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The Case For Coal (1984) National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) - coal strike
 
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A Campaign Video made for the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) and the wider Trade Union and Labour movement. Coal Not Dole. Produced by South Wales Miners' Video Project. and The Community Video Workshop, Cardiff. The miners' strike of 1984/1985 was major industrial action affecting the British coal industry. It was a defining moment in British industrial relations, and its defeat significantly weakened the British trades union movement. It was also seen as a major political and ideological victory for Margaret Thatcher and the Conservative Party. Coal was a nationalised industry and, as in most of Europe, was heavily subsidised. A number of mines ("pits") in the United Kingdom were profitable and remained open after the strike, including some operating as of 2007[1]. There were also a number of mines that were unprofitable and the government wanted to close. The viability of many of these mines was called into question but the government - in a hurry to avoid any further losses - closed many before reports were collated, instead of using temporary offers of increased redundancy pay to encourage miners into voting in favour of pit closures. In addition, all the mines required efficiency improvements in order to attain or increase their profitability, which was to be done by means of increased mechanisation. Many unions resisted this as it would necessarily result in job cuts. The strike became a symbolic struggle, since the miners' union was one of the strongest in the country. The strike ended with the defeat of the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) by the Conservative government, which then proceeded to consolidate its free market programme. The political power of the NUM was broken permanently. The dispute exposed deep divisions in British society and caused considerable bitterness, especially in Northern England and in South Wales. Ten deaths resulted from events around the strike, which is exceptional in the history of British industrial relations.
Views: 11633 PublicEnquiry
The trade union history of coal in the USA
 
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Coal mining in the Appalachian Mountains in the eastern United States. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mountaintop_removal_mining
Views: 132 visionontv
Trade Union Movement-Part Two, 1960s - Film 16921
 
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Demobilised soldiers after World War One, step off ships. Injured and crippled soldiers, many on crutches, march by. A funfair in 1918. Car workers on the factory floor. A London street during the depression of the early-1920s, with men standing around on street corners. Queues of unemployed men line a shopping street. A miner underground. Coal strike. Downing street. Union officials from the TUC White-collar workers dress up in overalls and to go work on the railways. Hyde Park Corner filled with milk churns. Meat being carted off a train. General strike. A deserted mining town. A packed labour exchange. Unemployed men standing in shop doorways. Photograph of Ernest Bevin, head of the transport workers. Walter Citrine?, the general secretary. The two men together. The Labour Government. The Cabinet under Ramsay Macdonald. Shells fly though the air. Bombing of a town at night. Firemen attempt to put out a blaze in an office block. Bevin shakes hands with George VI. A meeting of Labour politicians in the World War Two wartime coalition government.
S Africa plagued by mining crisis
 
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Miners gunned down by police, wildcat strikes as workers demand better treatment, and unions fighting sometimes violent turf wars. Many observers say South Africa's mining industry is in crisis. It's one of the world's most lucrative, with gold, platinum and diamonds among the minerals that bring in some $12bn annually. Our correspondents are standing by: Tania Page at a courthouse near Pretoria, and Haru Mutasa at a gold mine where thousands of workers are on strike. We also talk to Patrick Craven, the spokesman for South Africa's top trade union body in Johannesburg.
Views: 1082 Al Jazeera English
Exploring the  Mighty  Abandoned Union Mine. Awesome drop to the bottom in this abandoned mine!
 
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Major producer of Gold, Silver Copper, Zinc;Lead and even some Platinum. One of the biggest and longest producing mines in the area. Extensive tunneling on 4 levels huge vertical drops a mine you will want to see! One of my favorites! Join Frank and his dog, come explore this massive abandoned mine.
Ukraine: Child Labour in Mining
 
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(July 2005) In Ukraine, most legally-operated coal mines closed down following the break-up of the Soviet Union. Yet many families still dig for coal in illegal mines and children are expected to work, too. The International Labour Organization is working together with trade unions and the government to put an end to child labour and create new jobs. ** UKRAINE: LE TRAVAIL DES ENFANTS DANS LES MINES (Juillet 2005) En Ukraine, la plupart des mines de charbon exploitées légalement ont fermé après l'éclatement de l'Union soviétique. Pourtant, de nombreuses familles continuent d'exploiter illégalement le charbon dans des mines artisanales où le travail des enfants est considéré comme normal. L'Organisation internationale du Travail collabore avec les syndicats et le gouvernement pour éliminer le travail des enfants dans ces mines familiales et créer d'autres types d'emplois.
Copper mines in Zambia - Straight through Africa
 
