilution of ownership means that existing shareholders percentage of ownership decreases as the firm decides to issue additional shares. For example, lets say that you own 50 shares in ABC Company and there are 200 shares outstanding. This means that you hold a 25 percent stake in ABC Company. With such a large percentage of ownership you certainly have the power to affect decision-making. In order to raise additional funding ABC Company decides to issue 200 additional shares. You still hold 50 shares in the company, but now there are 400 shares outstanding. Which means you now hold a 12.5 percent stake in the company. Thus your ownership has been diluted due to the issuance of additional shares. A prime example of the dilution of ownership occurred in in the mid-2000's when Facebook co-founder Eduardo Saverin had his ownership stake reduced by the issuance of additional shares.
Bonds Explained for Beginners | Bond Trading 101
 
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Earn up to 1 Year Free: https://bit.ly/2oul70h Free Resources: https://bit.ly/2wymZbJ A bond is a type of loan issued to some type of entity such as a business or government by an investor. It’s similar to borrowing money from a lender if you’ve ever purchased a home or car before. Sometimes businesses need more money than the banks will offer them, so they issue bonds as a way to raise more capital. Governments can also issue bonds when they need more money for things like roads or parks. Bonds are considered safer on the risk spectrum for investments, but they also typically carry a lower return. Benjamin Graham, author of the intelligent investor and Warren Buffets mentor, recommends holding a portfolio of 75% stocks and 25% bonds during a bull market and 75% bonds and 25% stocks during a bear market. As opposed to other investments which are considered equity, bonds are considered debt which means that if a company goes under, it must repay all bondholders before stockholders. This is due to the fixed interest nature of the bond. When the investor purchases a bond at what’s called the face value, they are paid interest, known as the coupon or yield. The reason it’s referred to as coupon is because back when bonds were actually paper, investors would physically have to clip coupons to redeem their interest. Anyway, the investor is paid a coupon on the bond until the loan is fully paid back by the issuer. This is known as the maturity date. Interest payment frequency and the maturity date is determined prior to the purchase of the bond. For example, if I purchase a $1,000, 3-year bond with a 5% coupon, I know I’ll receive $50 in interest each year for 3 years. Now it’s important to note that Bonds can vary in risk and return A AAA bond is the best bond you can buy while a Ba bond and lower are more speculative and are known as Junk bonds When it comes to bonds, the higher the return, the higher the risk. The lower the return, the lower the risk. Bonds with a longer maturity date are also riskier and carry a higher return. Typically government bonds will be safer than corporate bonds. When it comes to taxation, corporate bonds are taxed regularly while some bonds like municipal and other government bonds are tax-exempt. A bond can also be secured or unsecured With an unsecured bond, you may lose all of your investment if the company fails while with a secured bond, the company pledges specific assets to give shareholders if they fail to repay their bonds. Although bonds are considered a “safer” investment, they still do come with risks. When you purchase a bond, interest rates are out of your control and may fluctuate. Interest rates are controlled by the U.S. treasury, the federal reserve, and the banking industry. This means that if specified in your agreement, the company may be able to issue a call provision which is an early redemption of the bond. While not always the case, companies will take advantage of lower interest rates to pay back loans early. This leaves you with a lower return than what you expected. Bonds are also inversely proportional to interest rates so when interest rates go up, bonds go down and vice versa. Bonds can also be traded between investors prior to its maturity date. A bond that’s traded below the market value is said to be trading at a discount while a bond trading for more than it’s face value is trading at a premium. Bonds can be a great way to diversify your investment portfolio, however, they can also be quite complex. You can use investment platforms like Fidelity, E-Tade, or Charles Shwabb to learn more about specific types of bonds. For today’s video, we will be using Fidelity. Social Links: Website: http://www.wharmstrong.com Twitter: http://bit.ly/2DBEhdz Facebook: http://bit.ly/2F5uB8a Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/wharmstrong1/ Disclaimer: Nothing published on my channel should be considered personal investment advice. Although I do discuss various types of investments and strategies, I am not a licensed professional. Please invest responsibly. This post contains affiliate links
Views: 9039 Will Armstrong
Startup Funding Explained: Everything You Need to Know
 
