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Word Analysis – Structure of words (Morphology)
 
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Subject:Linguistics Paper: Introduction to Computational Linguistics and Speech processing
Views: 86 Vidya-mitra
An Introduction to Morphology
 
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An introduction to morphology in linguistics describing morphemes, bound morphemes, free morphemes, content words, function words, bound roots, affixes, and the like. Plus Power Rangers.
Views: 188328 The Linguistics Channel
English Sentence Structure - English Grammar Lesson
 
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In this lesson, you can learn about sentence structure in English. You’ll learn how to construct all kinds of sentences in English, from the simplest possible sentences, to long, complex sentences which contain many different ideas. Practice using correct sentence structure and post your example sentences in the comments! See the full version of this lesson on our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/sentence-structure. In this lesson, you'll learn: - How to build simple sentences. - Using compliments. - Adding onto simple sentences to create more detailed sentence structure. - How to add description to your sentence. - How to make complex sentences with independent clauses. - How to make complex sentences with dependent clauses. Contents: 1. How to Build a Simple Sentence 0:32 2. Complements - What Comes Next? 2:58 3. Adding Description to Your Sentences 8:43 4. How to Make Complex Sentences with Independent Clauses 11:41 5. How to Make Complex Sentences with Dependent Clauses 15:36 To see more free English lessons like this one, visit our website: https://www.oxfordonlineenglish.com/.
Views: 588844 Oxford Online English
National 5 English - Analysis Questions - Sentence Structure
 
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National 5 English analysis questions that focus on sentence structure require you to know the different techniques that are used in sentence structure: repetition, word order, lists, climax, anti-climax and more. All available on the website - www.myetutor.tv
Views: 2423 myetutor
Syntax (Part 1)
 
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A brief overview of lexical categories, phrase structure rules, and syntactic tree structures.
Views: 227843 Evan Ashworth
Natural Language Processing: Crash Course Computer Science #36
 
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Today we’re going to talk about how computers understand speech and speak themselves. As computers play an increasing role in our daily lives there has been an growing demand for voice user interfaces, but speech is also terribly complicated. Vocabularies are diverse, sentence structures can often dictate the meaning of certain words, and computers also have to deal with accents, mispronunciations, and many common linguistic faux pas. The field of Natural Language Processing, or NLP, attempts to solve these problems, with a number of techniques we’ll discuss today. And even though our virtual assistants like Siri, Alexa, Google Home, Bixby, and Cortana have come a long way from the first speech processing and synthesis models, there is still much room for improvement. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Want to know more about Carrie Anne? https://about.me/carrieannephilbin The Latest from PBS Digital Studios: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1mtdjDVOoOqJzeaJAV15Tq0tZ1vKj7ZV Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - https://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrash... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 168207 CrashCourse
Learn English Grammar: The Sentence
 
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http://www.engvid.com Do you know how to build a sentence in English? In this lesson, you will learn the basic parts of a simple sentence, or independent clause. Knowing this will make it easier to understand any sentence in written English. Understanding how these different parts of a sentence work together to form meaning will help you write better in English. The knowledge in this lesson is essential for any 'Independent User' or 'Proficient User' of English. Quiz yourself here: http://www.engvid.com/english-grammar-the-sentence/ TRANSCRIPT Hi again. I'm Adam. Welcome back to www.engvid.com. Today I have a very important lesson, I think, for all of you that will help you very much with your reading, but especially your writing skills. Okay? Today we're going to look at the sentence. What is a sentence? Now, I know that all of you are saying: "Well, we know what a sentence is. We've learned this a thousand times before." Right? I know what you've learned and I know what you haven't learned, many of you; some of you have, of course. The sentence has a very basic structure, there's a very basic component that must be involved or included in a sentence, and a lot of grammar teachers, a lot of English teachers don't teach this. Okay? All of you, I'm sure have by now heard of "SVO", but have you heard of "SVsC"? Have you heard of "SVC"? Maybe yes, maybe no. But I'm sure a lot of you are going: "What? I've never heard of these things before." Well, we're going to talk about this in one second. Before we talk about a sentence, we have to talk about a clause. Now, what is a clause? I'm sure you've heard this word before as well, but just in case, a clause is any subject, verb combination. It's a group of words that must include a subject and a verb. Now, also very important to remember: it must be a tense verb, meaning that it must take a time; past, present, future. Okay? No base verb, no infinitive verb. So that is a clause. Now, there are two types of clauses. Okay? We have independent clauses and we have dependent clauses. The... These are sometimes called subordinate clauses. Now, every sentence in English to be a grammatically correct sentence must have an independent clause. It doesn't need a dependent clause, but it could have one. The independent clause could include a dependent clause as the subject or object. We'll talk about that after. So an independent clause has a subject and a verb, and it can stand by itself. It can contain a complete idea by itself. Okay? So, technically, the shortest sentence you can have in English will be a... Will be an independent clause with a subject and verb. What is the absolute shortest sentence that you can think of? Think of a sentence, the shortest you can possibly make it. Okay? Here's an example: "Go!" Is this a complete English sentence? Yes. Why? Because it contains an independent clause. Where? We have the implied subject: "you" and the tense verb: "go", the imperative tense "go". So this your basic English sentence. Now, we have three other types, three basic types and we can of course play with these after. Subject, verb, object. Some independent clauses must have an object, we'll talk about that in a second. Excuse me. Subject, verb, subject complement. Some sentences must have a subject complement. Subject, verb, complement. Okay? We're going to talk about each of these in a moment. I have the "A" here because quite often, this complement is actually an adverb phrase or an adverbial. We'll talk about that in a second. So your basic sentence can be any one of these three. Now, the reason we're looking at this... All these structures is because once you understand what must be contained in a sentence, then you can read any English sentence out there that is grammatically correct and be able to understand the main idea of that sentence. Okay? So let's start with "SVO". Okay, let's look at our "SVO" type of independent clause: subject, verb, object. Now, first, what is an object? Well, we have two types of objects to talk about. We have the direct object, we have the indirect object. Now, the thing to understand is that the object always answers a question about the verb, it completes the meaning of the verb by asking the questions: "What?" or: "Who?" Now, keep in mind that technically, it's: "Whom?" But if you say: "Who?" I'll let it go this time. Okay? Formal academic writing, "Whom?", "Whom?", "Whom?" IELTS, TOEFL, SAT, all that - "Whom?" not: "Who?" In the object position. But the direct object answers: "What?" or: "Who?" about the verb. Okay? We'll get back to that.
How to Make a Text Summarizer - Intro to Deep Learning #10
 
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I'll show you how you can turn an article into a one-sentence summary in Python with the Keras machine learning library. We'll go over word embeddings, encoder-decoder architecture, and the role of attention in learning theory. Code for this video (Challenge included): https://github.com/llSourcell/How_to_make_a_text_summarizer Jie's Winning Code: https://github.com/jiexunsee/rudimentary-ai-composer More Learning resources: https://www.quora.com/Has-Deep-Learning-been-applied-to-automatic-text-summarization-successfully https://research.googleblog.com/2016/08/text-summarization-with-tensorflow.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Automatic_summarization http://deeplearning.net/tutorial/rnnslu.html http://machinelearningmastery.com/text-generation-lstm-recurrent-neural-networks-python-keras/ Please subscribe! And like. And comment. That's what keeps me going. Join us in the Wizards Slack channel: http://wizards.herokuapp.com/ And please support me on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3191693 Follow me: Twitter: https://twitter.com/sirajraval Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/sirajology Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval/ Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/sirajraval/ Signup for my newsletter for exciting updates in the field of AI: https://goo.gl/FZzJ5w
Views: 144610 Siraj Raval
Rhyme: Why Eminem is one of the most impressive lyricists ever
 
