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Health Economics
 
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Hi, my name is Dr. Sanjay Sharma. I am a Professor of Ophthalmology and Epidemiology at Queen's University. As a researcher, I am very interested in a particular area of epidemiology called health economics. Part of the goal of health economics is to work out the cost-benefit numbers for new interventions in a way that can help doctors and policy makers make the often difficult decisions on which interventions to pay for and which may be too expensive for public healthcare to fund. I want to give you a high level overview of how we do this... The key thing is being able to put a value on a new drug or procedure.  In healthcare we measure value in a unit called the QALYs or quality adjusted life years. One QALY is equal to living for one year in perfect health. So how do we work this out? Well, what we do is we look at the average person with a specific disease and then we look at all the outcomes of that disease both with and without the intervention that we are evaluating. For each possible outcome, we assign a probability and a utility score. The utility score is a measure of how much your quality of life would decrease with a certain outcome. For example, someone with wet macular degeneration might say that if they went blind, their quality of life would decreases by 55% - this would mean a utility score of 0.45. Using a mathematical model called a Markov model, we combine the utility scores and probabilities and other factors to determine the average benefit to someone with a disease who takes the drug we are evaluating. We calculate that benefit over the course of the treatment, and end up with the increase in QALYs caused by the drug. The next thing we do is look at the costs to society as a result of each outcome. Most obviously we have to look at the cost of paying for the drug treatments, but then we also have to take into account the total cost of each possible outcome associated with both receiving treatment and not receiving treatment. For example, in eye-care, we also have to consider the costs to the healthcare system if a patient went blind, including personal assistance, patient education and continuing medical care. In this case, the blindness could have been caused by adverse effect of the drug or through not taking the drug at all. Once we have determined the costs we can calculate the cost per QALY, or, how much does it cost us to gain the equivalent of a year in perfect health for a patient. This cost per QALY becomes a standardized metric to evaluate new interventions The typical scenario is that a new intervention provides an improvement in the length or quality of life, but costs money. Then health economists and doctors argue it out as to whether government should pay for the intervention. Most governments fund things that cost less than $50,000 per QALY and do not pay for others that are more costly. It is a complex analysis and we have only brushed the surface, but I hope I have been able to give you a small glimpse into how health economists work and how their analysis helps us run our healthcare system with a reasoned approach.
Views: 54516 insidermedicine
Conducting Economic Research - Health Economic Analysis and Methods
 
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This presentation provides an overview of the types of economic evaluations in health care, the various economic perspectives studies can have, whose costs and benefits should be considered, and what measures of costs and effectiveness can be derived from Medicare datasets.
Views: 10894 ResDAC
CADTH Lecture — An Introduction to Health Economics by Scott Klarenbach, MD
 
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On November 28, 2016, Scott Klarenbach, MD, Professor and Clinician Scientist in the Department of Medicine at the University of Alberta, delivered an in-person and webinar lecture as part of the CADTH Lecture Series entitled “An Introduction to Health Economics.”
Views: 9786 CADTHACMTS
The use of Health Economics and Outcomes Research in Healthcare
 
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HOS 4-Minute-Training by Health Outcomes Strategies, GmbH www.health-os.com
Views: 23017 HealthOutcomesStrats
The Economics of Healthcare: Crash Course Econ #29
 
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Why is health care so expensive? Once again, there are a lot of factors in play. Jacob and Adriene look at the many reasons that health care in the US is so expensive, and what exactly we get for all that money. Spoiler alert: countries that spend less and get better results are not that uncommon. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 515848 CrashCourse
Joe Flower Explains Healthcare Economics In 5 Minutes
 