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The Rest Of Us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/TheRestOfUs The Rest Of Us on Twitter: http://twitter.com/TROUchannel The Rest Of Us T-Shirts and More: http://teespring.com/TheRestOfUsClothing Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fcjmVj5fM5k Credits: Music by The FatRat. https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCa_UMppcMsHIzb5LDx1u9zQ If you're a YouTuber, definitely check The FatRat. The channel offers a wide variety of free-to-use music for your videos.
Views: 1528273 The Rest Of Us
Investing Basics: Bonds
 
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Bonds are one of the most common investments, but to many investors they’re still a mystery. In this video you’ll learn the basics of bonds and how they might be used by traders looking to preserve capital and pursue extra income.
Views: 218309 TD Ameritrade
Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 583924 Khan Academy
Book Value vs Market Value vs Face Value of Bonds: How to Keep Them Straight
 
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You’ll learn about the book value vs market value vs face value of bonds in this tutorial, and you’ll understand how to calculate and project them in financial models. https://breakingintowallstreet.com/ "Financial Modeling Training And Career Resources For Aspiring Investment Bankers" Resources: https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/Book-Value-vs-Face-Value-Slides.pdf https://youtube-breakingintowallstreet-com.s3.amazonaws.com/Book-Value-vs-Face-Value.xlsx Table of Contents: 3:06 Excel Examples 11:04 Combined Example 14:46 Recap and Summary SHORT ANSWER: Face Value is the amount of Debt that a company issues, pays interest on, and must repay upon maturity. It is affected ONLY by Debt issuances, principal repayments, and Accrued or “Paid-in-Kind” (PIK) Interest. Book Value is the Debt that shows up on a company’s Balance Sheet under Liabilities & Equity, but it is NOT necessarily the amount it pays Interest on or what it must eventually repay. It’s affected by everything above (issuances, repayments, and accrued interest), plus Issuance Fees, any Discount or Premium when the bond is first issued, and the amortization of both those items. Market Value is what someone else would pay to buy the company’s Debt on the secondary market if it trades like that. It’s affected by interest payments, market interest rates on similar Debt, and future repayment upon maturity. In practice, the bond’s coupon rate vs market rates, as well as the credit default risk of the issuer, make the biggest impact. EXCEL EXAMPLES: Toro is spending a lot and must issue additional Debt to fund operations in several years. The Face Value of Debt goes up when new Debt is issued and down when there’s a repayment or maturity. The Book Value of Debt also changes based on these, but we also must deduct the 2% financing fee on new issuances and add the amortization of these financing fees over 10 years. We don’t know enough to determine the Market Value since it depends on current market rates vs the 6.1% coupon rate the company is currently paying. In another example, Atlassian has issued a Convertible Bond that matures in 5 years, if it’s not converted into Equity before then. Convertible Bonds are often separated into Equity and Debt components to reflect their dual nature, and the Book Value here equals the Face Value minus the Unamortized Issuance Fees minus the Debt Discount, which represents the difference in value between a traditional, non-convertible bond with a higher interest rate and the much-lower-rate convertible bond. The Face Value here never changes until the end because there are no additional issuances, there’s no accrued interest, and there’s only the single maturity at the very end. Cash Interest never changes since it’s always based on this constant Face Value and a constant interest rate. The Book Value keeps increasing as the Debt Discount is amortized over time and as the Issuance Fees are also amortized, but it finally reaches $0 at the same time as the Face Value. We don’t know enough to determine the Market Value, as we’d need to know the prevailing market interest rates on similar bonds and Atlassian’s default risk. ONE EXAMPLE TO RULE THEM ALL: Assume that a company issues a $1,000 10-year bond at a 5.00% coupon rate vs prevailing market rates of 6.35% on similar bonds. There are no principal repayments, and the interest is 100% Cash. There is a 2% issuance fee. Due to the below-market rate, the bond is issued at a $100 Discount. The Face Value is $1,000 initially, and it never changes until maturity. The Cash Interest is 5% * $1,000 = $50 per year until maturity. The initial Book Value is the $1,000 Face Value – $100 Discount – $20 Issuance Fee = $880. The Book Value will change according to the amortization of the Discount and the amortization of the Issuance Fees each year. Book Value, Year 1: $880 + $100 / 10 + $20 / 10 = $892 Book Value, Year 2: $892 + $100 / 10 + $20 / 10 = $904 The Market Value is initially the $1,000 Face Value minus the $100 Discount (verify with the PRICE function in Excel), so $900. We don’t know exactly how it will change over time because we don’t know future interest rates, but if rates go up, the Market Value will go down, and if credit default risk goes up, the Market Value will also go down (and vice versa for both of these). Does Book Value vs Market Value vs Face Value for Bonds Matter? In most cases, these distinctions don’t make a huge difference. If you’re under time pressure, you can simplify all this and include only Issuances and Repayments to project Debt. But interview questions on these topics could still come up, and if a company has a Convertible Bond or a normal bond issued at a big discount or premium, the Book Value vs Face Value distinction matters since interest is based on Face Value.
Bond Investing : How Do Corporate Bonds Work?
 