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Please consider checking out my blog: http://lofalexandria.com/ or following me on twitter: https://twitter.com/lofalexandria I tried to find this amazing video breaking down Eminem's rhymes for a discussion on reddit about Eminem and it had been removed from youtube after the creator's youtube channel was closed down. Thought I would re-upload for everyone to enjoy. The channel this video was originally from was closed due to some legal trouble for the creator: http://www.dailydot.com/news/youtube-mike-lombardo-arrested-fbi-child-porn/ I figured there is no harm in uploading it again since it is not likely he is going to be back on the web any time soon to reupload himself.
Views: 3033457 Library of Alexandria
How to Write a Good Argumentative Essay: Logical Structure
 
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https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays This is a sample video from a full video tutorial course that teaches you how to improve your academic essay writing. The course is hosted on Udemy. To learn more, preview a selection of videos, and get a HUGE DISCOUNT on the signup price, click the link below: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays Many students enter college without the skills necessary to succeed simply because they were never properly taught how to write essays. This course aims to overcome this problem by offering a systemic framework for essay writing that removes the mystery and presents a clear path for moving from idea to outline to completed first draft. TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1: WELCOME AND INTRODUCTION A Brief Introduction to the Course SECTION 2: WHY ARE WRITING SKILLS SO IMPORTANT? Good Writers Rule the World SECTION 3: WHAT IS THE MOST EFFICIENT WAY TO IMPROVE MY ESSAY WRITING? The Craft of Writing from 20,000 Feet The Most Efficient Way to Dramatically Improve Your Essay Writing Introduction, Main Body, Conclusion: Why Are Essays Written This Way? How Essay Style is Related to Essay Structure SECTION 4: HOW SHOULD I APPROACH THE WRITING PROCESS? Writing for Discovery versus Writing for Presentation Why Rewriting is Important (And Why Students Don’t Think So) How to Deal with Writer’s Anxiety and Writer’s Block SECTION 5: WHAT IS MY IDEAL WRITING WORKFLOW? The Right Way to Think About Outlining My Ideal Writing Workflow Tools for Mind-Mapping, Outlining and Drafting The Writing Tools I Use: A Quick Introduction to Scrivener SECTION 6: WHAT DOES A STRUCTURED APPROACH TO ESSAY WRITING LOOK LIKE? Two Kinds of Structure to Keep in Mind A Structured Approach to Essay Writing Using Scrivener A Short Essay Demo Using a Structured Essay Writing Template SECTION 7: FOLLOW ALONG AS I WRITE A REAL COLLEGE ESSAY FROM START TO FINISH Part1: The Assignment Part 2: Initial Research Part 3: Outlining Part 4: Drafts Part 5: References and Citations SECTION 8: HOW CAN I IMPROVE MY WRITING STYLE? The Number One Misconception About Writing Style Oratorical Style, Prophetic Style and Romantic Style Practical Style, Reflexive Style and Academic Style Classic Style: Prose as a Window Into the World Classic Style as an Antidote to Bad Writing SECTION 9: HOW TO WRITE A GOOD ARGUMENTATIVE ESSAY The Minimal Five-Part Structure of a Good Argumentative Essay Writing the Introduction Writing the Conclusion The Essay: “Should Teachers Be Allowed to Ban Laptops in Classrooms? Analysis: The Introduction Analysis: First Argument Analysis: Second Argument Analysis: Third Argument Analysis of the Main Body: Evaluation and Recommendations Analysis: Conclusion The Essay: An Improved Version SECTION 10: WHAT IS PLAGIARISM AND HOW CAN I AVOID IT? What is Plagiarism? Downloading and Buying Whole Papers Cutting and Pasting from Several Sources Changing Some Words But Copying Whole Phrases Paraphrasing Without Attribution The Debate Over Patchwriting SECTION 11: HOW SHOULD I CITE SOURCES IN MY ESSAY? When Should I Cite a Source? What Needs to be Cited? How to Cite: Mark the Boundaries Citing Exact Words Citing a Longer Quotation Citing a Source But Not Quoting Do I Have to Cite Information That is “Common Knowledge”? Citation Styles: MLA, APA, Chicago, Turabian, oh my! SECTION 12: WRAPPING UP Thank You GET A HUGE DISCOUNT ON THIS COURSE: https://kevindelaplante.com/how-to-write-essays SUBSCRIBE: https://www.youtube.com/user/philosophyfreak?sub_confirmation=1
Views: 800074 Kevin deLaplante
Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide
 
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The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark Nb: it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 689568 Kent Löfgren
Drumstep Song Analysis and Structure - Part 1
 
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So yeah, I was sitting around and didn't know what to record so I just talked about one of my drumstep tunes for half an hour. The Song: http://soundcloud.com/dorincourt/london-nebel-nasty-anthem http://youtu.be/2YePjiByk4U Patch Downloads: http://goo.gl/YDEXX ---------------------------------- Show your support: Soundcloud: http://bit.ly/teOn0v Facebook: http://on.fb.me/tvNOmw YouTube: http://bit.ly/nd1jDv Twitter: http://bit.ly/sM5Kgh Website: http://bit.ly/qtotpA ---------------------------------- Please subscribe for more tutorials and free stuff, as well as more tunes. Also, please spread the word as much as possible, it's much appreciated :)
Views: 15233 Dorincourt
In Defense of Genthru: An Analysis of Hunter x Hunter's Arc Structure - Part 2 of 2: Themes/Villains
 
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Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/Aleczandxr Twitter: https://twitter.com/aleczandxr MAL: https://myanimelist.net/profile/Aleczandxr In case you'd like to make a donation into my tip jar: http://www.paypal.me/aleczandxr My side channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCWH2wp-stxbcz0H6_bUwgJA Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SKu7WHWMDH4 IF YOU WANT SOME HUNTER X HUNTER STUFF: --- Order the latest volume of the Hunter x Hunter manga: http://amzn.to/2DVqZIZ Buy Hunter x Hunter 2011 Volume 1 (Episodes 1-12) on Blu-Ray: http://amzn.to/2ElKwAd Buy Hunter x Hunter 2011 Volume 2 (Episodes 14-26) on Blu-Ray: http://amzn.to/2rOy9dc Buy Hunter x Hunter 2011 Volume 3 (Episodes 27-50) on Blu-Ray: http://amzn.to/2DKbb8G Order the Hunter x Hunter manga: http://amzn.to/2EmQRvi My equipment: --- The microphone I use: http://amzn.to/2E0qrSt My computer: http://amzn.to/2EmTwoM The editing software I use (full version): http://amzn.to/2DXnEJz The external hard drive I use: http://amzn.to/2EmvNoN Music used: Song 1 - Life Goes On (Persona 5) Song 2 - Movement in Green (Final Fantasy X) Song 3 - To Give a Marionette Life (HxH 2011) Song 4 - L's Theme B (Death Note) Song 5 - Corridors of Time (Chrono Trigger) Song 6 - Forest of the Nopon (Day) (Xenoblade Chronicles) Song 7 - Konpaku No Elegy (HxH 1999)
Views: 86618 Aleczandxr
What is Linguistics? | Definition and Branches of Linguistics
 