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(For more on what's behind the healthcare headlines, go to http://www.ImagineWhatIf.com) Healthcare Econ 101: Why it costs so much, yet we still don't get what we want and need—better healthcare that is cheaper. Joe: First rule of economics: people do what you pay them to do. Second rule of economics: people do exactly what you pay them to do. They really notice what it is. I’m sure that all of you know exactly what can get you fired, in some detail. And you know exactly what you can do in your jobs to really advance in your jobs, get better at it, make sure of a promotion, make sure they keep you on. You’re very, very clear on that. Well, so is everyone in the healthcare system. So are the doctors, the nurses, the hospitals, the device manufacturers, the pharmacy manufacturers—they’re very clear on what we’re paying them to do. If we’re not getting them the results that we want, it’s because we’re not clear on what we’re paying them to do. So, let’s look at Healthcare Econ 101. Traditional economics, we start with a buyer and a seller. I want to buy a rug, I go to the marketplace, there’s all these guys selling rugs. I haggle with them. If his price is too high, his quality is too low, I go to this guy over here and we come to some kind of agreement. Right? No problem. So, the market is—it’s what people talk about [as] a free market, where it’s kind of self-leveling. We arrive at what the actual value of that rug is in this market, at this time. Now what happens if you have an insurance supported, fee-for-service system? See, that actually names what we’re paying them for. If I go to a restaurant, am I paying someone to fry things or to put ice in them? No, I’m paying for a meal. I don’t care what they do back there to prepare it—a lot about it I [probably] don’t know how to do—but I’m paying for a meal. This is not what we’re doing. We’re paying fee-for-service. Now what happens in that fee-for-service system? Well, the first thing is the buyer gets split in two. The entity that’s paying for it becomes different from whoever that’s choosing it. What we’re saying—yes, we need an MRI here, we need a new hip, we—is not the person who is actually paying for that. Insurance supported, fee-for-service system. But there’s something—there’s a little complication. Who’s doing the choosing? It’s the patient and the provider, together. My doctor and I are doing the choosing, and someone else is paying for it. Or at least paying for most of it. But there’s another complication to this. What’s this? The seller is also the provider. So, the doctor’s also a salesman, in the sense that they’re selling their time—they’re doing fee-for-service—and they’re helping me make the choices. So, the usual feedback loops of a free market system, are not there. A lot of these changes that we’re seeing in the insurance system are attempts to put at least some of that feedback loop back in, so that the person making the decision have at least some of the payment. They have to do some of the payment themselves so we begin to do rational economic decisions, instead of just making them up out of thin air with the advice of the people who are actually going to do the service for us. So, it’s a very complicated problem. We try to control cost the entire time—and I’ve been in healthcare for 30 years—and I started around the time that they began trying to do various cost controls and basically, these cost controls have not worked. There is no evidence that we have controlled cost at all over all these years. So, what cost controls looked like over those many years—there’s been various, lots of different ways of controlling unit cost. We will only pay you so much to see a patient. We will only pay you so much for this drug. What happens—suppose you’re selling TVs. What happens if the market dictates in some way that the amount that you can charge on this TV is depressed? You can’t charge as much. What are you going to do? Woman: Sell more. Joe: Sell more. You’re going to make it up on volume. What’s the other thing that you’re going to do? You’re going to upsell. “You ma’am do not look like the type of person who could use a mere TV. You need a whole entertainment system! Five-sided sound! We got bass cabinets the size of a mini-bus for you.” You know? And you pay like $5800 for this huge thing. Does that sound like something that we’re doing in healthcare? Now, many of the new things that we can do that we couldn’t do twenty, thirty years ago, are very helpful. But not all of them. Some of them are not. And we don’t really have a mechanism in place for saying what is helpful and what’s not. The executives of the companies that you work in. the healthcare executives are being asked to do something they have no experience in doing. They have no training in it. They barely know what it means. They have difficulty seeing their way from where they sit, that they can do this: controlling system cost.
Views: 41400 Joe Flower
Economic Evaluation Webcast Part 5 of 5: Cost-Effectiveness Analysis
 
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This 5-part webcast series is designed to help you understand the value of economic evaluation and how to incorporate these methods into your heart disease and stroke prevention programs. This module shows outcomes in natural health units, such as the number of cardiovascular disease cases prevented or the number of lives saved. It will help you compare an intervention's costs to its outcomes in natural health units. Comments on this video are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/CommentPolicy.html This video can also be viewed at https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/videos/Economic-Evaluation-Part5-low-res.mp4
Intro to Health Economics part 1
 
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Basics of health economics providing knowledge regarding different techniques of health economics.
Views: 6898 Vikas G
Can Economics Help Us Build a Sustainable Health Care System?
 