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With corporate bonds, a corporation is the one that is borrowing money, and under most cases, a corporate bond is issued directly by the corporation when it first comes out. Find out how corporate bonds often have their debts paid off early with help from a licensed financial planner in this free video on bonds and investing. Expert: William Rae Contact: www.hbwfl.com Bio: William Rae has been licensed in the insurance and financial fields for more than 30 years. Filmmaker: Christopher Rokosz
Views: 6554 ehowfinance
What are Municipal Bonds? | Fidelity
 
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Learn the details behind general obligation municipal bonds – what they are, why they are created, and how they work – with this illustrated video by Fidelity. To learn more about municipal bonds, please visit https://www.fidelity.com/fixedincome-bonds/individual-bonds/municipal-bonds. To see more videos from Fidelity Investments, subscribe to: https://www.youtube.com/fidelityinvestments Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fidelityinvestments Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/fidelity Google+: https://plus.google.com/+fidelity LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fidelity-investments ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Many people purchase municipal bonds as part of their overall investing strategy, but there’s quite a story behind how they are created, how they work, who’s involved. The municipal bond process can be a complicated one, so we’ll try to simplify it for you. Our story begins by paying a visit to Anytown, USA. Anytown is a great place to live. There’s a thriving cultural scene, good schools, and a strong business environment. It’s no wonder that many families have moved here. But, with lots of families now living in Anytown, the schools are bursting at the seams. The mayor, town council, and school district leaders all agree that a brand new school is needed, in addition to expansions to some of the existing school buildings. But, at an estimated cost of $30,000,000, how will the town pay for it? The town leaders come up with a plan to raise these funds by issuing bonds. This means that Anytown will borrow money from investors with the expectation of paying them back, with interest, over time. The people who will actually use the school building in the future will also be the folks paying for it. Anytown will use property tax revenues to repay the investors, backed by the full faith and taxing authority of the town. This is called a “general obligation municipal bond.” But, things can’t move forward just yet. Voter approval of the proposal is required. So, a bond proposal is developed and put on the ballot, as part of an election. The votes are tallied and the proposal is passed. At this point in our story, some new characters enter the scene: the underwriter, the bond counsel, and in most cases, the financial advisor. The financial advisor helps Anytown make decisions regarding the bond issue and works with the underwriter to determine pricing and distribution to investors. The underwriter acts as a liaison between the town and potential investors when bringing the bond issue to market. An underwriter can be chosen in two ways: via competitive sale or negotiated sale. The leaders of Anytown decide to go the competitive route, and put the bond issue out to bid. This is where the bond counsel, Smith & Jones Law Firm, enters the picture. Smith & Jones prepares the bond documents, including the Official Statement, and since Anytown has chosen the competitive route, a Notice of Sale. The Official Statement contains all the information a prospective investor needs in order to invest in Anytown’s bond issue. The underwriter will review the Official Statement and decide whether to bid on the bond. The bond counsel also writes the legal opinion, which provides justification and law for the tax exempt status of the issue and ensures that the bonds are valid and binding obligations for Anytown. The firm does not comment on the investment merit of the bond issue. Now that the legal opinion is in place, the Notice of Sale can be completed and posted. ABC Investment Bank sees the ad and is interested in underwriting it, with the ultimate goal of buying the muni bond issue from Anytown, and reselling it to investors. Before submitting a bid, however, they would like to invite other investment banks to participate with them, so they decide to form a syndicate and act as the syndicate manager. Forming a syndicate will allow the bank to share the marketing and distribution duties, as well as some of the financial risk of underwriting the bond issue. Two banks, JKL and XYZ, agree to join ABC Syndicate and they submit a bid. Back at Anytown town hall, the bid is reviewed, along with several others up for consideration. After much deliberation, the bond issue is awarded to the syndicate formed by ABC Investment Bank because they turned in the lowest borrowing cost. The syndicate goes to work as the underwriter, reaching out to individual and institutional investors to determine their interest in purchasing the bonds [...] Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC, Member NYSE, SIPC, 900 Salem Street, Smithfield, RI 02917 608004.3.0
Views: 75637 Fidelity Investments
SOVEREIGN OVERSEAS BONDS - Three Minutes - 11 July
 