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Trade is better than aid for Africa. They say. In a journey through copper thieves and mine barons in the north of Zambia, Bram Vermeulen investigates the truth behind that slogan. From a distance they look like ants, the hundreds of men digging holes in the rubble slopes of an old copper mine in Zambia. They are looking for copper ore in the walls of the enormous pit, without wearing helmets and without reinforcing the walls of their caves. Life-threatening, of course. But they find enough to live on. Is it legal, Bram asks. They laugh about it. No of course not. But the Chinese buyer does not really ask where they get their ore from. You just have to leave when the guards of the mine come. How different is it in a huge copper mine in full operation. Huge machines drive off and on. Sirens sound regularly, followed by explosions. Here, 300,000 tons of stone are moved every day, and the copper ore from it yields a profit of hundreds of millions of dollars a year. But it is a foreign company that raises that money. And if the productivity gets too low after about twenty years, the investors will move on. From the air it is easy to see how far-reaching it all is. The mine takes big chores out of the country and turns huge plains into a kind of lunar landscape. But other changes are also visible. Houses, schools, a golf course. Prosperity, therefore, emphasizes a mine boss. Seven years ago this was still a dull provincial town, and now look! A little further on the big changes are about to begin. There is a giant copper mine here, and for that an area of ​​no less than four hundred square kilometers is expropriated. The new owners promise economic prosperity. Did not a city like Johannesburg also start out as a simple mine? Naturally, people living in the area can not stay. They have worked the land for generations, but they can not show ownership documents. They have not been asked anything. They do get compensation for their houses, chickens and fruit trees, but not for the ground. "Everything under the ground is state property," says a representative of the mining company, "and that is what the state can rent out to us." Residents who do not want to leave are squatters who violate the law from that moment on. Even though they were born and lived there all their lives. Those former residents are moved to neat new houses outside the area. With toilet, and bigger than the previous house, but without land to grow food. Some of them seem satisfied with that. Most do not. 'In Africa, land has sentimental value. You are no one without land, 'says one of them. "So you're destroying these people. They will not pass on anything to the next generation. " Episode 6. Copper fever  For Africa, trade is better than aid, or so they say. On a journey to copper thieves and mine bosses, Bram Vermeulen investigates the truth behind the slogan. Director: Doke Romeijn and Stefanie de Brouwer © VPRO October 2014 On VPRO broadcast you will find nonfiction videos with English subtitles, French subtitles and Spanish subtitles, such as documentaries, short interviews and documentary series. This channel offers some of the best travel series from the Dutch broadcaster VPRO. Our series explore cultures from all over the world. VPRO storytellers have lived abroad for years with an open mind and endless curiosity, allowing them to become one with their new country. Thanks to these qualities, they are the perfect guides to let you experience a place and culture through the eyes of a local. Uncovering the soul of a country, through an intrinsic and honest connection, is what VPRO and its presenters do best. So subscribe to our channel and we will be delighted to share our adventures with you! more information at www.VPRObroadcast.com Visit additional youtube channels bij VPRO broadcast: VPRO Broadcast: https://www.youtube.com/VPRObroadcast VPRO Metropolis: https://www.youtube.com/user/VPROmetropolis VPRO Documentary: https://www.youtube.com/VPROdocumentary VPRO World Stories: https://www.youtube.com/VPROworldstories VPRO Extra: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCTLrhK07g6LP-JtT0VVE56A VPRO VG (world music): https://www.youtube.com/vrijegeluiden VPRO 3voor12 (alternative music): https://www.youtube.com/3voor12 VPRO 3voor12 extra (music stories): https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtgVYRLGraeL9rGMiM3rBHA www.VPRObroadcast.com English, French and Spanish subtitles by Ericsson and co-funded by the European Union.
Views: 3012 vpro world stories
Platinum Mining Companies are scheduled to hold crucial talks with mining trade union AMCU
 
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CEO's of Platinum Mining Companies are scheduled to hold crucial talks with mining trade union AMCU on Monday. The meeting is being facilitated by the Chamber of Mines and is aimed at trying to convince NUM's bitter rival to join the process of setting up a Centralised Bargaining Forum for the Platinum Mining sector which is seen as key to bringing about labour stability in the sector.
Views: 92 SABC Digital News
Gold mining companies urge unions to accept the 5% wage increase
 
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Gold mining companies have told unions that accepting a 5 percent wage increase fixed for the next 10 years will go a long way towards ensuring the sustainability of the struggling industry and saving jobs. This happened on the second day of the crucial wage negotiations between gold miners and trade unions NUM, AMCU, UASA and Solidarity in Johannesburg today. For more News visit: http://www.sabc.co.za/news Follow us on Twitter: https://twitter.com/SABCNewsOnline?lang=en Like us on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/SABCNewsOnline
Views: 87 SABC Digital News
Union leaders representing coal mining industry plead their case
 
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Painting the tops of coal piles green and then putting them onto rail cars might get the public to think differently about B.C. coal. That was among several messages which trade union leaders brought to a meeting of The Province editorial board on Thursday.
Views: 14 Vancouver Sun
The Tragedy Of Mount Isa - 1965
 
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Mount Isa, today very much a ghost town rather than Australia's largest copper producer and major source of lead and zinc. The industrial dispute stretching into months of deadlock has caused a complete shutdown of underground mining, and the resultant economic repercussion are little short of disastrous. Every working day this huge plant lies idle costs Australia a loss in export income of 135,000. Obviously, millions of pounds are involved. Intervening, the Queensland Govenment issued emergency orders in Council, principally aimed at preventing Labour Council President, McMahon, and unofficials miner's leader, Pat Mackie from returning to Mount Isa, after Trade union-Fund Raising discussions in Sydney. This is a memorial to Campbell Miles, who first discovered mineral in the Mount Isa area in 1923. In those days isa was a cattle town and transit point for the wide-spread stations throughout the channel country. It was, and still is, a hard, rugged expanse which could perhaps best enjoy the typical description of a "thirsty brown land". The hill country on the outskirts of Mount Isa, where prospectors search for the bonanza, and which, when it was found, turned out to be a virtual mountain of copper. Active mining commenced in 1932, and the first signs of a vast industry began to show. Isolated from civilization, the attraction of big money brought miners to work, and then to stay, with their families to work, as the town continued its growth. Preparing for compulsory conferences aimed at settlement, representatives of unions involved. JACK DEVERAUX, HARRY PEEBLES and COL. EMERY. Another official involved, the President of the Queensland Trades and Labour Council JACK EGERTON seen here with PAT MACKIE. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/2ca9f70be8134b618d7062aeff0fd328 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 11280 British Movietone
Turkish mine explosion: Anger on streets over deaths
 