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A talk by Michael E. Chernew, PhD, professor of health care policy, Harvard Medical School. Moderated by Freda C. Lewis-Hall, MD, DFAPA, executive vice president and chief medical officer, Pfizer, and member of the HMS Board of Fellows. Harvard Medical School MED-EDs are a series of short, thought-provoking presentations by renowned HMS faculty, alumni, and leadership volunteers built to share and inspire new ideas.
What is Cost Benefit and Cost Effectiveness Analysis? by Prof. Katherine Payne
 
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The process of generating information on the relative costs and benefits of a specific technology is called economic evaluation.New healthcare technologies must be funded from a constrained healthcare budget, which is generally set each year for a defined jurisdiction and population of current and future patients. Within this setting of scarcity, the introduction of a new technology will displace health-care technologies currently being used by patients in the health service. It is, therefore, important to identify and value both the benefits and costs of new technologies. Only by doing so, can decision-makers judge whether the use of scarce resources is appropriate. For more methods resources see: http://www.methods.manchester.ac.uk
Views: 22185 methodsMcr
Economic Evaluation Webcast Part 1 of 5: Introduction to Economic Evaluation
 
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This 5-part webcast series is designed to help you understand the value of economic evaluation and how to incorporate these methods into your heart disease and stroke prevention programs. This module provides an overview of economic evaluation and how it’s applicable to your program. Comments on this video are allowed in accordance with our comment policy: http://www.cdc.gov/SocialMedia/Tools/CommentPolicy.html This video can also be viewed at https://www.cdc.gov/dhdsp/videos/Economic-Evaluation-Part1-low-res.mp4
Simulation for Health Economics Analysis
 
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In this workshop Ron will discuss the benefits of discrete-event simulation for Health Economic investigations that are conducive for decision-making by payers and providers, and talk through a "Real-World" application example. Today more than ever governments and health providers are under extreme pressure to reduce costs while maintaining patient quality of life. Accuracy of information presented to them is critical for acceptance. This workshop will justify the use of discrete-event simulation by health economists as a means to provide accurate assessments of value for medical products or services.
Views: 4084 SIMUL8CORPORATION
Modelling and discounting in health economics
 
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Modelling and discounting in health economics - a lecture at london school of economics
Economic Analysis of Healthcare, Part 4: What’s a Sensible Approach?
 
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Malani concludes this discussion on the economics of health care by offering an approach to health care provision that includes risk rating for individuals, long-term contracts with incentives, and premium insurance for the sick and poor. See more at bfi.uchicago.edu/discussion-section
HEOR- Health Economics and Outcome Reseach
 
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These days every pharmaceutical manufacturers and developers feel a tremendous pricing pressure and regulatory restrictions. That's why these pharmaceutical companies are approaching the clinical and economic evidence providers. These stakeholders want to understand the product value completely, and it's potential to penetrate the market. For understanding real world clinical practice, they have started relying on health economics and outcome research (HEOR) information.  HEOR studies generate very useful data about the product which can advocate its easy market penetration. HEOR  generate following data for the value proposition of individual product: 1. Clinical efficacy 2. Real-world data 3. Patient quality of life (QoL) reports  4. Budget impact models  5. Cost-effectiveness models This data assist in the decision-making process. The value proposition for market access of a product includes following steps: 1. Value determination The clinical and economic value of product under market access observation get compared to the current benchmarks.  2. Value demonstration Economic models and clinical outcome research data are developed to demonstrate commercial and clinical elements for target value proposition. 3. Value communication The value of the product is then informed to the relevant audience. 4. Value realization In this step, the price range is defined. This is a critical step for market access regarding reimbursement and seamless market penetration. For more details visit my website https://heorgps.blogspot.com
Views: 3005 naveen sharma
Health Matters: What health economic tools and resources have PHE made available?
 
