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TCP: Transmission control protocol | TCP Header | Tranport layer | part -1
 
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Lecture By: Mr. Varun Singla Facebook page link : https://www.facebook.com/gatesmashers/
Views: 19763 Gate Smashers
TCP header
 
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Transmission Control Protocol accepts data from a data stream, divides it into chunks, and adds a TCP header creating a TCP segment. The TCP segment is then encapsulated into an Internet Protocol (IP) datagram, and exchanged with peers. Lets Learn more about TCP header format and how TCP is reliable.
Views: 16944 Networking Stop
CCIE R&S: Understanding Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) : Introduction to TCP
 
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CCIE R&S: Understanding Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) : Introduction to TCP At first glance, the Transmission Control Protocol might seem fairly easy. Data gets transmitted, and then an acknowledgment is returned. But as one takes the time to research this protocol, it quickly becomes quite more complex than previously assumed. This course will go deep into the functioning of TCP at a level that you will be hard-pressed to find anywhere else. You will not only learn details about how TCP develops it system of sequencing segments and providing acknowledgments, but you’ll also learn the nitty-gritty details of things like the Sliding Window, the MSS, the Receive Window, and the TCP “Urgent” and “Push” functions. You’ll learn the differences between TCP “Passive” and “Active” Opens, and how these affect the creation of TCBs. You’ll learn about Nagle’s Algorithm, the “TCP_NoDelay” option, and how both of these affect how-and-when TCP segments are created. In addition, this course also goes into details about TCP’s congestion avoidance mechanisms of Slow Start, the Congestion Avoidance Algorithm, Fast Retransmit, and TCP Fast Recovery, and much, much more. If you would like to view the entire course, visit www.ine.com to sign up for an All Access Pass! https://streaming.ine.com/c/ccie-rs-understaning-tcp
Views: 17237 INEtraining
TCP Header: Networking & TCP/IP Tutorial. TCP/IP Explained
 
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TCP Header: Networking & TCP/IP Tutorial. TCP/IP Explained Today we examine the TCP header in great detail let’s look at the location of TCP in the TCP/IP stack resides in the transport layer which is layer 4 note the transport layer contains UDP and TCP you going to either use TCP or UDP but not both. TCP is much more complex because it’s connection oriented Let’s examine the fields in detail source port destination port sequence number acknowledgment number HLEN Reserved URG ACK PSH RST SYN FIN window size checksum urgent pointer options+ padding
Views: 32330 Packethacks.com
What is TCP/IP?
 
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Many of us have seen mysterious "TCP/IP options" in our network settings, but what is TCP/IP, and how does it enable the Internet to operate as it does? TunnelBear message: TunnelBear is the easy-to-use VPN app for mobile and desktop. Visit http://tunnelbear.com/linus to try it free and save 10% when you sign up for unlimited TunnelBear data. Follow: http://twitter.com/linustech Join the community: http://linustechtips.com
Views: 667473 Techquickie
Windows XP - Bacis TCP/IP Settings
 
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Learn how to edit basic TCP/IP settings in WIndows XP. Read more: http://www.utilizewindows.com/xp-menu/networking/229-tcp-ip-settings-in-xp
Views: 233547 Utilize Windows
How TCP Works -  No Operation Option
 
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In this video we will take a look at the No Operation option in the TCP Handshake. This field acts as a filler to pad out the header size to a multiple of 4 bytes. Let's see why that is important. Subscribe for more tips and tricks using Wireshark! Got network problems or want some training? Let's get in touch www.packetpioneer.com/contact
Views: 2220 Chris Greer
How TCP Works - The Timestamps Option
 
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In the TCP header, you may see a scary-looking 4 byte number in the Timestamp option. What is this thing and how TCP use it? Let's dig. You can follow along with the video on this trace file --- bit.ly/TCPTimeStamps Got questions? Let's get in touch! www.packetpioneer.com/contact Chris Greer is an independent network analyst, specializing in protocol analysis with Wireshark. He offers training and consulting services to enable network engineers to harness and better understand the power of the packet.
Views: 586 Chris Greer
Wireshark 101: Transmission Control Protocol, HakTip 126
 