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SOVEREIGN OVERSEAS BONDS - Three Minutes - 11 July Gist of an important topic in 3 minutes - learn and enjoy :)
Stocks and Bonds – Listing on the Vienna Stock Exchange
 
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Corporate Financing through the Vienna Stock Exchange – Stocks and Bonds. In this video, Dominik Gansloser of the Berenberg investment bank confirms that currently the market window for IPOs and capital market transactions in general is wide open. Jürgen Höblinger of Erste Group Bank AG speaks about bonds as a source of financing and the CEO of Best in Parking - Holding AG, Johann Breiteneder, talks about the change process at his company after the first bond issue. Henriette Lininger, Head of Issuers at the Vienna Stock Exchange and contact for companies interested in going public, will guide you through the video.
Views: 479 Wiener Börse
Bonds & Bond Valuation | Introduction to Corporate Finance | CPA Exam BEC | CMA Exam | Chp 7 p 1
 
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When a corporation or government wishes to borrow money from the public on a long-term basis, it usually does so by issuing or selling debt securities that are generically called bonds. In this section, we describe the various features of corporate bonds and some of the terminology associated with bonds. We then discuss the cash flows associated with a bond and how bonds can be valued using our discounted cash flow procedure. BOND FEATURES AND PRICES As we mentioned in our previous chapter, a bond is normally an interest-only loan, meaning that the borrower will pay the interest every period, but none of the principal will be repaid until the end of the loan. For example, suppose the Beck Corporation wants to borrow $1,000 for 30 years. The interest rate on similar debt issued by similar corporations is 12 percent. Beck will thus pay .12 × $1,000 = $120 in interest every year for 30 years. At the end of 30 years, Beck will repay the $1,000. As this example suggests, a bond is a fairly simple financing arrangement. There is, however, a rich jargon associated with bonds, so we will use this example to define some of the more important terms. In our example, the $120 regular interest payments that Beck promises to make are called the bond’s coupons. Because the coupon is constant and paid every year, the type of bond we are describing is sometimes called a level coupon bond. The amount that will be repaid at the end of the loan is called the bond’s face value, or par value. As in our example, this par value is usually $1,000 for corporate bonds, and a bond that sells for its par value is called a par value bond. Government bonds frequently have much larger face, or par, values. Finally, the annual coupon divided by the face value is called the coupon rate on the bond; in this case, because $120/1,000 = 12%, the bond has a 12 percent coupon rate. The number of years until the face value is paid is called the bond’s time to maturity. A corporate bond will frequently have a maturity of 30 years when it is originally issued, but this varies. Once the bond has been issued, the number of years to maturity declines as time goes by. BOND VALUES AND YIELDS As time passes, interest rates change in the marketplace. The cash flows from a bond, however, stay the same. As a result, the value of the bond will fluctuate. When interest rates rise, the present value of the bond’s remaining cash flows declines, and the bond is worth less. When interest rates fall, the bond is worth more. To determine the value of a bond at a particular point in time, we need to know the number of periods remaining until maturity, the face value, the coupon, and the market interest rate for bonds with similar features. This interest rate required in the market on a bond is called the bond’s yield to maturity (YTM). This rate is sometimes called the bond’s yield for short. Given all this information, we can calculate the present value of the cash flows as an estimate of the bond’s current market value.
Convertible Notes, Equity and Startup Funding Explained
 