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What is Linguistics? | Definition and Branches of Linguistics: Linguistics is the scientific study of language, specifically language form, language meaning, and language in context. Linguistics is that particular science which studies the origin, organization, nature and development of language descriptively, historically, comparatively, explicitly and formulates the general rules related to language. Now, let’s discuss some of the branches of linguistics. General linguistics is a study of the phenomena, historical changes, and functions of language without restriction to a particular language or to a particular aspect of language such as phonetics, grammar and stylistics. Descriptive linguistics is the work of objectively analyzing and describing how language is actually used (or how it was used in the past) by a group of people in a speech community. It deals with a particular language in a specific time and in a specific community. Diachronic linguistics is also called historical linguistics. It is the scientific study of language change over time. It studies language change, history of words, history of speech communities and develops general theories about how and why language changes. Comparative linguistics is a branch of historical linguistics that is concerned with comparing languages to establish their historical relatedness. It compares two languages and establishes relationships between them. This comparison is generally done between the languages which are related to each other. Theoretical linguistics studies language to construct theories of their structure and functions. It is not concerned with practical applications. Applied linguistics studies language to apply the concepts and findings of linguistics to practical tasks including English language teaching. It covers both general and descriptive linguistics. Phonetics is a branch of linguistics that comprises the study of the sounds of human speech. It is concerned with the physical properties of speech sounds or sign, their physiological production, acoustic properties, auditory perception, and NEUROPHYSIOLOGICAL STATUS. Phonology, on the other hand, is concerned with the abstract and grammatical characterization of systems of sounds or signs. It has traditionally focused largely on the study of the systems of phonemes in particular languages (and therefore used to be also called PHONEMICS or PHONEMATICS. MORPHOLOGY is the study of words, how they are formed, and their relationship to other words in the same language. It analyzes the structure of words and parts of words, such as stems, root words, prefixes, and suffixes. ........................................................................... Sources: www.wikipedia.com Webster Dictionary Evgeny Teilor, https://www.jamendo.com/track/1176656/oceans Image Sources: www.pixabay.com www.openclipart.com ...................................................................................................... Tags: what is linguistics linguistics definition branches of linguistics define linguistics
Views: 114711 English Literature Hub
Screenplay structure with character arc and more
 
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To watch the movie Legally Blonde on Amazon: http://amzn.to/2uSlaUv Screenplay structure is usually discussed as a plot template like Save the Cat, The Hero's Journey or basic three act structure with act breaks, climax, etc. Here I am going to talk about how you can start with character and character arc and use that to flesh out your plot. It's a more right-brained, character driven way to think about your story. You give your screenplay structure through character arc as opposed to external plot. You can still use other structure templates and plotting along with these character techniques for script structure. Screenwriting books and resources from the video: My Story Can Beat Up Your Story: Ten Ways to Toughen Up Your Screenplay from Opening Hook to Knockout Punch http://amzn.to/2rDTB3j Jeffrey Alan Sheckter youtube video- How to Write a Screenplay: Bulletproof Structure from a Working Hollywood Writer https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Hn-fFRUXXk Jeffrey Alan Sheckter's Udemy courses: https://www.udemy.com/user/jeffreyschechter/ Story: Substance, Structure, Style and the Principles of Screenwriting by Robert McKee http://amzn.to/2ozizz9 The Complete Writer's Guide to Heroes and Heroines: Sixteen Master Archetypes (new version has a different cover) http://amzn.to/2oYZS8Q Legally Blonde copyright of MGM Click here for free and paid online classes to help you write your best screenplay: http://www.screenwritingclassesonline.com Screenplay coverage by Word Dancer: https://screenwritingclassesonline.thinkific.com/pages/services
SIMPLE, COMPOUND, COMPLEX SENTENCES - with Examples, Exercises - Sentence Clause Structure - Grammar
 
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Learn the difference between SIMPLE, COMPOUND, and COMPLEX sentences, and how to us them correctly. ***** RELATED LESSONS ***** 1. PUNCTUATION Masterclass - Learn Punctuation Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bY5ChVDRLus 2. Learn ALL TENSES Easily in 30 Minutes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3lI3R9_Z1HY 3. MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English & How to Avoid Them: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI 4. HAVE BEEN / HAS BEEN / HAD BEEN: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QhSqfzaMuLM 5. All GRAMMAR lessons: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 6. How to Become Fluent in English: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsI6vWZkm3W_VE7cWtYVjix
Views: 383018 Learn English Lab
Sentence Structure: How to Write a Memorable Sentence І The Great Courses
 
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You explore the myriad ways in which we think about, talk about, and write sentences. You discover insights into what makes for pleasurable reading. You also learn how you can apply these methods to your own writing. Try a Free Trial of The Great Courses Plus and watch Building Great Sentences: Exploring the Writer's Craft here: https://www.thegreatcoursesplus.com/show/building_great_sentences_exploring_the_writers_craft?utm_source=US_OnlineVideo&utm_medium=SocialMediaEditorialYouTube&utm_campaign=136230 Recently, I asked the students in my Prose Style class to think of memorable first sentences from novels. The results were actually a little disappointing, as almost everyone in the class came up with the same two or three first sentences, but only a couple of students could think of more than that. Of course, "Call me Ishmael" made almost everyone's list. "This is the saddest story I have ever heard," the very revealing sentence with which John Dowell opens Ford Maddox Ford's The Good Soldier popped up on several lists. Not surprisingly, the one opening line everyone in the class remembered was "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times," that supremely balanced sentence that begins A Tale of Two Cities. Dickens made that opening so memorable by exploiting in just a few words almost all the strategies of syntactic balance: "It was the" before the comma is mirrored by "it was the" after the comma, and the fact that each clause starts with the same words exploits the classical rhetorical trope of anaphora. The first clause ends with "times," as does the second clause, exploiting the classical rhetorical trope of epistrophe, and that both first and last words of these two clauses are the same makes it an example of yet another rhetorical trope, symploce. The only difference between the first clause and the second clause is that the word best before the comma is changed to worst after the comma, creating a simple but effective antithesis. It's hard to imagine a more perfectly balanced sentence! What my students did not remember is that "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times" is not the first sentence of A Tale of Two Cities but is instead only the first of a string of balanced clauses and conceptual balances that combine to form a first sentence that keeps on going for 118 words. And Dickens doesn't stop there, following this superbly balanced long sentence with even more balances. There were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a plain face, on the throne of England; there were a king with a large jaw and a queen with a fair face, on the throne of France. In both countries it was clearer than crystal to the lords of the State preserves of loaves and fishes, that things in general were settled for ever. Dickens balances the English king with a large jaw against the French king with a large jaw, the English queen with a plain face against the French queen with a fair face, the throne of England against the throne of France. Then in the next sentence, he exploits the duple rhythm of clearer than crystal and the pairing of loaves and fishes and creates a subtle parallel between the three-word phrase things in genera" and the three-word phrase settled for ever. One can almost imagine Dickens performing these sentences, emphasizing their on the one hand/on the other hand structure with the regularity of a metronome: this/that, this/that, this/that. What makes this famous opening of Dickens's novel so memorable is variously referred to as its balanced form, or its extended parallelism. These two concepts exist in a kind of chicken-and-egg relationship: either balance is the heart of parallelism or parallelism is the heart of balance. It is easy to specify what makes a formally balanced sentence: A balanced sentence hinges in the middle, usually split by a semicolon, the second half of the sentence paralleling the first half, but changing one or two key words or altering word order. Dickens's first sentence in A Tale of Two Cities doesn't exactly fit the bill for a formally balanced sentence, but each of its seven initial paired clauses could, reminding us that sometimes a comma does the work of a semicolon in these constructions. But, while this sentence strings together a sequence of parallel balances, there are so many of them that we become more focused on the sentence's parallels than on each of its binary oppositions. Don’t forget to subscribe to our channel – we are adding new videos all the time! https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=TheGreatCourses
Views: 75865 The Great Courses Plus
Sentence Structure analysis 2
 
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Sentence Structure analysis 2
Views: 13 Juan R
Advanced English Grammar: Participles
 