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Trade unions in Turkey have announced a one-day strike in protest at the country's worst ever mine disaster which has claimed at least 282 lives. Union officials said the recent privatisation of the mining sector had made working conditions more dangerous, sparking protests in several cities. Ben Geoghegan reports.
Views: 706 Today's World News
One Global Village: Workers union strikes as Turkey mine death toll rises [May 15, 2014]
 
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NewsLife - One Global Village: Workers union strikes as Turkey mine death toll rises [May 15, 2014] (Reported By: Ysabella Cantu) For more news, visit: ►http://www.ptvnews.ph Subscribe to our youtube account: ►http://www.youtube.com/ptvphilippines Like our facebook page: ►PTV: http://facebook.com/PTVph ►Good Morning Boss: https://www.facebook.com/GMorningBoss ►[email protected]: http://facebook.com/PTVnewsat1 ►[email protected]: http://facebook.com/PTVnewsat6 ►NEWSLIFE: http://facebook.com/PTVnewslife ►PTV SPORTS: http://facebook.com/PTV4SPORTS Follow us at Twitter: ►http://twitter.com/PTVph Follow our livestream at ►http://ptvnews.ph/index.php/livestreammenu Ustream: ►http://www.ustream.tv/channel/ptv-livestream Watch our News Programs, every Monday to Friday Balitaan - 5:30 am - 7:00 am Good Morning Boss - 7:00 am - 9:00 am [email protected] - 1:00 pm - 2:30 pm PTV Sports - 5:00 pm - 6:00 pm [email protected] - 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm NewsLife - 9:15 pm - 10:30 pm Also tune in to our PUBLIC AFFAIRS SHOWS: Sunday: - [email protected] Junior Edition - 1:00 pm - 2:00 pm - PTV Weekend News - 6:00 pm - 7:00 pm - [email protected] (Replay) 8:00 PM - 9:00 PM Monday: - BizNews 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM Tuesday: - S.M.E. GO Negosyo 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM Wednesday: - PTV Special Forum 7:00 PM - 8:30 PM Thursday: - Personage with Carla Lizardo 7:00 PM Friday: - GSIS Member's Hour 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM - [email protected] 8:00 PM - 9:00 PM Saturday: - [email protected] The Week That Was - 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM - PTV Special Forum (Replay) 2:30 PM - 4:00 PM - The Doctor Is In 5:00 PM - 5:30 PM - PTV Weekend News - 6:00 PM - 7:00 PM - GSIS Member's Hour (Replay) 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM
Views: 55 PTV
President Zuma tells unions that the miners' strike has cost SA dearly
 
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(17 Sep 2012) 1. Wide pan of delegates at the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU) annual general meeting 2. Wide of union delegates singing and dancing in front of the stage 3. Close of South African president Jacob Zuma smiling on stage 4. Close two women wearing COSATU t-shirts reading (English) "Strengthen COSATU for total emancipation" 5. Wide of Zuma at the speakers podium 6. Wide union delegates singing and clapping in support of Zuma 7. SOUNDBITE (English) Jacob Zuma, President of South Africa: "Given the levels of violence and intimidation in Marikana, government deployed law-enforcement agencies to stabilise the situation. This does not take away the rights of miners and residents to protest peacefully and unarmed as provided for, in the laws of the land. The agencies have been told to be firm but to respect the rights of residents and strikers." 8. Cutaway delegate falling asleep 9. SOUNDBITE (English) Jacob Zuma, President of South Africa: "The National Treasury estimates that through its indirect impact on the economy, the strike actions in addition to other stoppages, have subtracted close to 3.1 (b) billion rand (388 (m) million US dollars) already from the national fiscus." 10. Wide Zuma singing from the stage 11. Close Zuma singing 12. Mid delegates singing and clapping STORYLINE South African President Jacob Zuma called on Monday for a speedy resolution to the mining strikes which have cost his country billions of rand in lost gold and platinum production this year. Zuma, speaking to a trade union congress in Johannesburg, said that this year's work stoppages have subtracted nearly 3.1 (b) billion rand (388 million US dollars) from the national treasury. He blamed poor living and working conditions of miners on the apartheid past and the failures of mining companies to honour a charter to improve the lives of miners. Zuma also said that heavy-handed police tactics on striking miners should not prevent the miners' right to protest. "Government deployed law-enforcement agencies to stabilise the situation. This does not take away the rights of miners and residents to protest peacefully and unarmed as provided for, in the laws of the land. The agencies have been told to be firm but to respect the rights of residents and strikers," Zuma said. Union rivalries and demands for better pay have stopped work at one gold and seven platinum mines. Aquarius Platinum said work resumed at its mine on Monday, and Anglo American Platinum said it would restart operations on Tuesday at its four mines under police security. London-registered Lonmin PLC told The Associated Press the company is losing production of 2,500 ounces each day the strike continues. Lonmin said Monday it is halting work on a new shaft and will not require 1,200 contract workers, among some 10,000 contract workers employed at the mine along with 28,000 employees. It is unclear how many miners are on strike in the different stoppages. Mining companies claim it is a minority with tens of thousands of workers not reporting for duty because of violent threats and intimidation. Previous marches by strikers brandishing machetes, spears and clubs have numbered several thousand. Lonmin said negotiations would continue on Monday after strikers last week rejected an offer of 16 to 21 percent pay increases that fell far short of the demands of striking rock drill operators for a minimum monthly take-home pay of 12,500 rand (1,560 US dollars). On Saturday, police fired rubber bullets and tear gas at a shantytown neighbouring Lonmin mine, where officers killed 34 miners on August 16 in attacks that shocked the nation of 48 (m) million. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/3c5f107b43eb28e1efd7f1596d1c8296 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 169 AP Archive
AMCU to go ahead with strike at Stillwater mine
 