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This week on HakTip, Shannon Morse explains the Transmission Control Protocol (or TCP) within Wireshark. Today we are breaking down the Transmission Control Protocol or TCP for short, which runs in Layer 4 of the OSI model and runs on top of IP. TCP basically makes sure your data gets to where it's supposed to go in a reliable way. Consider that IP is the pizza, and TCP is the pizza delivery guy (or girl), she ensures your pizza gets to you on time. Let's check out a TCP Header Packet. The first part will be the Source Port, used to transmit the packet, then you have the Destination Port which is the port to where the packet will be transmitted. Next up is the Sequence Number. This ensures that part of the data stream isn't missing from the whole packet. It identifies the TCP segment. The Acknowledgment Number is the sequence # for the next packet. Flags can include URG, ACH, PSH, RST, SYN, and FIN for type of TCP packet. Window Size is the size of the TCP receiver buffer in bytes. Checksum ensures the contacts are intact and legit. Urgent Pointer is if the URG flag is there, this part will give extra instructions about where the CPU should begin reading data in the packet. And options are extra info. Let's take a look at a TCP Packet header so we can point these out. TCP works by transmitting data on ports, which range between 1-65,535. Ports 1-1023 are Standard Ports (like Port 80 for HTTP falls within this category), and ports 1024-65535 are ephemeral ports, which are randomly selected when a device needs to find an open port. Both the destination and the client need to know what port the other is listening on to be able to transmit data between them. Oftentimes, a source port will be chosen at random when TCP sends a packet. TCP packets start with a handshake that ensures the host and destination are up and ready to communicate, checks the open port, and sends a sequence number so data stays in line. The host will send a SYN packet to the destination, the destination will send a SYN/ACK packet, then the Host will send an ACK packet back. During this handshake, the Sequence Number will go up by one each time. The TCP Teardown is the last thing that happens between the two devices before their communication is over, and it's signified by a FIN flag. The host sends the destination a FIN/ACK packet, then the destination sends the host an ACK packet, then a FIN/ACK, and the host responds with an ACK. Let's see if we can find a teardown packet header. Lastly, sometimes a TCP packet will need to send something called a RESET, or RST as it would be called in the Flag section. If a connection is halted all of a sudden by accident, the TCP packet will try to reset with this flag. This will halt all traffic during the sequence and close out the packet. Let me know what you think. Send me a comment below or email us at [email protected] And be sure to check out our sister show, Hak5 for more great stuff just like this. I'll be there, reminding you to trust your technolust. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Bash Bunny Primer - Hak5 2225" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8j6hrjSrJaM -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 34823 Hak5
CCIE R&S: Understanding Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) : TCP Push Function
 
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CCIE R&S: Understanding Transmission Control Protocol (TCP) : TCP Push Function At first glance, the Transmission Control Protocol might seem fairly easy. Data gets transmitted, and then an acknowledgment is returned. But as one takes the time to research this protocol, it quickly becomes quite more complex than previously assumed. This course will go deep into the functioning of TCP at a level that you will be hard-pressed to find anywhere else. You will not only learn details about how TCP develops it system of sequencing segments and providing acknowledgments, but you’ll also learn the nitty-gritty details of things like the Sliding Window, the MSS, the Receive Window, and the TCP “Urgent” and “Push” functions. You’ll learn the differences between TCP “Passive” and “Active” Opens, and how these affect the creation of TCBs. You’ll learn about Nagle’s Algorithm, the “TCP_NoDelay” option, and how both of these affect how-and-when TCP segments are created. In addition, this course also goes into details about TCP’s congestion avoidance mechanisms of Slow Start, the Congestion Avoidance Algorithm, Fast Retransmit, and TCP Fast Recovery, and much, much more. If you would like to view the entire course, visit www.ine.com to sign up for an All Access Pass! https://streaming.ine.com/c/ccie-rs-understaning-tcp
Views: 10579 INEtraining
UDP and TCP: Comparison of Transport Protocols
 
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Explains the basics of transport protocols and compares the two major options: UDP and TCP. Here's a list of the sections in this video and their time codes: 00:07 - About transport protocols 02:11 - User Datagram Protocol 04:08 - Transmission Control Protocol 09:00 - So which one is better? == Further reading == How can BitTorrent run reliable file transfers over UDP? - http://arstechnica.com/uncategorized/2008/12/utorrents-switch-to-udp-and-why-the-sky-isnt-falling/ - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Micro_Transport_Protocol == Acknowledgements == The thumbnail of this video uses an icon by Dmitry Baranovskiy from The Noun Project. The icons that are used throughout the video are credited to their respective authors at the end of the video.
Views: 787385 PieterExplainsTech
Windows 7 Manual TCP/IP Configuration
 