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Using participles correctly will dramatically improve the quality of your English writing. If you're learning English for university, IELTS, TOEFL, or for your career, this advanced writing lesson is for you! You will learn to analyze sentences so that you can understand them fully and write your own. Often, English learners are unsure of whether an "-ing" word is an adjective or an adverb. In this lesson, you'll learn how the participle "having" includes the subject, verb, and conjunction. I'll show you many example sentences, and you can practice what you've learned on our quiz at https://www.engvid.com/advanced-english-grammar-participles/ TRANSCRIPT Hi. Welcome to www.engvid.com. I'm Adam. In today's video we're going to look at participles. Now, this is a little bit more advanced grammar, but it's very useful and it's used in everyday speaking, but especially for writing and reading because you're going to see participles everywhere. What participles do is they help you get sentence variety, they help you make your sentences shorter, if necessary, they give you a little bit of style. Okay? There are two participles that we need to look at, they are called the active or passive participle. Sometimes you'll see them as present or past participle. Past participles, you're familiar with. Sometimes they're called the verb three, so: "eat", past tense "ate", past participle is "eaten". Right? So that's the participle. Now, especially with the "ing" you have to be careful because "ing" words, although they are verbs with "ing", they can be pretty much anything. They could be a gerund, as you know, so they're nouns; they could be part of the continuous verb, so "be going", so: "I am going", it's a continuous action; but "ing" words can also be adjectives and adverbs. When they are adjectives and adverbs they are actually participles. So it's very important to recognize them and know how to use them. So what I want to do first is I want to look at the adjective participles. Now, what you have to remember about adjective participles, they are... They are reduced adjective clauses. You know an adjective clause, it's meant to modify a noun. It identifies it or gives extra information about a noun. A participle, an adjective participle is that adjective clause minus the subject and the verb. Okay? But we're going to look at that in a second. So let's look at this sentence first. Oh, sorry, let me... I made a little mistake here. "Dressed in his class-A uniform, the marine looked like a recruitment poster." So this is the passive or the past participle ending in "ed", it's a regular verb, so: "dressed". "Dressed in his class-A uniform". Now, if I rearrange the sentence, really, it says: "The marine, who was dressed in his class-A uniform, looked like a recruitment poster." Okay? Like a poster that wants people to join the marines, etc. But I can take that adjective clause, I get rid of the "who was" or "who is", depending on the tense. Get rid of that, and I'm left with a participle phrase. Now, I can take that participle phrase and move it to the beginning of the sentence, just like I have here. The key when you're using participles at the beginning... A participle phrase at the beginning of a sentence, you must make sure that the subject, which is not there but it is understood: who was, who is the marine, so the marine who was dressed in his class-A, and then the subject of the independent clause must be the same subject. Okay? We're going to look at a couple more examples. "Standing near the window, Marie could see the entire village." Look at the other example: "Standing near the window, the entire village was in view." Now, many people will look at both sentences and think: "Yeah, okay, I understand them. They're both correct." This sentence is incorrect. Why? Because the subject here is "the village". Can the village stand near the window? No, it can't. So: "Standing near the window" means Marie. "Marie, who was standing near the window, could see the entire village." This subject cannot do this action, so you have to make sure that the implied or the understood subject in the participle is the exact same as the subject of the independent clause that follows it. Okay? That's very, very important. So now what we're going to do, I'm going to look at a few more examples and I want to show you that you can start the sentence with a participle phrase, but you can also leave it in the middle of the sentence. Okay? Let's look at that. Okay, let's look at these examples now and you'll see the different positions the participles can take. And again, we're talking about participle phrases for the most part. "The jazz musician, known for his tendency to daydream, got into a zone and played for an hour straight." Okay? So what we're doing here, we're giving you a little bit more information about the musician. We're not identifying him. We're giving you extra information, which is why we have the commas.
Structure and Arrangement in Electronic Music: Structure Analysis (House Structure)
 
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In this video we take a look at a few different house tracks and analyse their structure. Taught by Sam Matla: http://twitter.com/sammatla Want to get production inspiration and advice every day of the week? Like our page on Facebook and follow us on Twitter: https://www.facebook.com/freshlysqueezedsamples http://twitter.com/freshsamples
Eminem Proves There Are Plenty Of Words That Rhyme With 'Orange'
 
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According to the Oxford English Dictionary,, the only word that perfectly rhymes with “orange” is “sporange,” an uncommon botanical term for a part of a fern. Read more on Genius: https://genius.com/a/eminem-proves-there-are-plenty-of-words-that-rhyme-with-orange Subscribe to Genius: http://bit.ly/2cNV6nz Genius on Twitter: https://twitter.com/Genius Genius on Instagram: http://instagram.com/genius Genius on Facebook: https://facebook.com/Geniusdotcom http://genius.com
Views: 15943240 Genius
Analysis of structure in 'When the Wasps Drowned'
 
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Buy my revision guides in paperback on Amazon: Mr Bruff’s Guide to GCSE English Language https://amzn.to/2GvPrTV Mr Bruff’s Guide to GCSE English Literature https://amzn.to/2POt3V7 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Macbeth’ https://amzn.to/2GxYO5p Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘An Inspector Calls’ https://amzn.to/2GxXJKT Power and Conflict poetry guide (ebook) https://bit.ly/2PS8bw6 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Romeo and Juliet’ https://amzn.to/2GvL0s5 Mr Bruff’s Guide to Grammar: https://amzn.to/2GJCBSj Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Jekyll and Hyde’: https://amzn.to/2SYOFQA Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Sign of Four’: https://amzn.to/2Sbs1EN Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Much Ado About Nothing’: https://amzn.to/2T6s98L Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Great Expectations’: https://amzn.to/2S6OuCY Mr Bruff’s Guide to A’ Level English Literature: https://amzn.to/2T23cef Mr Bruff’s Guide to A’ Level English Language (ebook): https://bit.ly/2LwTuhO Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Animal Farm’: https://amzn.to/2GshZh0 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Tempest’ https://amzn.to/2ScmQ7t Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Othello’: https://amzn.to/2QH9fbK Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time: https://amzn.to/2ScMzfY Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Great Gatsby’ https://amzn.to/2QEHEaU Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Frankenstein’ https://amzn.to/2Gsj7Bg Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Jane Eyre’ https://amzn.to/2Sah46d Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The History Boys’ https://amzn.to/2RaSIvX Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Spies’ https://amzn.to/2R9f4ho Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Pride and Prejudice’ (ebook) https://bit.ly/2A9SWdc More info on sponsors Tuitionkit: https://youtu.be/7ecjBwV6Ydg
Views: 10119 mrbruff
8 English Sentences: Find the Mistakes
 