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Discussion between health economics experts. Health Matters collection page: http://bit.ly/Healthmatters
What is a QALY?
 
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This video is from https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/valuing-health ‘Measuring and Valuing Health’ is a free online course by The University of Sheffield available on FutureLearn.com In this video, Katherine demonstrates how to calculate Quality Adjusted Life Years or QALYs; a unit of benefit that can be used to assess the extent of the benefits gained from a variety of healthcare interventions. To calculate QALYs, we multiply the length of life expected to be gained by the new treatment or invention by the quality of life a patient can expect to have. Quality of life is measured on a 0 - 1 scale and this score represents the value of different levels of health. #FLValuingHealth At FutureLearn, we want to inspire learning for life. We offer a diverse selection of free, high quality online courses from some of the world's leading universities and other outstanding cultural institutions. Browse all courses and sign up here: http://www.futurelearn.com
Views: 19963 FutureLearn
Cost-Benefit Discounting
 
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This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. In this video, you will learn why you discount the future in cost-benefit analysis. Concepts include discount rates, weighted average discount rates, economic opportunity costs of capital and financial vs. economic discount rates. To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out: http://www.conservation-strategy.org/ For copyright information on all sound effects, see http://www.conservation-strategy.org/en/page/csf-economic-video-lessons-sound-references
Economic Analysis of Health Care and Social Security (D1211) - Full Video
 
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From the University of Chicago’s Economics Department, Professors Casey Mulligan and Kevin M. Murphy analyze health care and social security from an economics perspective. ©2003/40 min. Check out our Facebook page here: https://www.facebook.com/FreeToChooseNetwork Visit our media website to find other programs here: http://freetochoosemedia.org/index.php Connect with us on Twitter here: https://twitter.com/FreeToChooseNet Learn more about our company here: http://freetochoosenetwork.org Shop for related products here: http://www.freetochoose.net Stream from FreeToChoose.TV here: http://freetochoose.tv
KEYSTONE / Module 5 / Session 1: Basic Principles of Health Economics
 
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KEYSTONE HPSR Initiative// Module 5: Economic analysis //Session 1: Basic Principles of Health Economics This is the first video session of Module 5: Economic analysis, of the KEYSTONE Teaching and Learning Resources for Health Policy and Systems Research Click here to access videos sessions and slides for all modules: http://bit.ly/25vVVp1 Module 5: Economic analysis An economist’s approach to understanding and studying health systems problems is underpinned by principles of economic reasoning such as: How does one make a rational choice? Is it efficient? Is it equitable? What is the trade-off between efficiency and equity? And is it cost-effective? These principles of reasoning can be applied to a range of questions around the production of health and health services, demand and supply of health services, principal-agent relationships, and incentive mechanisms in health systems. This module outlines the basic concepts of economics (opportunity cost, factors influencing demand and supply of health care, how does market function etc.) stimulates the participants to think about the debates about failure of market in health care and the role of the Government and give an overview about costing of health care programs and role of economic evaluation in health care. There are 4 videos in this module. Module 5: Economic analysis -Module 5 Session 1: Basic Principles of Health Economics https://youtu.be/aAK-mASalz0 -Module 5 Session 2: Microeconomics for Health https://youtu.be/eldmRCjxLjg -Module 5 Session 3: Economic Evaluation https://youtu.be/TpHBYsRynQQ -Module 5 Session 4: Economic Evaluation and Recap https://youtu.be/1xf5JI2s-io The other modules in this series are: Module 1: Introducing Health Systems & Health Policy Module 2: Social justice, equity & gender Module 3: System complexity Module 4: Health Policy and Systems Research frameworks Module 6: Policy analysis Module 7: Realist evaluation Module 8: Systems thinking Module 9: Ethnography Module 10: Implementation research Module 11: Participatory action research Module 12: Knowledge translation Module 13: Preparing a Research Plan Click here to access videos sessions and slides for all modules: http://bit.ly/25vVVp1 KEYSTONE is a collective initiative of several Indian health policy and systems research (HPSR) organizations to strengthen national capacity in HPSR towards addressing critical needs of health systems and policy development. KEYSTONE is convened by the Public Health Foundation of India in its role as Nodal Institute of the Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research (AHPSR). The inaugural KEYSTONE short course was conducted in New Delhi from 23 February – 5 March 2015. In the process of delivering the inaugural course, a suite of teaching and learning materials were developed under Creative Commons license, and are being made available as open access resources. The KEYSTONE teaching and learning resources include 38 videos and 32 slide presentations organized into 13 modules. These materials cover foundational concepts, common approaches used in HPSR, and guidance for preparing a research plan. These resources were created and are made available through support and funding from the Alliance for Health Policy & Systems Research (AHPSR), WHO for the KEYSTONE initiative.
Views: 3765 PHFICHANNEL
The Economics of Health & Safety
 