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Trade Union AMCU is expected to forge ahead with its strike. This is in spite of management at Sibanye Stillwater declaring the strike unprotected. The mine insists that the other three unions, NUM, UASA and Solidarity have now become the majority union. This means that the wage agreement signed with the three unions will be extended across the board. Striking workers have until Saturday to return to work. For more news, visit: sabcnews.com
Views: 590 SABC Digital News
KAZAKHSTAN: COAL MINING INDUSTRY FACES ECONOMIC RUIN
 
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Russian/Nat Industrial unrest is growing in former Soviet Republic of Kazakhstan. The country's flagship industry - coal mining - is facing economic ruin in the wake of market reforms. Nearly one in five of Kazakhstan's pits have been shut down by strikes after miners went almost six months without pay. Clouds are gathering over the once-flourishing coal industry in the Central Asian republic of Kazakhstan. In its heyday, the Karaganda basin was key to the Soviet Union's mighty industrialisation programme. But now the region's mines are on the brink of catastrophe. Market reforms in the republic have severed generous subsidies from the pits, paralysing investment and wages. But the pit directors are forbidden to raise the price of coal to cover their debts. The mines are forced to provide coal to other industries - but many of these plants cannot pay them back for the energy. Formerly one of the Soviet Union's best rewarded professions, the payments crisis has left over 100-thousand mine workers unpaid for almost six months. The mine managers no longer try to hide the depth of the problem: SOUNDBITE: (In Russian) "The situation has now reached a critical point. We have been virtually unable to pay salaries since December and our debts just keep rising." SUPER CAPTION: Alexander Karev, Mine Director Four of the area's 22 pits are now on indefinite strike. Kazakh legislation all but throttles official trade union action. But the miners have sidestepped their unions and taken affairs into their own hands, organising local strike committees and sharing what little funds are at their disposal. Hostility towards the government is increasing: SOUNDBITE: (In Russian) "They don't care how ordinary workers live, what they have for lunch or dinner, how they can feed their children. We haven't been paid for our labour for six months now. They give us just a pittance and there's not much you can get for a pittance." SUPER CAPTION: Guseyn Khadzhiev, Miner Special shops for miners were once stacked with goods that were unavailable in regular Soviet stores. Now they are virtually barren. Despairing of the government and the ineffectiveness of their trade unions, thousands of miners have already fled Kazakhstan in search of work in neighbouring Russia and Ukraine. The Denishenkos live in a cramped apartment near the pits in Karaganda. Tanya, disabled since birth, is unable to work. Her husband Ivan supports her, their daughter and his mother-in-law: SOUNDBITE: (In Russian) "My family is beginning to starve. There's no money for food, no money for clothes, to say nothing of medicine. I have no idea how we can carry on." SUPER CAPTION: Ivan Denishenko, Miner Working conditions have worsened - 26 miners were killed in accidents last year. 35 miners at this pit refused to come to the surface since Thursday, announcing an indefinite hunger strike. A letter of protest was sent to the Kazakh president, Nursultan Nazarbayev, listing the miners' complaints. But so far there's been no reply and the men are in no mood for compromise as mines stand idle, apart from safety checks. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/95c80cbbcdfd7eb46560faf3ef8ec3e6 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 169 AP Archive
Leader addresses striking miners as talks with management continue
 
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Several thousand striking miners from the Lonmin platinum mine in Marikana, South Africa, converged on a nearby stadium on Thursday to listen to the demands put forward by their union leaders to mine bosses. Miners affiliated to the Association of Mineworkers and Construction Union (AMCU) sang and danced their way to the Wonderkop stadium, passing in front of the Lonmin platinum mine where many of them work. Razor wire and a heavy security presence had been set up outside the entrance to the mine to prevent any repeat of the 2012 violence that saw 34 striking miners gunned down by police. South Africa is the world's leading producer of platinum, which is used in medical, electronic and other industries. The miners are demanding a monthly entry-level wage for underground workers of the equivalent of 1,140 US dollars. That was still less than mine bosses spent on their pets, AMCU president Joseph Mathunjwa told the strikers at Wonderkop stadium. One mining company, Impala Platinum, has offered to increase the minimum wage for underground workers from about 800 to one-thousand dollars over a three-year period. It said the amount excluded benefits, including medical aid and overtime payments. The company said its offer was fair in a tough environment of rising costs and depressed global markets. Government officials have appealed for dialogue and say they will act decisively to enforce the law. There were no reports of violence as the strike began. In 2012, police shot and killed several dozen miners during labour unrest. An inquiry into the shootings is still under way. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/dd0e3a8c67bf5b00c1c16dea0ddaff50 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 756 AP Archive
Mine Workers Union and Rosh Pinah Zinc Corp. finally reach agreement
 
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by: Adolf Kaure --- The Mine Workers Union of Namibia (MUN) and Rosh Pinah Zinc Corporation reached an agreement on 18 April to resolve a legal strike which started on February 27 this year. General Secretary of MUN, Ebben Zarondo made the announcement of the agreement at a press conference in the capital yesterday.
Views: 103 One Africa TV
One year after Marikana massacre, gold miners set to strike over pay dispute
 