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Can you find the mistakes in these English sentences? In today's lesson, you'll review 8 grammar rules of correct English sentences. You'll get to practice correcting sentences with me in the video. Once you learn these easy grammar rules, you'll avoid making common mistakes and improve your marks on English essays and exams like IELTS, TOEFL, and TOEIC. To test if you really understand these rules, take the quiz. Good luck with your English! http://www.engvid.com/8-english-sentences-find-the-mistakes/ TRANSCRIPT Hi, my name's Rebecca. For the next few minutes, let's pretend you are the English teacher and you're correcting your student's homework. Let's look at some of these sentences and see if you can find some of the errors in these English sentences. Okay, the first sentence: "My mother she works in a bank." Is that okay? Well, let me tell you right now that actually none of these sentences are okay; there is a mistake in every sentence. So see if you can find the mistake. Okay? "My mother she works in a bank." What's the mistake? Okay... Here, "she", all right? I'm just going to grab a different marker. So what happened here is we said: "My mother she works in a bank." So we cannot repeat the subject. The mistake here is that we had a double subject; the subject was mentioned twice. In English, you can't do that. You just mention the subject once. So this sentence, in order to be correct, would need to be: "My mother works in a bank." Or: "She works in a bank." If you know who "she" is. Right? But you can't say both. So no double subjects. Number two: "John is an engineer" What's wrong with that? Look carefully. Well, what's wrong is that it's missing the punctuation. All right? Part of a correct sentence is correct punctuation. So here, there was no period at the end of the sentence, that's what was wrong. Next sentence: "The manager of my department" What's wrong with that? Well, what's wrong is that it's not a sentence because it doesn't have any verb, there's no verb there. Okay? And, of course, you need to continue this sentence, and then eventually you'd need to have some punctuation as well. But basically, there is no... This is a sentence fragment. This is called only a part of a sentence. It is not a complete English sentence or a correct English sentence. There is no verb. Missing verb. Next one: "we enjoy watching old movies." Okay? Again, look carefully. What's wrong there? Well, it has a subject, it has a verb, but this is the problem. The first letter in the first word of an English sentence has to be capitalized and that's what was missing here. You see, we didn't have that problem before. Okay. Next one: "I like very much Chinese food." Okay? Maybe that sounds okay to you, but doesn't sound okay to me. It's close, but not quite. What's wrong? Well, what's wrong here is this, the word order. Not only do you need to have certain elements, you need to have the words in the right order. So in English, the correct order for this sentence would be: "I like Chinese food very much." Okay? Not: "very much Chinese food." "I like Chinese food very much." Okay? Next: "Maria need help with her hw." "Maria need help with her homework." What's wrong there? Okay? So the mistake is here, the mistake is in subject-verb agreement. The verb has to agree with the subject. Right? And if we say: "Maria", it's like: "she", and we would have to say: "She needs". "Maria needs help with her hw." So the error here was in subject-verb agreement. Next one: "delivered the package yesterday" Okay? "delivered the package yesterday" What's wrong here? Well, it's similar to this one, except here, we had a sentence fragment and we had the subject. Here, we have a sentence fragment, and we have a verb, but we don't have a subject. We have a missing subject. So this is also a sentence fragment. "Fragment" means only part. It is not a complete sentence. Next one: "We recieved your letter." "We recieved your letter." Sounds fine, but if you're an English teacher, you're going to look really carefully at each of the words. And what's wrong is here, the mistake is here. It's a spelling mistake. Okay? The word "received" is one of those tricky words with the "e" and the "i", and the "i" and the "e" that you have to learn very well. So spelling mistakes will also bring down your marks. If you're doing the IELTS, if you're bring... Doing the TOEFL, any errors of this kind will bring your marks down. Okay? So even though they seem very basic, I know from experience that students make all of these mistakes. Be very careful not to make them. Let's look at what principles apply to correct English sentences. Okay? So, an English sentence must express a complete thought and it must express it with certain elements. Now, just because a sentence must express a complete thought, it doesn't have to have a lot of words; it doesn't have to be a very long sentence.
How to Write an Effective Essay: The Introduction
 
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http://www.engvid.com Learn the method for writing the perfect essay introduction. A good introduction makes writing an essay easy and reading it fun. AND YOU'LL GET A BETTER GRADE, TOO! Afterwards, test yourself with the quiz at http://www.engvid.com/effective-essay-introduction/#quiz.
What makes a poem … a poem? - Melissa Kovacs
 
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View full lesson: http://ed.ted.com/lessons/what-makes-a-poem-a-poem-melissa-kovacs What exactly makes a poem … a poem? Poets themselves have struggled with this question, often using metaphors to approximate a definition. Is a poem a little machine? A firework? An echo? A dream? Melissa Kovacs shares three recognizable characteristics of most poetry. Lesson by Melissa Kovacs, animation by Ace & Son Moving Picture Co., LLC.
Views: 577878 TED-Ed
How to Write a Critique Essay (An Evaluation Essay_
 
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Defines the five common parts of a critique essay and provides a formula for completing each part.
Views: 302021 David Taylor
Jane Eyre: Structure Analysis Part 2
 
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Buy my revision guides in paperback on Amazon: Mr Bruff’s Guide to GCSE English Language https://amzn.to/2GvPrTV Mr Bruff’s Guide to GCSE English Literature https://amzn.to/2POt3V7 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Macbeth’ https://amzn.to/2GxYO5p Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘An Inspector Calls’ https://amzn.to/2GxXJKT Power and Conflict poetry guide (ebook) https://bit.ly/2PS8bw6 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Romeo and Juliet’ https://amzn.to/2GvL0s5 Mr Bruff’s Guide to Grammar: https://amzn.to/2GJCBSj Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Jekyll and Hyde’: https://amzn.to/2SYOFQA Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Sign of Four’: https://amzn.to/2Sbs1EN Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Much Ado About Nothing’: https://amzn.to/2T6s98L Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Great Expectations’: https://amzn.to/2S6OuCY Mr Bruff’s Guide to A’ Level English Literature: https://amzn.to/2T23cef Mr Bruff’s Guide to A’ Level English Language (ebook): https://bit.ly/2LwTuhO Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Animal Farm’: https://amzn.to/2GshZh0 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Tempest’ https://amzn.to/2ScmQ7t Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Othello’: https://amzn.to/2QH9fbK Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time: https://amzn.to/2ScMzfY Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Great Gatsby’ https://amzn.to/2QEHEaU Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Frankenstein’ https://amzn.to/2Gsj7Bg Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Jane Eyre’ https://amzn.to/2Sah46d Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The History Boys’ https://amzn.to/2RaSIvX Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Spies’ https://amzn.to/2R9f4ho Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Pride and Prejudice’ (ebook) https://bit.ly/2A9SWdc More info on sponsors Tuitionkit: https://youtu.be/7ecjBwV6Ydg
Views: 3644 mrbruff
What Is Morphology In Language?
 
00:45
"What Is Morphology In Language? Watch more videos for more knowledge Morphology Lesson 1 - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/KmnzJv0kQ7I What is Morphology? | Definition of Morphology ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/RrkcR_9pxjA What is Morphology? - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/_f8GgHxYWsA What Is Morphology In Language? - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/vknkl22kA9c What Is Morphology In Language? - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/uFoYzb9H_zc An Introduction to Morphology - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/syjbhT45J14 What is Morphology in Linguistics ? - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/b-1PT4ZwwsM Grammar of Words: Morphemes & Allomorphs ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/4dSPjg6jmvM What is MORPHOLOGY? What does MORPHOLOGY ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/re2qD-UfSr8 Intro to Morphology - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/yLCfHqeRj1M Morphology I (Inflection): Linguistics - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/FQ6IwufZjt4 Basic Concepts in Morphology (ENG) - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/etSoHg2dHv4 Morphology 101: Word-formation processes - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/pHGtn563DQI LEARN RUSSIAN VERBS & MORPHOLOGY ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/l6ew1mlLjk8 Morphology Word Formation - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/ZT-kkKctmDs Morphology Meaning - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/pJ0ALFAiCj0 MOR101 - The Analysis of Words - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/Stx1YsgfBhw Morphology - YouTube https://www.youtube.com/watch/oOAYzNAUL9U What is MORPHOLOGICAL FREEDOM? What does ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/WY8atklUlyg Morphological Structures of English Words (ENG ... https://www.youtube.com/watch/F82vNtNjcsA"
Views: 289 Thaal Thaal
DNA Structure and Replication: Crash Course Biology #10
 