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We have all been guilty at some point of ignoring Health and Safety signs, on the road or in our offices and places of work. but it does play a role in our economic growth. So in this edition of Real Economy we head to Spain to understand the economics of health and safety with the European Agency for Safety and health at work, better known as OSHA, and look at an industry which sees the biggest issues. Then we will head to Belgium to understand how companies and employees are innovating to en… READ MORE : http://www.euronews.com/2016/03/07/the-economics-of-health-safety euronews business brings you latest updates from the world of finance and economy, in-depth analysis, interviews, infographics and more Subscribe for daily dose of business news: http://bit.ly/1pcHCzj Made by euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe.
Views: 596 euronews Business
Cost Effective Analysis CEA
 
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The breakdown of a Cost Effective Analysis CEA
Views: 26872 Bobbie Kite
Health Economics and Outcomes Research in the Era of Value-Based Care and the 21st Century Cures Act
 
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A panel discussion focused on how the 21st Cures Act has increased focus on real-world evidence (RWE), from an educational symposium sponsored by Cardinal Health during the 22nd Annual ISPOR International Meeting. Within oncology, regulatory issues limit clinical trial participation to 3% of cancer patients who differ from the real-world population. However, RWE is criticized for inadequacies in validating drug label expansions. New methods to address these challenges are discussed.
Views: 471 Cardinal Health
Probabilistic Sensitivity Analysis for Health Economic Evaluation using R
 
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Probabilistic Sensitivity Analysis for Health Economic Evaluation using R R script used https://app.box.com/s/zmppncajgwbt6apfcoqk9r0vospdmdl2
Views: 294 Stat Pharm
Discussion Section: Economic Analysis of Healthcare, Part 2 - Challenges with Community Rating
 
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In this episode, Murphy and Malani discuss the adverse selection that occurs when all people are required to get insurance and pay the same rates, regardless of their health status. See more at bfi.uchicago.edu/discussion-section
Intro to Cost-Benefit Analysis
 
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This video is a part of Conservation Strategy Fund's collection of environmental economic lessons and was made possible thanks to the support of the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation and the Marcia Brady Tucker Foundation. This series is for individuals who want to learn - or review - the basic economics of conservation. In this video, you will be introduced to the concept of a cost benefit analysis. You will learn the difference between decision making from the perspective of a private firm vs. a larger society and how this applies to environmental conservation. To follow this series, subscribe to our YouTube channel. For more information on these and other trainings from Conservation Strategy Fund, check out: http://www.conservation-strategy.org/ For copyright information on all sound effects, see http://www.conservation-strategy.org/en/page/csf-economic-video-lessons-sound-references
Health Economics Part-01
 
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Public Health Planning fo Hearing Impairment- Workshop 13-17 October, 2014 organized IIPH-Hyerabad Lecture by Dr.B R Shamanna
Views: 1813 Singamala Sreedhar
Part 3: Economic Evaluation and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis in HIV Research
 
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Estimating Value for Money: Incorporating Economic Evaluation and Cost-Effectiveness Analysis into HIV Research David Dowdy, MD B. Frank and Kathleen Polk Assistant Professor Department of Epidemiology Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health June 11, 2015
Views: 993 Hopkins CFAR
Cost utility analysis
 