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The trade unions movements are asking for an increase between 60 and 100 % for mine workers. However, bosses said they will not be able to meet these demands. In the middle of these unreconciliable parties, the government, trying to avoid a second Marikana. Strike is expected to take place at 4. P.M., as the night-shift starts. Duplex with Ayesha Ismail, in Cape Town, South Africa. 09/03/2013 News LATEST NEWS - Watch the latest breaking news and information on the latest top stories, international, business, entertainment, politics, and more. With our correspondents all over the world in the field. FRANCE 24 INTERNATIONAL NEWS 24/7 http://www.france24.com
Views: 159 FRANCE 24 English
Trade Unions and Resistance to the Great War
 
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Class cohesion and spurious patriotism: trade union internationalism in the First World War In this talk Kevin Morgan considers the trade union radicals who from the earliest months of the war took up an internationalist and anti-war stance, and who gathered increasing support as the war went on. Their contribution to the anti-war movement has often been overlooked because of the unions’ majority pro-war stance. Nevertheless, this minority tradition was to receive a further stimulus with the Russian revolutions of 1917 and exercised a wide influence in the labour movement in the years following the war. In particular, Kevin will provide examples from the Furnishing Trades’ union, which proudly claimed to have been the one British union to have maintained contact with its German counterpart throughout the conflict. Through officers and activists like Alex Gossip, A.A. Purcell and Fred Bramley it also had a significant influence on the development of labour internationalism in Britain at this time. Kevin Morgan teaches politics and contemporary history at the University of Manchester. He has published widely on the left in twentieth-century Britain including biographies of Harry Pollitt and Ramsay MacDonald and a three-volume study Bolshevism and the British Left. Men on one hand, Coal on the other: The Forest of Dean Miners and the First World War 1910 – 1920 Ian Wright introduces his new book on the Forest of Dean Miners’ Association (FDMA) and WW1. Divergent attitudes to the war led to conflicts within the organisation, particularly over collaboration with the government, who sought to release men from the mines in order to send them to the front. Ian will examine how this practice was resisted by the Forest of Dean miners, some of whom eventually voiced their opposition to the war and how this led to the defeat of the pro-war leaders of the FDMA. This marked the ascendency of a more militant leadership which led the miners into direct struggle with the government in the final months of the war. More info here: http://www.brh.org.uk/site/events/trade-unions-resistance-great-war/
Views: 297 PermanentCultureNow
SOUTH AFRICA: ORKNEY: GOLD MINE ACCIDENT 56 BODIES RECOVERED
 
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English/Nat Searchers have now retrieved 56 bodies from the wreckage of a gold mine accident in Orkney, South Africa. The mine's owners, Anglo American, said no-one had survived the disaster and the country's most powerful union has accused them of gross negligence. By late Friday, searchers working 2,300 metres (1.4 miles) underground had pulled more than 56 bodies from a gold mine elevator that plunged down a shaft late on Wednesday night. The mine confirmed that there were no survivors among at least 100 gold miners in the two-floor elevator carriage that fell 500 yards (meters) after a locomotive dropped on it. The bodies of the miners had been recovered by rescue teams that cut into the smashed carriage. Almost 50 more were believed to still be in the wreckage. Workers wearing face masks and rubber gloves carried blanket-wrapped bodies on stretchers from a shaft elevator to waiting ambulances. Many workers at the mine came from neighboring countries or far away regions of South Africa, and the company said the switchboard was jammed with calls from relatives inquiring about their loved ones. Only a few of the 56 bodies recovered so far have been identified. The accident occurred when a mine locomotive went into a tunnel closed to locomotive traffic, broke through safety barriers and plunged down the shaft. It landed on an elevator carriage full of workers finishing the night shift, snapping the cable to send the carriage crashing to the bottom of the shaft. Officials said government investigators had questioned the driver of the locomotive, who was not in the vehicle when it fell into the shaft. President Nelson Mandela declared a day of mourning next week and promised speedy action on an upcoming government report on mine safety. Addressing a press conference later on Friday the most powerful trade union federation in South Africa slammed the mine's owners. SOUNDBITE: 'The blame should be placed before the mine bosses. And secondly we are saying that we don't believe that it was the first time that there has been a breach of health and safety. It's only that this time the result was tragic.' SUPER CAPTION: Sam Shilowa, General Secretary C.O.S.A.T.U. (Congress of South Africa Trade Union) South Africa is the world's leading gold producer and has some of the deepest mines. Accidents occur frequently and usually cause fatalities. SOUNDBITE: 'The key focus is that the sort of things were supposed to have been in place were not there and I think the mine bosses should be able to explain to us how come this sort of thing has been happening. SUPER CAPTION: Sam Shilowa, General Secretary C.O.S.A.T.U. (Congress of South Africa Trade Union) However, Anglo American has remained mum on possible causes of the tragedy. The driver of the deadly locomotive was apparently heavily sedated in hospital and the press were not allowed to speak to him. Anglo American regional manager Dick Fischer did speak to the press however - updating the progress being made with the rescue operation. SOUNDBITE: 'There is certainly no chance of any survivors. As we said yesterday, the bottom deck was most badly damaged. We have taken all of the remains of the people out of the top deck - it is completely empty and we have made the first cut into the bottom deck. We have taken four stretchers out of the bottom deck. ' SUPERCAPTION: Dick Fischer, Regional Manager, Anglo- American It is clear that the bodies in the lower deck of the cage have been mangled beyond recognition as grisly parcels not resembling any human form were brought to the surface. The nation's worst mining disaster occurred in 1960, when 437 workers were killed when trapped underground in a coal mine south of Johannesburg. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/99577a3eff8900a450910173bbc78f24 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 557 AP Archive
Ian Lavery, MP for Wansbeck: On Precariousness and Mining Communities
 