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Hank introduces us to that wondrous molecule deoxyribonucleic acid - also known as DNA - and explains how it replicates itself in our cells. Crash Course Biology is now available on DVD! http://dftba.com/product/1av/CrashCourse-Biology-The-Complete-Series-DVD-Set Like CrashCourse on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Follow CrashCourse on Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse References for this episode can be found in the Google document here: http://dft.ba/-2hCl 1:41 link to Biological Molecules http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=H8WJ2KENlK0 Table of Contents: 1) Nucleic Acids 1:30 2) DNA -A) Polymers 1:53 -B) Three Ingredients 2:12 -C) Base Pairs 3:45 -D) Base Sequences 4:13 3) Pop Quiz 5:07 4) RNA 5:36 -A) Three Differences from DNA 5:43 5) Biolography 6:16 6) Replication 8:49 -A) Helicase and Unzipping 9:22 -B) Leading Strand 9:38 -C) DNA Polymerase 10:08 -D) RNA Primase 10:24 -E) Lagging Strand 10:46 -F) Okazaki Fragments 11:07 -F) DNA Ligase 11:47 DNA, deoxyribonucleic acid, chromosome, nucleic acid, ribonucleic acid, RNA, polymer, nucleotide, double helix, nucleotide base, base pair, base sequence, friedrich miescher, rosalind franklin, replication, helicase, leading strand, lagging strand, rna primase, dna polymerase, okazaki fragment Support CrashCourse on Subbable: http://subbable.com/crashcourse
Views: 5855004 CrashCourse
Lecture -1 Structural Analysis
 
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Lecture Series on Structural Analysis II by Prof. P. Banerjee, Department of Civil Engineering, IIT Bombay For more Courses visit http://nptel.ac.in
Views: 673045 nptelhrd
Jabberwocky Poem Analysis | Summary, Theme & Structure of Jabberwocky Poem
 
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Jabberwocky Poem Analysis | Summary, Theme & Structure of Jabberwocky Poem: "Jabberwocky" is a nonsense poem written by Lewis Carroll about the killing of a creature named "the Jabberwock". It was included in his 1871 novel Through the Looking-Glass, and What Alice Found There, the sequel to Alice's Adventures in Wonderland. The book tells of Alice's adventures within the back-to-front world of Looking-Glass Land. In an early scene in which she first encounters the chess piece characters White King and White Queen, Alice finds a book written in a seemingly unintelligible language. Realising that she is travelling through an inverted world, she recognises that the verses on the pages are written in mirror-writing. She holds a mirror to one of the poems, and reads the reflected verse of "Jabberwocky". She finds the nonsense verse as puzzling as the odd land she has passed into, later revealed as a dreamscape. "Jabberwocky" is considered one of the greatest nonsense poems written in English. Its playful, whimsical language has given English nonsense words and neologisms such as "galumphing" and "chortle". ...................................................................................... Sources: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jabberwocky Background Music: Evgeny Teilor, https://www.jamendo.com/track/1176656/oceans The Lounge: http://www.bensound.com/royalty-free-music/jazz Images: www.pixabay.com www.openclipart.com ............................................... Jabberwocky poem analysis Jabberwocky poem theme Jabberwocky structure Jabberwocky poem summary
Views: 4261 Free Audio Books
8:30 PM - RAS Mains 2018 | English by Harsh Sir | One Word Substitution
 
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We’re Hiring - https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSdeeJ1lZBGwe6W0oriy4b9sRxKMmZAUEYUTQ8KtKfyO2UinqQ/viewform UPSC Faculty Hiring, Apply Here - https://docs.google.com/forms/d/e/1FAIpQLSd0axbdj30HZzn2Wg-MwRtrV1jLb9m1GcLtMG0uh0gom_CNUg/viewform wifistudy is a part of the Unacademy Group. Follow us on Unacademy: https://unacademy.com/user/wifistudy Subscribe wifistudy vlogs here: https://www.youtube.com/wifistudyvlogs === Live Classes Schedule (Mon-Fri) from 2nd Jan === Morning Shows: 5:00 AM - Current Affairs Quiz Show by Bhunesh Sir 8:00 AM - Current Affairs Show by Bhunesh Sir 8:45 AM - Vocabulary Show by Bhunesh Sir RRB ALP CBT-2 (Part-B) Crash Course: 6:00 AM - Mechanic Diesel by Ramveer Sir 7:00 AM - Fitter by Ramveer Sir अब SSC Steno दूर नहीं: 9:00 AM - English by Sanjeev Sir RRB ALP CBT-2 (Part-A) Crash Course: 9:00 AM - Basic Science and Engineering by Neeraj Sir 10:00 AM - Current Affairs by Bhunesh Sir 10:15 AM - Reasoning by Hitesh Sir 11:00 AM - Maths by Sahil Sir RPF (SI & Constable) Crash Course: 12:00 PM - Reasoning by Deepak Sir 1:00 PM - General Awareness by Shipra Ma'am 2:00 PM - Maths by Sahil Sir UPSC CDS (I) 2019: 3:00 PM - English by Harsh Sir 4:00 PM - GK by Sandeep Sir अब Patwar दूर नहीं: 3:00 PM - Maths by Sahil Sir 3:30 PM - History by Praveen Sir 4:00 PM - Hindi by Ganesh Sir 4:30 PM - Geography by Rajendra Sir अब CGL/CPO/IB दूर नहीं: 5:00 PM - English by Harsh Sir 5:30 PM - Reasoning by Deepak Sir 6:00 PM - GK by Shipra Ma'am 6:30 PM - Maths by Naman Sir अबकी बार English पार: 7:00 PM - English for All Competitive Exams by Sanjeev Sir RAS Mains 2018: 7:00 PM - History by Praveen Sir 8:00 PM - Hindi by Ganesh Sir 8:30 PM - English by Harsh Sir 9:00 PM - Ethics by Pushpa Ma'am अब SSC GD दूर नहीं: 8:00 PM - Reasoning by Deepak Sir 8:30 PM - Hindi by Ganesh Sir 9:00 PM - GK by Sandeep Sir 9:30 PM - Maths by Naman Sir (Mon-Wed) 9:30 PM - English by Sanjeev Sir (Thu-Fri) UP Police Constable Crash Course: 10:00 PM - Reasoning by Hitesh Sir 10:30 PM - Maths by Naman Sir 11:15 PM - GK by Sandeep Sir 12:00 AM - Hindi by Ganesh Sir Technical Classes (SSC JE/GATE) Sat / Sun: 12:00 PM - Mech by Vishal Sir 7:00 PM - EE/EC by Ashish Sir Download wifistudy App: https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.wifistudy.onlinetest&hl=en_IN
Views: 6592 wifistudy
Improve Your Writing - 6 ways to compare
 