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This video describes cost utility analysis, which is a type of full economic analysis. The video is a screencast of a section of an online learning module on health economics. Materials for this module have been developed in collaboration between the University of Portsmouth, Cochrane UK and members of the wider Cochrane community. The development of these materials has been funded by Cochrane, the Higher Education Innovation Fund (University of Portsmouth), and the Faculty of Science, University of Portsmouth. Lead programmer: Will Maltby. Lead storyboard developer for the module: Ian Shemilt, Luke Vale and Ann Dewey. With additional input from: Jerry Collingwood, Tara Dean, Amy Drahota, Carolyne Jacobs, Sally Kilburn and Marialena Trivella. Voice-over: Rebecca Harris. Video animations and additional graphics: Rob Shaw of Frank Floyd Animation. Methodological peer review and input: Ian Shemilt, Luke Vale and Miranda Mugford. Thanks to all those who helped with piloting and provided feedback on their experiences.
Views: 1187 Cochrane Training
Certification Programme in Fundamentals of Health Economics and Outcomes Research (HEOR)
 
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This course will take you through the fundamentals and basic concepts of Health Economics and Outcomes Research (HEOR), Health Technology Assessment (HTA), Real World Evidence (RWE), Patient Reported Outcomes (PROs). Economic Modelling and Pricing Reimbursement and Market Access (PRMA) Course Convener - MarksMan Academy of Health Sciences Certified by: Kalam Institute of Health Technology (KIHT) Academy page - https://goo.gl/xLiNxq Enroll here - https://goo.gl/tas2g1 Drop us an e-mail on [email protected], if you wish to get enrolled for the course!
Views: 525 marksmanhealthcare
Marginal Analysis, Roller Coasters, Elasticity, and Van Gogh: Crash Course Econ #18
 
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This week Jacob and Adriene teach you about marginal analysis, which you're using RIGHT NOW! The video is coming from inside the house! Or something. You'll learn how marginal analysis guides the decision making if cities, nations, companies, and amusement park enthusiasts. We'll also look at the idea of elasticity, and what people are willing to pay for certain stuff based on the supply. Why is a Van Gogh worth more than an OBEY poster? (hint: it's because they're still cranking out the OBEY posters, and Vincent is dead) All this and more on Crash Course Economics! *** Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Eric Kitchen, Jessica Wode, Jeffrey Thompson, Steve Marshall, Moritz Schmidt, Robert Kunz, Tim Curwick, Jason A Saslow, SR Foxley, Elliot Beter, Jacob Ash, Christian, Jan Schmid, Jirat, Christy Huddleston, Daniel Baulig, Chris Peters, Anna-Ester Volozh, Ian Dundore, Caleb Weeks -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 447602 CrashCourse
Health Economics_2
 
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http://www.pcp.onlinemindanao.com Health economics is a logical and explicit framework to aid health care workers, decision-makers, government or society at large to make choices on how to best use resources. All healthcare workers are involved in making decisions about resource allocation everyday, many times a day. in the Philippines where health expenditure is mainly out-of-pocket, the doctors acts as a health economist and guides the patient on which interventions would yield maximum results for his patient's budget. With the increasing number of options for diagnostic or therapeutic interventions and the increasing size of a family's budgetary allocation for health, familiarity with the different methods of economic evaluation has become very useful. The 4 main methods of economic evaluation are cost-benifit, cost-minimization, cost-effectiveness and cost-utility analysis. These methods examine one (or more) possible interventions and compare the inputs or resources necessary to carry out such interventions with their consequences and effects. The various methods of economic evaluation differ in the way they itemize and value inputs and consequences. Cost-benifit analysis express both the inputs and consequences in monetary terms. Cost-minimization analysis can be carried out if the consequences or interventions are the same and only the inputs are taken into consideration. The aim is to decide the cheapest way to achieve the same outcome. Cost-effectiveness analysis can be carried out when the consequences of different interventions vary but can be measured in identical units and inputs are costed. Competing interventions are compared in terms of cost per unit consequence. Cost-utility analysis can be carried out when the consequences are expressed in terms of quality and quantity of life. Of these, cost-minimization analysis is the easiest to apply when making decisions at the bedside or in the clinic. Faced with different options for his patients, the doctor acts as a manager and based on the baseline risk of his patient, ranks the different options in terms of relative risk reduction, absolute risk reduction and cost of treatment, recommends the interventions suited to the patient's budget by explaining the options in terms the patient can understand then shares the decision-making with the patient.
Views: 1263 richel091250
Master of Public Health: Health Economics and Economic Evaluation
 