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Ian Lavery, MP for Wansbeck and Shadow Minister for Trade Unions and Civil Society, discusses the collective experiences and media portrayal of former mining communities
Blood Diamonds and Religious War: Diamonds and Division
 
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The Central African Republic is one of the poorest countries in the world, but it is also rich in natural resources. One of the official mining sectors has collapsed amid the country’s ongoing conflict, and now both sides are benefitting from the illicit trade of gold and diamonds. Clashes over control of the many mines have also created religious tension in places where there previously had been none. VICE News traveled to mines located in the heart of the Central African Republic to see how the battle over natural resources is playing out in one of the world’s most violent conflicts. Watch "The Human Cost of War in the Central African Republic" - http://bit.ly/15xC4L2 Watch "War in the Central African Republic" - http://bit.ly/1Ao5Qdx Read "UN Peacekeeper Released Hours After Being Kidnapped in the Central African Republic" - http://bit.ly/1Enj8O7 Read "Violence Escalates in Central African Republic as Thousands of Muslims Remain Trapped in the Country" - http://bit.ly/1yrNFpl Subscribe to VICE News here: http://bit.ly/Subscribe-to-VICE-News Check out VICE News for more: http://vicenews.com Follow VICE News here: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/vicenews Twitter: https://twitter.com/vicenews Tumblr: http://vicenews.tumblr.com/ Instagram: http://instagram.com/vicenews More videos from the VICE network: https://www.fb.com/vicevideos
Views: 424361 VICE News
Durham Miners Gala - a taster
 
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Saturday the 8 July 2017 will be the 133rd Durham Miners Gala. The Gala is now one of the biggest and most colourful celebrations of trade union solidarity and community spirit.
Views: 4734 UniteTheUnion
Kentucky: Coal Miners fighting for renewable energy
 
18:19
Coal miners from one of the centres of historic militancy of the U.S. trade union movement organising to end coal and move to renewable energy.
Views: 19 ReelNews
Efforts made to reopen two Mpumalanga mines
 
02:02
Efforts are being made to re-open the Lily and Barbrook mines in Barberton, Mpumalanga. trade Union, COSATU has informed workers who used to work at the mines that two international investors have shown interest in resuming operations at both mines. Lily Mine suspended operations after the mine caved in last year in February - trapping at least three workers who's bodies are yet to be retrieved. Barbrook was subsequently closed due to financial challenges. For more news, visit: http://www.sabc.co.za/news
Views: 211 SABC Digital News
Trade unions on 48-hour 'Bharat Bandh', key services likely to take big hit
 
01:16
Trade unions on 48-hour 'Bharat Bandh', key services likely to take big hit
Views: 1111 ETV Andhra Pradesh
AMCU embarks on a national strike next week
 
02:10
Trade union AMCU is to embark on a national strike next week to protest against job losses in mining and other sectors of the economy. The one-day socio-economic strike will involve marches to government offices in Welkom, Polokwane, Durban and the main march, to the Union Buildings in Pretoria. For more news, visit: sabcnews.com
Views: 912 SABC Digital News
Turkey: Unions to hold strike over mining disaster
 
03:01
Turkish labour unions have called for a national one-day strike in protest against the country's worst industrial disaster, which claimed at least 282 lives in a coal mine. For more news stories visit: http://www.twnd.in/ Connect with us on Social platform at: http://www.facebook.com/theworldnewsdigest Subscribe to our YouTube Channel: https://www.youtube.com/user/fairfest
Views: 4 Jenny McCArthy
Thousands strike as trouble flares at South African mine
 
00:47
South Africa's mining sector has again been hit by unrest. ... euronews, the most watched news channel in Europe Subscribe for your daily dose of international news, curated and explained:http://eurone.ws/10ZCK4a Euronews is available in 13 other languages: http://eurone.ws/17moBCU http://www.euronews.com/2013/06/14/thousands-strike-as-trouble-flares-at-south-african-mine South Africa's mining sector has again been hit by unrest. Up to 4,000 workers have staged a sit-in strike underground in protest at the firing of four union leaders. The workers at the Anglo American Platinum (Amplats) mine near Rustenburg in Pretoria say they won't leave the mine until the four are reinstated. The leaders of the AMCU union were suspended after allegations they submitted fraudulent membership applications in a bid to inflate union numbers. There has been bitter rivalry between the AMCU and NUM unions, resulting in strikes and assassinations. Vice president of the ANC, Kgalema Mothlante announced on Friday that the unions had reached an agreement. Find us on: Youtube http://bit.ly/zr3upY Facebook http://www.facebook.com/euronews.fans Twitter http://twitter.com/euronews
Sibanye shutdown | thousands of AMCU-affiliated workers strike
 