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Learn how to manually configure the TCP/IP address within Windows 7.
Views: 293658 brickhouselabs
TCP Connection Management Part 1 | IIT Lecture Series
 
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TCP is a unicast connection-oriented protocol. Before either end can send data to the other, a connection must be established between them. TCP detects and repairs essentially all the data transfer problems that may be introduced by packet loss, duplication, or errors at the IP layer (or below). Because of its management of connection state (information about the connection kept by both endpoints), TCP is a considerably more complicated protocol than UDP. During connection establishment, several options can be exchanged between the two endpoints regarding the parameters of the connection. Some options are allowed to be sent only when the connection is established, and others can be sent later. The TCP header has a limited space for holding options (40 bytes).
Views: 33481 CSE Technical Videos
How TCP Works - The Receive Window
 
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In this video we take a look at the TCP Receive Window. We'll analyze an example of a client's window that goes to zero, halting the transfer of data from a server. In another video, we will take a look at why Zero Windows happen and what we can do about them. Got packet problems? Let's get in touch! www.packetpioneer.com/contact
Views: 8643 Chris Greer
TCP IP vs OSI Model, Port Numbers, TCP Sequencing and TCP Windowing
 
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TCP IP vs OSI Model, Port Numbers, TCP Sequencing and TCP Windowing
Views: 296 Abdel Ghazal
TCP Connection Management Part 2 | IIT Lecture Series
 
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TCP is a unicast connection-oriented protocol. Before either end can send data to the other, a connection must be established between them. TCP detects and repairs essentially all the data transfer problems that may be introduced by packet loss, duplication, or errors at the IP layer (or below). Because of its management of connection state (information about the connection kept by both endpoints), TCP is a considerably more complicated protocol than UDP. During connection establishment, several options can be exchanged between the two endpoints regarding the parameters of the connection. Some options are allowed to be sent only when the connection is established, and others can be sent later. The TCP header has a limited space for holding options (40 bytes).
Views: 13018 CSE Technical Videos
3.11 - TCP Segment Structure
 
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This video describes about TCP Segment Structure. "The unit of transmission in TCP is called segments. The header includes source and destination port numbers, which are used for multiplexing/demultiplexing data from/to upper-layer applications. The 32-bit sequence number field and the 32-bit acknowledgment number field are used by the TCP sender and receiver in implementing a reliable data transfer service. The 4-bit header length field specifies the length of the TCP header in 32-bit words. The TCP header can be of variable length due to the TCP options field. GTU - Computer Engineering (CE) - Semester 4 - 2140709 - Computer Networks - Transport Layer - Pipelined Protocol - TCP Segment Structure Computer Networks PPTs are available here: http://www.darshan.ac.in/DIET/CE/GTU-Computer-Engineering-Study-Material This video is recorded by Prof. Maulik Trivedi ([email protected], +91-9998265805) at Computer Engineering Department of Darshan Institute of Engineering & Technology, Rajkot as per GTU Syllabus. Darshan Institute of Engineering & Technology, Rajkot is a leading institute offering undergraduate, graduate and postgraduate programs in engineering. The Institute is affiliated to the Gujarat Technological University (GTU) and approved by the AICTE, New Delhi. Visit us: http://www.darshan.ac.in Write us: [email protected] Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/DarshanInstitute.Official Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/darshan_inst Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/darshan_inst/"
How TCP Works - Window Scaling and Calculated Window Size
 
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In this video we will learn about how the Window Scale option in TCP works. In the networks of today, TCP has options that allow it to greatly increase the TCP receive buffer on a system. We will also examine how Wireshark uses the scale factor to display the calculated window size value, making analysis of receive windows much easier. Have packet questions? Let's chat! www.packetpioneer.com/contact
Views: 11975 Chris Greer
TCP Flow Control
 
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This video explains the concept of TCP windows and how the flow control is implemented in TCP
Views: 354 Ashish Seth
Internet Protocol - IPv4 vs IPv6 as Fast As Possible
 