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One of the most common types of essays you will have to write at university as well as on the IELTS or TOEFL is a comparison essay. In this lesson, I will teach you some useful words that will help you to compare things. By the end of this video, you will be able to use terms such as "alike", "similar", "in the same way", "likewise", and more. Take my quiz at the end for more experience using these words. http://www.engvid.com/writing-6-ways-to-compare/ TRANSCRIPT Hello. My name is Emma, and in today's video, I am going to teach you some key words you can use when you talk about how things are the same or similar. Okay? So when you compare two things -- when you're comparing apples and oranges, there are some similarities. They're both fruits. When you're comparing shopping to skiing, when you're comparing a city to a country or the countryside -- there is a certain language we like to use when we're saying how these things are similar or the same. In this video, I'm going to teach you a bunch of expressions you can use when comparing two things to show their similarities. Okay? So this video is called "Talking about similarities". So for this video, I decided I wanted to do a theme. I wanted to look at how Canada and England are similar. In what ways are they very much alike? Okay? So each of my sentences are going to have to do with Canada and England, and we're going to look at how they're alike using these comparison words. So for those of you watching, if you are doing the TOEFL, these words are essential. If you are doing the IELTS -- very important vocabulary here. General English, you can use these at university for essays, college, or even just general conversation. So let's get started. Okay. So how are Canada and England the same? Well, I would say, first of all, both Canada and England have a queen. Both Canada and England have Queen Elizabeth. So one word we often use when we're talking about similarities is this word, "both". Both Canada and England have a queen. Both Canada and England have trees. Both Canada and England have cities. Okay? So there are a lot of different things you can compare. This is just one of them. Now, I want to say why I wrote the word "beginning" here. "Both" often comes at the beginning of a sentence. And notice how the construction is. We have both A and B. Another example, "Both cats and dogs are animals." "Both hamsters and mice are rodents." Okay? So we use this a lot when we're comparing. We can also say "like". In this case, we're not saying, "I like Canada" or "I like" -- you know, showing preference -- we're again showing similarity. "Like Canada, England has many immigrants." Canada has many immigrants. England has many immigrants. "Like Canada, England has many immigrants." And again, you'll notice "like" is at the beginning of the sentence. It's often -- not always, but often -- at the beginning. We have it followed by a noun. I could change this to something else. Imagine if I wanted to compare cats and dogs. "Like cats, dogs have fur." Okay? I could say that. If I'm comparing men and women, "Like women, men are human." Okay? It's not the greatest of comparisons, but you can use these types of words when you're comparing. Okay? So now, I have some other things I want to compare. In England, they speak English. In Canada, we also speak English. Not everybody, but many Canadians speak English. Some speak French, but a lot of people speak English. So I'm going to teach you some words you can use when comparing these two sentences. "In England, they speak English. Similarly, in Canada many people speak English, too. In comparison, in Canada many people also speak English. In the same way, in Canada many people speak English." And finally, another way similar to this but slightly different, "Likewise, in Canada many people speak English." So these are a little bit different from these ones. They all mean how they are the same. But you'll notice one of the differences here is these are followed by a comma. "Likewise, comma." And then, we have the rest of the sentence. These go at the beginning of the sentence. Okay? In case you can't tell, this is a period. So we have our first sentence, "In England, they speak English. Similarly, in Canada many people speak English." Okay? So you can use these in your writing. They would really, really help on your TOEFL, IELTS, or university essays to help you get a better mark.
What is a HashTable Data Structure - Introduction to Hash Tables , Part 0
 
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This tutorial is an introduction to hash tables. A hash table is a data structure that is used to implement an associative array. This video explains some of the basic concepts regarding hash tables, and also discusses one method (chaining) that can be used to avoid collisions. Wan't to learn C++? I highly recommend this book http://amzn.to/1PftaSt Donate http://bit.ly/17vCDFx
Views: 761183 Paul Programming
Linguistic Video Scribes - Constituent Analysis: The AdvP
 
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This video scribe where Prof. Handke briefly outlines the structure of the Adverb Phrase is supplementary to the e-lecture "More on Constituents I" where the central principles of X-bar Syntax are discussed and exemplified.
MLA Style Essay Format - Word Tutorial
 
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MLA style essay formatting: margins, font, line spacing, header, info block, title, indentation, block quote, Works Cited. For a transcript of this video, please see http://polaris.umuc.edu/ewc/web/mla7.html
Views: 1424252 David Taylor
How Louis CK Tells A Joke
 
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Get one month free at The Great Courses Plus here: http://ow.ly/OTFe307WTs8 THE NERDWRITER T-SHIRT: https://store.dftba.com/products/the-nerdwriter-shirt ASK ME QUESTIONS HERE: http://thenerdwriter.tumblr.com TWITTER: https://twitter.com/TheeNerdwriter Email me here: [email protected] MUSIC: Joey Pecoraro: https://soundcloud.com/joeypecoraro/tired-boy https://soundcloud.com/joeypecoraro/warm MY RULES FOR SPONSORSHIPS: 1) Sponsor cannot choose video topic. 2) Sponsor cannot give notes or ask for changes. 3) Sponsor cannot see video before it airs. 4) Sponsorship will not be integrated into the video proper in any way, but only appear on the end-screen after a few seconds of black. 5) I have to be sympathetic with the brand/client.
Views: 2766197 Nerdwriter1
How to format a Word doc for writing an APA style college paper
 
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See the updated 'How to format a Word doc for writing an APA style college paper' playlist here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL0xGuKGeqjBgNxZPWttCjX2UJrYIh5lew Step-by-step instructions on how to format your Word document correctly for your college writing assignments using APA style. Includes: margins, font styles, double spacing paragraphs, page headers, table of contents, references, and hanging indents
Views: 1096093 Jennifer McCord
50 MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English Grammar - Error Identification & Correction
 
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Find out if you make the 50 MOST COMMON MISTAKES in English, and learn how to avoid them. See all GRAMMAR LESSONS here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. ***** ALSO CHECK OUT ***** 1. PARTS OF SPEECH LESSONS: https://goo.gl/ouZgqu 2. TENSES LESSONS: https://goo.gl/7t5Hkg 3. MODAL VERBS LESSONS: https://goo.gl/v9fCh8 4. CONDITIONALS LESSONS: https://goo.gl/prd7ex 5. ARTICLES LESSONS: https://goo.gl/3xdcJP
Views: 631118 Learn English Lab
Burj Khalifa, Construction Hindi
 
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The Burj Khalifa known as the Burj Dubai before its inauguration, is a mega tall skyscraper in Dubai, United Arab Emirates. It is the tallest structure in the world, standing at 829.8 m (2,722 ft). Construction of the Burj Khalifa began in 2004, with the exterior completed 5 years later in 2009. The primary structure is reinforced concrete. The building was opened in 2010 as part of a new development called Downtown Dubai. It is designed to be the centrepiece of large-scale, mixed-use development. The decision to build the building is reportedly based on the government's decision to diversify from an oil-based economy, and for Dubai to gain international recognition. The building was named in honour of the ruler of Abu Dhabi and president of the United Arab Emirates, Khalifa bin Zayed Al Nahyan; Abu Dhabi and the UAE government lent Dubai money to pay its debts. The building broke numerous height records, including its designation as the tallest tower in the world.
Views: 3686218 Avant Grade
Analysis of 'Laundrette' by Liz Lochhead
 
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Analysis of 'laundrette' by Mr Gibb. Please remember to be identifying, analysing and commenting on the effectiveness of poetic techniques, structure, word choices, caesura, enjambment etc in this poem as well. CIE IGCSE.
Views: 7737 mrgibbenglish
Rapping, deconstructed: The best rhymers of all time
 
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Here's how some of the greatest rappers make rhymes Special thanks to the research of Martin Connor who was interviewed in this piece. More of his rap analysis can be found here: http://www.rapanalysis.com/ SPOTIFY PLAYLIST: https://open.spotify.com/user/estellecaswell/playlist/5KpHR1UysAms2zssDHeSbZ Subscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjO Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com to get up to speed on everything from Kurdistan to the Kim Kardashian app. Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyE Follow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5H Or on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
Views: 7574793 Vox
Shakespeare's Sonnets: Crash Course Literature 304
 
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This week, we're learning about sonnets, and English Literature's best-known purveyor of those fourteen-line paeans, William Shakespeare. We'll look at a few of Willy Shakes's biggest hits, including Sonnet 18, "Shall I compare thee to a summer's day," Sonnet 116, "Let me not to the marriage of true minds admit impediment," and Sonnet 130, "My mistresses's eyes are nothing like the sun." We'll talk about what makes a sonnet, a little bit about their history, and even a little bit about how reading poetry helps us understand how to be human beings.
Views: 449074 CrashCourse
PHRASE vs. CLAUSE - What's the Difference? - English Grammar - Independent and Dependent Clauses
 