05:40
More than 15-thousand workers affiliated to trade union AMCU have downed tools at all the Sibanye-Stillwater gold mines across the country. This comes after negotiations between management and the union deadlocked over workers' wages and safety. Union president Joseph Mathunjwa says a lack of investment by mining companies is negatively affecting the safety of workers. He says the top ten executives earn millions of rand a month including bonuses but are refusing to give workers a 12-thousand-500-rand minimum wage. Our reporter Aphumelele Mdlalane is at the Sibanye still water in Theunissen and she joins us. For more news, visit: sabcnews.com
Views: 1221 SABC Digital News
NUM Miners' Strike Campaign Videotape Project.  3, Solidarity (1984)
 
13:07
Vintage tapes from the 1984/5 UK Miners' strike. This one particularly looking at the previous 1970s miners' strike and the vast support miners had from other trades unionists. Produced for the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) with financial help from groups and individuals from right across the social justice and trades union movement. It was recognised before the strike had even begun that mainstream press, newspapers, television and radio would be inherantly biased for the establishment and against the miners' struggle. Having said that there was an inherent contradiction in striking, that is closing pits, in order to keep them open. This fundamental problem smacked of lack of imagination by the NUM who, with hindsight, may have been better off occupying the pits to keep them working rather than going on strike. Anyway, hundreds of thousands of miners lost their jobs in this battle as one small part of a globalisation agenda hatched by Victor Rothschild and Margaret Thatcher which left British industry deccimated. Miners' Campaign Videotape Project 3 - Solidarity (1984) The miners' strike of 1984/1985 was major industrial action affecting the British coal industry. It was a defining moment in British industrial relations, and its defeat significantly weakened the British trades union movement. It was also seen as a major political and ideological victory for Margaret Thatcher and the Conservative Party. The strike became a symbolic struggle, since the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM) was one of the strongest in the country, viewed by many, including Conservatives in power, as having brought down the Heath government in its 1974 strike. The strike ended with the miners' defeat and the Thatcher government able to consolidate its free market programme. The political power of the NUM was broken permanently. The dispute exposed deep divisions in British society and caused considerable bitterness, especially in Northern England and in South Wales. Ten deaths resulted from events around the strike. Trade Films, 26 Bottle Bank, Gateshead, Tyne & Wear, NE8 2AR. Tel. 0632 775532 Trade Films
Views: 3477 PublicEnquiry
CYRIL RAMAPHOSA~MOYA CR17 2ND VIDEO
 
04:30
Biography : Matemela Cyril Ramaphosa (born 17 Nov ,1952) is a South African lawyer, trade union leader, activist, politician and businessman. Married to Dr Tshepo Motsepe and they have four children There will be liberation, come rain or shine. I am optimistic about the future of South Africa. I think we have a great future ahead. In the ANC, we have a lot of talented leaders." Ramaphosa himself is regarded as one of the most important leaders in the ANC. His election to the position of secretary general at the ANC Conference in June 1991 is proof of the faith members have in him. Widely respected as a skilful and formidable negotiator and strategist, Ramaphosa is best known for the role he played in building the biggest and most powerful trade union in the country, the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM).Ramaphosa was born in Soweto on 17 November 1952. After completing matric, he registered at the University of the North to study law in 1972. While at university Ramaphosa joined the South African Students Organisatio (SASO), and the Black Peoples' Convention (BPC). In 1974 he was detained and held in solitary confinement for 11 months for his role in the organisation of pro-Frelimo rallies. In 1976 he was detained for a second time, and held for six months. During this time he began to question his role in the BPC, deciding that the "ideology of black consciousness had come full circle, it could take us no further". After completing his law studies in 1981, Ramaphosa joined the Council of Unions of South Africa (CUSA) as a legal advisor. In 1982 CUSA advised Ramaphosa to start a union for mine workers. The union that was to become "a thorn in the flesh of mine bosses" had very humble beginnings. There were no funds to run the union and recruiting was difficult as mine bosses would not allow meetings to take place on mine premises. Ramaphosa, clad in a black leather jacket, would move around the goldfields at weekends, recruiting mine workers. The NUM was launched in 1982, and Ramaphosa was elected to the position of general secretary, a position he held until he resigned from the union in 1991 (following his election to SG of the ANC). In one decade, immeasurable improvements were made in the living conditions and working standards of the country's largest work force. The union grew from a membership of 6,000 in 1982 to 300,000 in 1992, giving it control of nearly half of the total black work force in the mining industry. In 1985 NUM left CUSA and helped in the formation of the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU). When COSATU joined forces with UDF against the Botha regime, Ramaphosa played a central role, leading him into the arena of the Mass Democratic Movement (MDM). When Mandela was released Ramaphosa was on the National Reception Committee. Ramaphosa played a crucial role in negotiations with the former South African regime to bring about a peaceful end to apartheid and steer the country towards its first democratic elections in April 1994. While not a member of the SACP, Ramaphosa is a committed socialist who believes that the dawn of political democracy in South Africa must be accompanied by economic democracy. "Democracy will be meaningless unless it can lead to the transformation of the quality of life of all our people," he says. Listening to the cool sounds of jazz musician, John Coltrane, is a favourite pastime. Ramaphosa also enjoys tennis, trout fishing and watching motor-racing. He is an avid reader with a particular interest in biographies. Ramaphosa is a sophisticated political thinker, a powerful negotiator and a leader of great integrity. He is one of the most outstanding figures of his generation. On 24 May 1994 Ramaphosa was elected chairperson of the new Constitutional Assembly. After he lost the race to become President of South Africa to Thabo Mbeki, he resigned from his political positions in January 1997 and moved to the private sector, where he became a director of New Africa Investments Limited. He remains a National Executive Member of the African National Congress. While not a member of the South African Communist Party (SACP), Ramaphosa has claimed that he is a committed socialist. The media continually speculates on Ramaphosa joining the race for the presidency of the ANC in 2006, before the 2009 South African Presidential Elections . However, he has stated that he is not interested in the presidency.
Views: 15501 Zwoitea Production
Mining workers flex muscles
 