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IPv4 vs IPv6... Why do we need to transition from the Internet Protocol that's served us so well for all these years? Maybe because we're completely running out of IP addresses! Audible Message: Give Audible's monthly audiobook service has more than just audiobooks! - use http://audible.com/techquickie to get the first one for free!
Views: 979343 Techquickie
TCP part 2
 
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This is part 2 in the TCP series following chapter 9 in the Packet Guide to Core Network protocols.
Views: 1768 Bruce Hartpence
IP Header: Networking & TCP/IP Tutorial. TCP/IP Explained
 
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IP Header: Networking & TCP/IP Tutorial. TCP/IP Explained TRANSCRIPT: Today we examine the IP Header in great detail. So 1st lets look at the location of IP in the TCP/IP Stack. We notice that its in the Network Layer, which is layer 3. Now let’s examine the fields in detail. Version (4 Bits) Defines the version of the IP Protocol. Currently version you have mostly vers 4, ie IPv4 with Ipv6 coming in. Vers 6 could totally replace 4, probably around the same time porn is totally eliminated from the internet. Header Length (4 bits) This is the total length of the header in 4 byte words (that’s 32 bits for you n00bs). Meaning it points to the beginning of the data.With no options the header length is 20 bytes, so the value of the field is 5 (20 / 4). Add options and guess what: value increases. Service Type (8 bits) This was originally TOS, to indicate the QOS (Quality of Service) desired in networks that offer service precedence. So high precedence traffic got the royal treatment. Just for fun they changed it to Differentiated Services, still concerned precedence, but with a different interpretation. But it’s still compatiblewith the original TOS. Total Length (16 bit) This is the total length of the IP datagram, in bytes including header and the data. Do the math: 16 bits allows for a total length of up to 65,535. Try sending a 65,000 byte datagram over your production network just for fun Identification (16 bits) If the datagram is fragmented, all the fragments will have same unique identification value. This way the receiving end knows that all fragments with same identification value need to be assembled back into one datagram Flags (3 bit) Bit 0: Reserved (for what, nobody knows) Bit 1: Do not Fragment. If set to 1, may not be fragmented. So if MTU is too small, datagram is dropped. Remember MTU = Maximum Transfer Unit Bit 2: More fragments. If set to 1, then the datagram is not the last fragment OK, we just came across 2 important terms, Fragmentation & MTU. Let’s discuss them now before proceeding What’s Fragmentation? LANs & WANs have a limit on the amount of data that can be carried in a frame (at layer 2), which is usually Ethernet. That limit is called the MTU = Maximum Transfer Unit. But the datagram prepared at the network layer, may be larger the MTU, due to the large amount of that needs to be sent. In this case, the datagram needs to be fragmented to smaller unit before being passed to the data link layer. Fragmentation offset (13 bits) Indicates the relative position of each particular frag when a datagram is fragmented. It’s the offset of the original datagram in 8 byte units. Note carefully - 8 byte units. Example - Datagram of 3200 bytes is split into3 frags1st Frag: Carries the 1st 1400 bytes. Being the 1st frag it’s offset is always 0.2nd Frag: Carries the next 1400 bytes. It’s offset is 175. Why? It’s the bytes in theprior frag, divided by 8.Last Frag: Carries the next 800 bytes. It’soffset is 350. Why? It’s the bytes in the prior 2 frags (2800) divided by 8 Time to live (8 Bits) Prevents the datagram from hanging around endlessly, like unwanted guests, should routing tables get screwy. Each router it hits decrements the TTL by 1, & when TTL gets to 0, the datagram is unceremoniously discarded. Use of TTL is what makes Traceroute work Protocol (8 bits) Defines the upper layer Protocol. A value of 6 indicates TCP sits on top of the IP datagram. Value of 17 indicates UDP. 1 indicates ICMP. There’s over a 100 more, some important, most obscure. Header checksum (16 bits) Purpose of checksum is to detect corruption in transit. For IP, the checksum covers the header but not the data. The sender uses analgorithm (one’s complement arithmetic, if you must know) on the header & the result is sent with the packet. Then the receiver uses same algorithm over the header, and comes up with it’s own result result. If the results don’t match the packet is rejected like a geek at senior prom. Source IP Address (32 bits) I thought long & hard about how to describe this one. In a stroke of genius I came upwith “the IP address of the source” It looks like this: 192.168.1.1 Not this: 68-A3-C4-3F-52-53 Destination IP Address (32 bits) This one should be pretty muchself explantory after reading my brilliant explanation on Source IP address Options + Padding (32 bits) Options don’t seem to be used too much solet’s blow it off for now. If your do use em,you add enough padding so that the field is exactly 32 bits.Seems like fertile ground for crafted packethacks This has been Huckleberry. Please mash down that LIKE button right now before you forget.
Views: 11715 Packethacks.com
TCP/IP IPv4 Header Explanation
 