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Here in this video, Dr Arthur Hsuehtalks about the Health Economics and Economic Evaluation specialisation. To find out more, visit http://mdhs-study.unimelb.edu.au/degrees/master-of-public-health/degree-structure#health-economics-and-economic-evaluation-200-point-sample-study-plan-with-research-project-capstone-option
Supply and Demand: Crash Course Economics #4
 
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In which Adriene Hill and Jacob Clifford teach you about one of the fundamental economic ideas, supply and demand. What is supply and demand? Well, you’ll have to watch the video to really understand it, but it’s kind of important for everything economically. Supply and demand sets prices, and indicates to manufacturers how much to produce. Also, it has a lot to do with strawberries. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Mark, Jan Schmid, Simun Niclasen, Robert Kunz, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Eric Kitchen, Christian, Beatrice Jin, Anna-Ester Volozh, Eric Knight, Elliot Beter, Jeffrey Thompson, Ian Dundore, Stephen Lawless, Today I Found Out, James Craver, Jessica Wode, Sandra Aft, Jacob Ash, SR Foxley, Christy Huddleston, Steve Marshall, Chris Peters Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 1562953 CrashCourse
Trends in Health Economics and Outcomes Research
 
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Key opinion leader, Donald Patrick, PhD, MSPH, discusses trends in health economics and outcomes research.
Views: 1461 ISPORorg
Exploring "Health Economics:" What it Means to You and Your Health Care 7/15/13
 
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Across the Fence is the longest-running locally-produced program in the US. We have been on-air on WCAX-TV since 1955! Across the Fence is produced by the University of Vermont Extension. Visit http://www.uvm.edu/extension/atfence
Views: 1666 A.T. Fence
HM731 - Economic Evaluation in Health Care
 
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Year 3 option in Master of Health Management Program
Discussion Section: Economic Analysis of Health Insurance, Part 1 - ACA / Obamacare
 
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Murphy and Malani broadly describe and discuss the primary impact of the ACA on health care provision, as well as legislative attempts to roll back growth in Medicaid expenditures. See more at bfi.uchicago.edu/discussion-section
Intro to Economic Evaluation of Health Technology
 
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Gerald Kominski, PhD Professor, Fielding School of Public Health Director, UCLA Center for Health Policy Research Cost-effectiveness analysis (CEA) is a commonly used technique for assessing whether the additional costs associated with a wide variety of interventions, including health care technologies, are reasonable to achieve improvement in outcomes. Because market mechanisms often don’t work properly in health care settings to separate cost-effective from cost-ineffective technologies, CEA is now widely used to improve the allocation of increasingly scarce resources. This module provides an introduction to CEA, including why health care markets rely on CEA rather than market competition, and how CEA differs from other methods of economic evaluation (such as cost-benefit analysis). Participants will also learn about the structure of generic CEA models that are frequently used in medical settings, and a general framework for conducting CEA, including how to identify appropriate costs for inclusion in such analyses. For information on other CTSI events, visit http://www.ctsi.ucla.edu
Views: 2445 UCLA CTSI
Retrospective on Health Economics by Dr. Kenneth Arrow
 
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Bruce Hollingsworth interviews Dr. Kenneth Arrow. This video focuses on one portion of a larger interview. This video is available publicly with permission from both Dr. Arrow and Dr. Hollingsworth.
Views: 3123 iheacongress

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