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If you're starting your first company, understanding stock, preferred stock, options, convertible notes and other fundraising instruments can be truly overwhelming. We didn't find a single video that covered this, so here we go. If you are an early-stage startup company in the tech space, the best way to raise capital is with a convertible note or a similar instrument. However, to understand how those work, we first need to understand how stock works. STOCK You are probably familiar with the term 'stock.' A company is divided into chunks, and each shareholder owns a certain percentage of the company, which gives control of company decisions, and a share of the profits. A PRICED ROUND: RAISING MONEY FOR STOCK The 'traditional' approach towards raising capital is with a priced round. Tech companies are different. Tech companies have tremendous scale potential and often fantastic margins. A software product or an app, for example, can realistically operate with 80%+ margins, and serve millions of customers around the world, with a minimal staff. Think of Uber, who raised $500,000 on their first round, and are now worth, well, billions of dollars. So the value of a startup is not related directly to their revenue, but to their potential. Some variables to take into account here are: - The market size, how many customers are there in the world. - The technology variable, is there a unique piece of tech that nobody else has, or that optimizes a process drastically? - Potential margins, how many employees are needed to serve 100,000 customers or 1,000,000 customers? When Instagram had 300 million users, their staff was 13 people. However, all these numbers are variables and theories, and nobody knows for sure. The valuation of a startup is defined by how much potential an investor sees in the business, how risky it is, and how much upside do they want in exchange for risking their money, just like a bet. These days, a reasonable number for a tech company like our theoretical FounderHub would be a $4,000,000 (pre-money) valuation. Again, assuming this is a high scale, high margin business. All of these decisions require negotiations, and lawyers, and signatures to be put in writing, and they can make the process take six months or more from 'agreeing to invest.' Since most early companies don't have six months, they often choose to go with a Convertible Note. If you want to run your own calculations, you can download the free template we have at FounderHub.io?utm_source=youtube.com&utm_medium=video&utm_campaign=video-content&utm_term=fundraising CONVERTIBLE NOTES A convertible note is an instrument that delays the valuation conversation, and it allows the company to access the capital sooner, with less negotiation and much smaller legal fees. A convertible note is like a loan, but instead of using an asset like a house for collateral, the company stock is the collateral. This means, obviously, that the investor also needs to believe in the business to invest, because the note intends to convert into stock. Like I said before, defining a company valuation is tough. Too many variables, too little data... so with a convertible note, the investor is saying: I'll give you the money for you to grow now. In a year or so we should have the data to support a priced, traditional round, so my investment will convert then, with the valuation and terms that the new investors define. So a convertible note is an investment that triggers, - Ideally, on a new round of funding. - Also ideally, if the company is acquired. - At a predefined deadline, often 18 or 24 months after the original investment. At this point, investors can negotiate a note extension, they can convert it at the Cap, or they can request a payback, again, if the company can afford it. Now, YCombinator and 500 Startups have both designed documents inspired by convertible notes, but simpler. And free. The KISS-A (Keep it simple security) and the SAFE (simple agreement for future equity) are simplified convertible note templates that you can use to raise money and skip lawyer fees. You can download it on our FounderHub site, and refer to our knowledge base for more details on completing it. They both work as a convertible note but reducing a lot of the paperwork requirements. Alright. We have videos coming on the process of incorporating a business, distributing founder stock and vesting. Let us know which of those topics you would like us to prioritize. If you found this useful, help us out by subscribing and sharing. ► Subscribe to our Channel Here http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=slidebean -- About Us: Slidebean is a pitch deck creation tool with hundreds of templates available to use as a starting point. Thousands of companies have used our platform to pitch investors and raise capital. ---- Follow Us: Twitter: https://twitter.com/slidebean Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/company/slidebean
Bonds & Notes Payable Introduction
 
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Bonds and notes payable will be forms of raising capital for a company. In other words a company that needs cash for operations can raise capital using different options. They may take a loan form the bank, issue stock, or issue bonds. each option has pros and cons. Issuing stock results in selling equity interest in the company but does not result in interest payments. Issuing bonds and notes result in interest expense. The interest expense is deductible. Loans or notes payable are often taken from a bank. Bonds could be used to issue to the public. For more accounting Information see website. http://accountinginstruction.info/courses/
What are government bonds? | IG Explainers
 