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TCP/IP IPv4 Header Explanation/Understanding for Network Engineer Interview Preparation - By Raman Bishnoi CCIE RS
Views: 7458 baato mein baat
Wireshark 101: TCP Flow Control, HakTip 135
 
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Today on HakTip, Shannon explains window size in packets and how TCP controls flow of data. When sending TCP packets you can run into problems in which the outcome would be retransmissions and duplicates. There is a way to keep packet loss from happening too. This is called a 'sliding window mechanism'. It lets you adjust the rate of data transmission depending on the destinations 'receive window'. The destination has a certain amount of bytes it can hold in it's TCP buffer space, and if the amount of data spills over that buffer space, it results in packet loss. You can view the "Window Size" under the TCP packet header. Each time the amount of bytes accumulates in the Buffer Space, eventually it'll be processed up to the Application layer protocol, and the buffer space will be available again for a new packet of bytes. If a server is receiving data too quickly and it can't process all the bytes fast enough to keep it's buffer space low, it can send info in it's ACK packet telling the sources to send lower amounts of data. Know how when you have a big empty pail, you can basically dump water into it really fast and it won't spill out because the pail is large enough for all the water? Well, if I replaced a pail with a little coffee cup, you'd have to pour the water a bit slower so it doesn't spill all over the place, and you can't hold as much water in the cup until you've already drank what's already in there. That's kinda what's happening here. If a destination is running out of space, it can also send an ACK saying it has a 0 byte size window, then the source will just send these packets called 'Keep Alive' packets. Let me know what you think. Send me a comment below or email us at [email protected] And be sure to check out our sister show, Hak5 for more great stuff just like this. I'll be there, reminding you to trust your technolust. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Bash Bunny Primer - Hak5 2225" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8j6hrjSrJaM -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 32812 Hak5
TCP Protocol introduction - bin 0x1A
 
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Before we continue with the network challenges, let's first introduce the TCP protocol properly. Using netcat and wireshark to understand it. HTTP Protocol episode: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=C_gZb-rNcVQ Join the discussion: https://www.reddit.com/r/LiveOverflow/comments/5fjgiv/tcp_protocol_introduction_bin_0x1a/
Views: 13345 LiveOverflow
Basics of TCP SACK
 
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Shows you how the TCP Selective Ack process works using the Expert Observer Protocol Analyzer to view the process.
Views: 6407 Mike Motta
How TCP Works - Sequence Numbers
 
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This video uses Wireshark to examine how the TCP Sequence numbers in TCP work. To keep the video brief, Acknowledgement numbers are explained in a separate video. Have trouble reading a trace file? Send it my way! www.packetpioneer.com/contact
Views: 14154 Chris Greer
TCP/IP Training  IPv4 Header
 
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An overview of the fields in the IPv4 header. Using Wireshark to examine TCP/IP SIP packets.
Views: 21496 TrainingCity
How TCP Works - MTU vs MSS
 
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In this video we will dig into the difference between the MTU and the TCP MSS. Both Ethernet and IP MTU's will be explained as well as how the MSS is set in each direction. The network can also adjust the TCP MSS. We will discuss why and how this would happen. Using Wireshark, we look at a TCP handshake and explain the MSS option. Got network problems? Let's get in touch. www.packetpioneer/contact
Views: 21769 Chris Greer
TCP/IP Explained (Hindi)
 
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Many of us have seen mysterious "TCP/IP options" in our network settings, but what is TCP/IP, and how does it enable the Internet to operate as it does? Connect with me: Google+: https://plus.google.com/u/0/117598490677039913870 Instagram: http://Instagram.com/tekanishk Twitter: http://twitter.com/tekanishk Facebook: http://facebook.com/tekanishk Youtube: http://http://youtube.com/c/tekanishk Thanks for watching... -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Instagram Shopping App - IG Shopping" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8_5iugwnHtU -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 23993 TeKanishk
Lecture - TCP Handshakes
 