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What is the difference between a phrase and a clause? Watch this video and find out. Also see - MOST COMMON MISTAKES IN ENGLISH & HOW TO AVOID THEM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1Dax90QyXgI&list=PLmwr9polMHwsR35rD9spEhjFUFa7QblF9 In this lesson, you will also learn about the different types of phrases and clauses with examples. Topics include dependent and independent clauses, noun phrases, verb phrases, adverb phrases etc. ★★★ Also check out ★★★ ➜ PARTS OF SPEECH (Verb, Noun, Adjective, Adverb etc.): https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsQmAjoAxtFvwk_PaqQeS68 ➜ WHAT'S THE DIFFERENCE Full Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ WILL vs. SHALL: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NwfUXeO3AfU&index=1&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ WHO vs. WHOM: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qX_E_p4tfW0&index=2&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ DO or MAKE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ObRS73F4tok&index=4&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL ➜ SAY, TELL, SPEAK, TALK: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=F90m3SbXQqQ&index=3&list=PLmwr9polMHwsogkc_bK76YwTmSUIumDBL For more FREE English lessons, SUBSCRIBE to this channel. Transcript: Many people are confused about the difference between phrases and clauses. Are these different grammar items or are they just two names for the same thing? That's what we're going to talk about in this video. Now before we start just remember: if you have any questions at all you just have to ask me in the comments section below and I will talk to you there. So in this lesson we're going to learn the difference between phrases and clauses. But first let's talk about how phrases and clauses are similar. They're similar in this way: both of these refer two groups of words that are meaningful. Look at these examples: near my home or Dexter won the bicycle race You can see that these are meaningful so one of them is afraid and the other is a clause OK so what's the difference between them? Well the difference is this: a clause is a group of words with a subject-verb combination so Dexter won the bicycle race is a clause because it has a subject - Dexter and a verb - won is the past tense of win so this is a clause. A phrase is a group of words without a subject-verb combination. So near my home is a phrase because there's no subject verb combination It's very simple but keep this important difference in mind - a clause has a subject-verb combination and a phrase does not. So now let me show you some more examples so that you can learn how to easily identify phrases and clauses Alright all the words that you see on the screen are phrases. You'll notice that in all of these there's no subject verb combination and these examples also show the most common types of phrases For example my two wonderful dogs is a phrase focusing on the noun dogs and the phrase the tallest building in the world focuses on the noun building so we say that these are noun phrases. What about couldn't go and will be working? Can you guess what type of phrases these are? These are verb phrases because they only have verbs in them. All of these words are verbs similarly we have the adjective phrases very friendly and afraid of the dark we say that these are adjective phrases because the focus is on friendly and afraid - the other words in these phrases are only helping the main words and the main words are adjectives. Really fast and much quicker are adverb phrases because the adverbs fast and quicker are the focus of these phrases and finally what about near the post office and on the 29th? Do you know? These are preposition phrases because each of these tells us about a place or about time using the prepositions near and on. These are the most common types of phrases that you will come across and once again remember these are phrases because they don't have a subject verb combination. So let's now look at some examples of clauses like I said a clause is just like a phrase - it's a group of words but a clause has a subject verb combination now in English there are many different kinds of causes but the two most important that you need to know about are independent and dependent clauses let's start with the independent clause this is simply a clause that can stand alone as a sentence. For example He ate dinner this is a clause because it has a subject - he - and a verb - ate - past tense of eat and it's independent because it can be a sentence on its own. So what's a dependent clause then? Well it's a clause that is it has a subject-verb combination but it cannot be a sentence by itself. For example When James got home is a dependent clause - it has a subject - James - and a verb - got - but if you think about it it's not a complete sentence because if I said when James got home you will ask okay then what? What happened? So you see the sentence isn't complete so this is a dependent clause.
Views: 359411 Learn English Lab
New CGI of How Titanic Sank | Titanic 100
 
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Titanic: The Final Word With James Cameron : James Cameron and his team pull together a new CGI of how they believe the TItanic sank and reached the ocean floor. ➡ Subscribe: http://bit.ly/NatGeoSubscribe About National Geographic: National Geographic is the world's premium destination for science, exploration, and adventure. Through their world-class scientists, photographers, journalists, and filmmakers, Nat Geo gets you closer to the stories that matter and past the edge of what's possible. Get More National Geographic: Official Site: http://bit.ly/NatGeoOfficialSite Facebook: http://bit.ly/FBNatGeo Twitter: http://bit.ly/NatGeoTwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/NatGeoInsta New CGI of How Titanic Sank | Titanic 100 https://youtu.be/FSGeskFzE0s National Geographic https://www.youtube.com/natgeo
Views: 24670954 National Geographic
Beta Weights, Structure Coefficients, Commonality Analysis, and All Possible Subsets Regression in R
 
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In this R demonstration, Amanda from the IRA lab walks through the R Syntax provided by Kraha, Turner, Nimon, Zientek, & Henson (2012). This code provides Beta Weights, Structure Coefficients, Commonality Analysis, and All Possible Subsets Regression.
Views: 2015 Amanda Kraha
Introduction to Text Analysis with NVivo 11 for Windows
 
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It’s easy to get lost in a lot of text-based data. NVivo is qualitative data analysis software that provides structure to text, helping you quickly unlock insights and make something beautiful to share. http://www.qsrinternational.com
Views: 123443 NVivo by QSR
'Medusa' by Carol Ann Duffy: Structure / Form Analysis
 
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Buy my revision guides in paperback on Amazon: Mr Bruff’s Guide to GCSE English Language https://amzn.to/2GvPrTV Mr Bruff’s Guide to GCSE English Literature https://amzn.to/2POt3V7 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Macbeth’ https://amzn.to/2GxYO5p Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘An Inspector Calls’ https://amzn.to/2GxXJKT Power and Conflict poetry guide (ebook) https://bit.ly/2PS8bw6 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Romeo and Juliet’ https://amzn.to/2GvL0s5 Mr Bruff’s Guide to Grammar: https://amzn.to/2GJCBSj Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Jekyll and Hyde’: https://amzn.to/2SYOFQA Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Sign of Four’: https://amzn.to/2Sbs1EN Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Much Ado About Nothing’: https://amzn.to/2T6s98L Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Great Expectations’: https://amzn.to/2S6OuCY Mr Bruff’s Guide to A’ Level English Literature: https://amzn.to/2T23cef Mr Bruff’s Guide to A’ Level English Language (ebook): https://bit.ly/2LwTuhO Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Animal Farm’: https://amzn.to/2GshZh0 Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Tempest’ https://amzn.to/2ScmQ7t Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Othello’: https://amzn.to/2QH9fbK Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night Time: https://amzn.to/2ScMzfY Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The Great Gatsby’ https://amzn.to/2QEHEaU Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Frankenstein’ https://amzn.to/2Gsj7Bg Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Jane Eyre’ https://amzn.to/2Sah46d Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘The History Boys’ https://amzn.to/2RaSIvX Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Spies’ https://amzn.to/2R9f4ho Mr Bruff’s Guide to ‘Pride and Prejudice’ (ebook) https://bit.ly/2A9SWdc More info on sponsors Tuitionkit: https://youtu.be/7ecjBwV6Ydg
Views: 5913 mrbruff
APA Format in Word - in 4 Minutes
 
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RECOMMEND USING UPDATED "APA Format in Word - in 4 Minutes V2" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qZVIa2sTbpM Format basic APA documents in Word in 4 minutes. Really. This is a visual approach to writing APA in Word. At the end you'll find the steps used, which you can copy or screen print. Created for my college students, but shared in the hope that it helps others. If you have an earlier version of Word, just look for the same keywords, such as "different first page". Other how-to APA topics, such as citations and references, will appear in subsequent videos.
Views: 909690 Colin Murphy, Ed.D.

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