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Learn all about government bonds: including what they are, how they work, and why they move in price. ► Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/IGUnitedKingdom?sub_confirmation=1 ► Learn more: https://www.ig.com/uk/bonds/what-are-government-bonds Twitter: https://twitter.com/IGcom Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/IGcom LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/igcom Google Play: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.iggroup.android.cfd&hl=en_GB We provide fast and flexible access to over 10,000 financial markets – including indices, shares, forex, commodities – through our award-winning range of platforms and apps. Established in 1974 as the world’s first financial spread betting firm, we’re now the world’s No.1 provider of CFDs and spread betting* and a global leader in forex. We also offer an execution-only share dealing service in the UK, Ireland, Germany, Austria and the Netherlands. Through our low fees and smart price-sourcing technology, we help traders keep their costs down. All trading involves risk. Spread bets and CFDs are leveraged products and can result in losses that exceed deposits. The value of shares, ETFs and ETCs bought through a share dealing account can fall as well as rise. Please take care to manage your exposure. * For CFDs, based on revenue excluding FX, published financial statements, October 2016; number of active UK financial spread betting accounts (Investment Trends UK Leveraged Trading Report released June 2017); for forex based on number of primary relationships with FX traders (Investment Trends UK Leveraged Trading Report released June 2017)
Views: 12992 IG UK
Investing in Corporate Bonds
 
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Morgans Director Steven Wright speaks with Australian Corporate Bond Company CEO, Richard Murphy. ACBC: http://www.xtbs.com.au/ Morgans Financial Limited: http://www.morgans.com.au/ Phone: 1800 777 946 Follow us on… LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/company/morgans-financial-limited Twitter: http://twitter.com/morgansAU Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/MorgansAU
Views: 911 Morgans
WHAT IS THE PROCEDURE TO ISSUE THE BONDS
 
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Mr. Jyoti Prakash Gadia (Managing Director Resurgent India Limited) sharing his views on "WHAT IS THE PROCEDURE TO ISSUE THE BONDS" at Zee Business.
Bonds Vs Preferred Stock Vs Common Stock / How to Invest in Stock Market in Urdu / Hindi
 
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I hope you will have understanding in this video about what is bonds, what is preferred stock and what is common stock. For more videos you can check below links on how to invest in stock market and making money from stock market tips and secrets of stocks. What is Right Issue of Shares / Why Company Issue Right Shares https://youtu.be/hBiiIHBMwtI What is Mutual Funds? How to Invest in Mutual Funds in Pakistan https://youtu.be/FL4-8sUCwkI What is Bonus Shares in Urdu / Hindi l Bonus Issue l Advantages & Disadvantages https://youtu.be/3xLfBNTlN2s List Of Registered Stock Brokers in Pakistan Stock Exchange https://youtu.be/9w78GZ9s9ts How To Choose Best Stock Broker https://youtu.be/rsYj-s0dkT8 Why 95% Of Traders Fail To Make Money In Stock Market https://youtu.be/SEivcCOvSQw How he made Billions from Stock market https://youtu.be/1U1GbG6ykFM Are You An Investor Or A Speculator https://youtu.be/8mzj50E9Zp0 How to Buy Low Sell High in Urdu https://youtu.be/knASIE50qC0 How to Start Investing in Stock Market https://youtu.be/jXqeekpgdX8 How I lose my money in stock market https://youtu.be/z_4deZIoaj4 How to invest in stock market in Urdu, Investment VS Speculation https://youtu.be/xDDM5RspAFw Top 3 Mistakes beginners in the Stock Market make! https://youtu.be/7c9ZzUvXv3A How to buy shares in Karachi stock exchange https://youtu.be/G5DTrkhUuj4 How Stock Market Prices Move Up and Down in Urdu https://youtu.be/dnHKIRffrQw Four Reasons Why / When Investor Sell Shares in Karachi Stock Exchange https://youtu.be/yQ7LBER482Q SECRET: How to Make Money in Stock Market in Urdu https://youtu.be/TavW8QfLfgU Warren Buffet Invest Like a Girl in Urdu https://youtu.be/QgOgLrABPM4
Views: 4408 Ali Iqbal