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I made a mistake, Sequence Number and Acknowledgement Number fields are 32 bits not 16 bits as stated in this video.
Views: 22022 Nicholas Andre
Windows 7  Reset TCP/IP and Winsock [Tutorial]
 
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Topics addressed in this tutorial: reset tcp/ip, reset tcp ip stack Windows 7 reset winsock Windows 10 reset winsock catalog Windows 7 reset winsock win 10 reset winsock catalog Windows 10 netsh winsock reset netsh winsock reset Windows 10 netsh winsock reset catalog winsock reset Windows 8 reset winsock reset winsock Windows 7 how to reset winsock netsh winsock reset Windows 7 winsock reset Windows 10 winsock reset Windows 7 This tutorial will apply for computers, laptops, desktops,and tablets running the Windows 10, Windows 8/8.1, Windows 7 operating systems.Works for all major computer manufactures (Dell, HP, Acer, Asus, Toshiba, Lenovo, Samsung).
Views: 7323 MDTechVideos
Windows 7: reset tcp/ip and winsock
 
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TCP/IP is a set of protocols used to access the Internet and other networks. It is possible for the Windows software that deals with TCP/IP to become corrupt. This video uses Windows 7, but these commands work on Microsoft Windows Vista, XP, 2000, Windows Server 2003 and 2008. This video resets both the TCP/IP stack and winsock. The commands I use are: netsh int ip reset netsh winsock show catalog netsh winsock reset Providing training Videos since last Tuesday http://www.technoblogical.com Thanks for Watching!
Views: 174583 Chris Walker
Lecture - 31 TCP
 
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Lecture series on Computer Networks by Prof.S.Ghosh, Department of Computer Science & Engineering, I.I.T.,Kharagpur. For More details on NPTEL visit http://nptel.iitm.ac.in
Views: 81084 nptelhrd
TCP - Maximum Segment Size *** MSS
 
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In this video I discuss what MSS is and how different network conditions can affect its size. These are my custom Wireshark profiles for analyzing TCP segments. Windows Profile: http://bit.ly/2oMZlnX Linux Profile: http://bit.ly/2F7iY13
Views: 608 Jeff Pliska
TCP Header
 
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description of TCP header
Views: 31344 osischool
How to setup a static IP address and change DNS server
 
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This tutorial is for windows 7. However the steps are similar for vista and XP The DNS server i use is Google's public DNS server Written instructions. 1. Click on the start menu 2. In the search bar type cmd and hit enter 3. Type in the command line "ipconfig" 4. Scroll up to your connection; it should list the DNS suffix, ipv6 address, ipv4 address, subnet mask, and Gateway. 5. Either leave up the page or write down the IPv4 address, subnet mask, and Default Gateway 6. Click on the start menu again 7. In the search programs and files bar type "Network" 8. Click on "Network and sharing center" 9. On far left click the "change adapter settings" 10. Next right click on your internet connection 11. Choose properties 12. Double click on "internet protocol version 4(TCP/IPv4) 13. Tick the "use following IP address" 14. In the ip line type the IPv4 from command prompt 15. Same with the subnet and default gateway lines 16. Next tick the "use the following DNS server and addresses" 17. In the preferred DNS server type "8.8.8.8" and in alternative DNS type "8.8.4.4" this is Google's public DNS servers. 18. Click ok, and ok 19. Close the adapter settings page 20. Complete
Views: 324614 tinkertoes43055
TCP VS UDP | Difference between TCP and UDP Protocol With Animation & Live Example | 2018
 
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TCP vs UDP Protocol | Difference between TCP and UDP Protocol with live example using animation. TCP stands for Transmission Control Protocol and UDP stands for User Datagram Protocol. Download Networking Plus App: https://goo.gl/rks5wD Download soft copy: http://www.learnabhi.com/tcp-vs-udp/ TCP and UDP Protocol are both works under Transport layer of OSI Model. TCP is a connection oriented protocol which confirms the delivery of packets on the other hand UDP is connection less protocol which does not confirm the delivery of packets. TCP basically use while sending mail, online browsing, watch online videos on the other hand UDP are basically use for playing online games and video calling. TCP does error checking and error recovery on the other hand UDP does error checking but there is no option for error correction. If it find any error it simply going to drop the packets. Background Music: Pyres by Broken Elegance https://soundcloud.com/brokenelegance Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported— CC BY 3.0 http://creativecommons.org/licenses/b... Music provided by Audio Library https://youtu.be/9xMg_xdpa7w Visit my Website: www.learnabhi.com SUBSCRIBE: www.youtube.com/technicaltechabhi Subscribe to my Hindi Channel: www.youtube.com/learnabhi Follow me on: Facebook: www.facebook.com/learnabhisocial Instagram: www.instagram.com/learnabhi Twitter: www.twitter.com/learnabhi Download Networking Plus App: https://goo.gl/rks5wD
Views: 3060 TECHNICAL TECH
207 tcp_parse_options() API to parse TCP Options in Linux Kernel Networking Sub-system - episode7
 
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Visit The Linux Channel website: http://the-linux-channel.the-toffee-project.org/ Refer Kernel Source: http://lxr.free-electrons.com/source/include/net/tcp.h#L427 http://lxr.free-electrons.com/source/net/ipv4/tcp_input.c#L3771 http://lxr.free-electrons.com/source/include/net/tcp.h#L169 http://lxr.free-electrons.com/source/include/uapi/linux/tcp.h#L24 by Kiran Kankipati, Founder: The TOFFEE Project Website: http://www.the-toffee-project.org
Views: 726 The Linux Channel
Sharkfest 2013 - Inside the TCP Handshake (Betty DuBois)
 
01:17:28
This session was presented at Sharkfest 2013, UC Berkeley, CA All TCP streams begin with the handshake, yet so often its power to determine fault in low throughput, connection failures, and hideous user experience streams is unrecognized. If you can capture the handshake in Wireshark, troubleshooting time is greatly minimized. This session will cover the handshakes from the single required option to the complex option combinations, and how they affect the subsequent conversation. Both live capturing and trace files will be used in the session so bring your laptops! Betty DuBois recently joined Endace as a Senior Marketing Manager. She has been analyzing networks since 1997, performing fault isolations, application profiles, and network baselines for a wide variety of clients. As an Instructor for Wireshark University and other organizations, she has been widely recognized for her ability to make dry, complex subjects fun and interesting through humor and real-world examples. She has presented at Sharkfest and Networld+Interop, and her "Network Mystery" series can be found at www.wireshark.org/docs. Betty's industry certifications include Certified Wireshark University Instructor, Wireshark Certified Network Analyst, HP ProCurve AIS, and Sniffer Certified Expert.
Views: 30151 Chris Greer
TCP/IP Lesson: Internet Control Message Protocol (ICMP) - Overview of the Ping Command
 
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This lesson gives an overview of the ICMP protocol Ping and how it is used for troubleshooting TCP/IP network connectivity problems.
Views: 30782 edtecsdsu
Wireshark 101: TCP Streams and Objects, HakTip 120
 
08:11
On this week's episode of HakTip, Shannon Morse describes TCP Streams and how to decode packets in several formats. While running a packet capture in Wireshark, you may find that although the packets are all in one nice long list, some of them match up with others. An ex: would be if a user is visiting multiple sites, then you'll have a whole series of packets dedicated to one site, and another series dedicated to another site. They'll both end up in this long list depending one when they're captured, but they correspond with different streams. If you want to follow a specific stream of packets, right click the packet and choose "Follow TCP Stream" or "Follow UDP Stream". A new window will open and the filter will update in your main window. It'll say "tcp.stream eq #". tcp.stream is self explanatory. eq # will mean it'll equal associated with the stream followed for your packets. Under the "Go" menu, you can move around or use keyboard shortcuts to get to specific packets in your new stream. Withing that new TCP Stream menu, you'll see a listing of information about the packet stream that you just followed. This'll show you the entire conversation, or you can break it down into parts. You can change the view from Raw data, to C Arrays, a Hex dump, EBCDIC, or ASCII. (EBCDIC) Extended Binary Coded Decimal Interchange Code is an 8-bit character encoding used mainly on IBM mainframe and IBM midrange computer operating systems, just FYI... :) Right click on any packet and go to Decode As. This will allow you do decode any packet in another format. If you have a packet on the transport layer, you can decode that as any user specified protocol. Same with network and link. Each of these borrows from the OSI Model layers, so you'll notice some similarities there! Another cool option I wanted to share is the HTTP object list. Go to File --- Export Objects --- HTTP and you'll get a listing of all of your HTTP packets, which you can then save for later use. If I click on a .png that was downloaded... and click Save As... You'll now see the actual image saved on your desktop! Neat! Let me know what you think. Send me a comment below or email us at [email protected] And be sure to check out our sister show, Hak5 for more great stuff just like this. I'll be there, reminding you to trust your technolust. -~-~~-~~~-~~-~- Please watch: "Bash Bunny Primer - Hak5 2225" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8j6hrjSrJaM -~-~~-~~~-~~-~-
Views: 37375 Hak5
TCP/IP Lesson: Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP)
 
13:51
This lesson discusses the details of the Application Layer Protocol Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol (DHCP). This is the protocol that automatically gives you an IP address.
Views: 16145 edtecsdsu
SF17US - 22 Understanding Throughput & TCP Windows (Kary Rogers)
 
01:07:09
The title of this class is: "Understanding Throughput & TCP Windows: A Walk-Through of the Factors that can limit TCP Throughput Performance" and was taught by Kary Rogers. This was recorded on June 21st at Carnegie Mellon University, in Pittsburgh, PA. https://sharkfest.wireshark.org
Windows 7 - Configure TCP/IP Automatically using DHCP
 
03:38
Learn how to configure Windows 7 TCP/IP Automatically.
Views: 192491 brickhouselabs
best internet settings for minecraft (tcp tweaks and ethernet configuration)
 
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200 LIKES AND I'LL RELEASE MY RENDER SETTINGS OLD VIDEO: https://youtu.be/67ecbI53yPc DOWNLOAD TCP OPTIMIZER: https://www.speedguide.net/downloads.php comment if this helped you or not ;o TCP Optimizer basically just changes values in your registry (regedit) Ethernet Configurations can help with latency aswell _ 👾 Discord: https://discord.gg/Yq7THs2 💎 Twitter: https://twitter.com/imeevay ⬛ Pack: lmao what ⬜ Server IP: lmao what ⬛ Music Used: SONGS ft. SHILOH ⚙️ DPI: 1600 ⚙️ Minecraft Sensitivity: 40% ⚙️ Windows Sensitivity: 6th Tick (Default) ⚡ Graphics Card: GTX 1080 SC ⚡ CPU: i7 7800X (6-Core) 4.0 Ghz
Views: 5858 eevay
CSE473-11-3B: Internet Transport Layer Protocols: TCP and UDP (Part 2 of 4)
 
01:05:21
Part 2 of Audio/Video Recording of Professor Raj Jain's class lecture on Transport Layer: TCP and UDP. It covers Transport Layer Design Issues, Protocol Layers, Transport Layer, Transport Layer Functions, Multiplexing and Demultiplexing, Error Detection: Checksum, 1's Complement, Flow Control, Sliding Window Diagram, Stop and Wait Flow Control, Sliding Window Protocol Efficiency, Utilization: Examples, Effect of Window Size, Efficiency Principle, Error Control: Retransmissions, Go-Back-N ARQ, Selective Repeat ARQ, Selective Repeat: Window Size, Performance: Maximum Utilization, Performance Comparison, Transport Layer Design Issues, Homework 3A, UDP and TCP, Transports, User Datagram Protocol (UDP), TCP, TCP Segment Format, TCP Header Fields, TCP Options, TCP Checksum, TCP Connection Management, Example RTT estimation: Round Trip Time Estimation, Slow Start Congestion Control, AIMD Principle, Fast Recovery, TCP Congestion Control State Diagram, TCP Average Throughput, UDP and TCP: Homework 3B. See URL on slide bottoms to download slides. Based on Computer Networking: A Top-Down Approach by Kurose and Ross.
Views: 10003 Raj Jain
Windows® 7: How to change TCP/IP settings
 
03:10
Are you searching for the steps to change TCP/IP settings on a Windows® 7-based PC Content in this video is provided on an "as is" basis with no express or implied warranties whatsoever. Any reference of any third party logos, brand names, trademarks, services marks, trade names, trade dress and copyrights shall not imply any affiliation to such third parties, unless expressly specified.
Views: 10497 How-to Videos
Управление MagicQ через протокол TCP/IP и UDP
 
15:58
В этом уроке я продемонстрирую как можно управлять пультом ChamSys (в моем случае софтом MagicQ) через сетевой протокол UDP.
Views: 227 ChamSys Rus

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