02:58
In what is seen as a show of strength ahead of the April 12 Lok Sabha polls, Goa's mining workers marched the streets of Panjim to showcase their numbers and seemingly send a strong message to the political parties in contention for the two Goa Lok Sabha seats. The protest march was organised under the banner of the All India Trade Union Congress, the trade union wing of the Communist Party of India. Both the CPI candidates Suhas Naik and Raju Mangueshkar addressed the workers alongwith CPI state secretary Christopher Fonseca. Fonseca alleged that managements of Goa's mining firms are waiting in the wings to retrench workers citing the to-be-imposed annual volume cap of 20 million tonnes on mining.
Views: 232 ingoanews
The Warrains - Our MUA
 
03:57
Maritime Union of Australia The Maritime Union of Australia (MUA) is one of the oldest trade unions in Australia with a membership base of some 13,500 members nationally. In the past, many songs have been written about the MUA (including the famous 'Roll On' by the Living End in 1999) however, the union definitely needed a song they could call their own. Retired life member of the MUA and former waterside worker from Western Port Bay and part time poet Barry Swayn wrote the inspiring lyrics for his sons song "Our MUA" and by doing so contributed to a prize winning entry in a recent music competition held by the MUA. The Warrains front man Chris Swayn wrote the music for "Our MUA", which captures the history of both the Waterside Workers' Federation of Australia (WWF) and the Seamen's Union of Australia (SUA). In 1993 both unions amalgamated to form one of Australia's most influential and progressive unions this country has ever seen the mighty Maritime Union of Australia (MUA). The Warrains herald from the lower end of Victoria's Mornington Peninsula and have been playing over the past seven years largely around their home town. The group comprises of Chris Swayn (guitar, vocals) Sophie Pound (bass, vocals) Grant Macmillan (guitar, vocals) and Brendan White (drums). Edited & posted by Jamie McMechan Maritime Union of Australia - Film Unit. Australian Manufacturing Workers Union (AMWU) http://www.amwu.asn.au/ Australian Services Union (ASU) http://www.asu.asn.au/ Australian Workers Union (AWU) http://www.awu.net.au/ Construction Forestry Mining & Energy Union (CFMEU) http://www.cfmeu.asn.au/ Electrical Trades Union (ETU) http://www.etunational.asn.au/ Maritime Union Of Australia (MUA) http://www.mua.org.au/ Public Service Association of NSW (PSA) http://www.psa.labor.net.au/ Unions NSW (Unions NSW) http://www.unionsnsw.org.au/ Australian Council Of Trade Union (ACTU) http://www.actu.org.au/ International Transport Workers' Federation (ITF) http://www.itfglobal.org/ International Trade Union Confederation (ITUC) http://www.ituc-csi.org/
And Still They Came - TUC March & Rally for Jobs & Recovery (1992)
 
12:26
And Still They Came Britain Can't Work Without Jobs TUC The Government's treatment of the Miners and their families was shabby and unjust. What's more, they took no account of Britain's future energy needs. And they showed no sign of adopting policies that would put Britain back to work. These were matters that affected not just the miners but every one of us. That Sunday, people showed that they were offended by the government's actions. And they wanted policies that will create jobs, not destroy them. Britain Can't Work Without Jobs. Trade Union Congerss (TUC) march and rally for jobs and recovery. October 25th 1992. TUC Campaign for Jobs and Recovery a year after the biggest trade union movement demonstration in decades, are coal mines shutting and coal privatisation featuring in the Queen's Speech of government business? The Tories were confident there would be no resistance to their pit closure plans announced in October last year. The miners' union had been gutted by its defeat in the 1984-85 strike. But resistance, when it came, was not centred on the pits and mining communities. It erupted across the working class, with millions of workers looking for a focus to channel their bitterness. This situation presented both enormous opportunities and enormous problems for the TUC and NUM leaders. The TUC leaders wanted to use the anger to force the government to take them seriously again. But the 'new realist' agenda of class collaboration created amidst the defeats of the 1980s prevented them from taking advantage of the militant mood among workers. The miners' leaders had different problems. The mood among the working class generally was far more angry and combative than it was among their own members. TUC
Views: 443 PublicEnquiry
S Africa trade union alliance faces tough election
 
02:25
Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Subscribe to our channel http://bit.ly/AJSubscribe Miners in South Africa are continuing their strike and while many have blamed union rivalry and the main union's disconnect from its members, its parent union federation, the Congress of South Africa's Trade Unions (Cosatu) is about to begin its national conference. Cosatu represents more than two million workers, from various sectors, and was formed during the fight against apartheid. It is also a cornerstone alliance partner to the country's ruling African National Congress, which also faces its tightly contested party elections later this year. In an exclusive report, Al Jazeera's Mike Hanna reporting from Johannesburg, speaks to a founding member of the organisation, Jay Naidoo. At Al Jazeera English, we focus on people and events that affect people's lives. We bring topics to light that often go under-reported, listening to all sides of the story and giving a 'voice to the voiceless.' Reaching more than 270 million households in over 140 countries across the globe, our viewers trust Al Jazeera English to keep them informed, inspired, and entertained. Our impartial, fact-based reporting wins worldwide praise and respect. It is our unique brand of journalism that the world has come to rely on. We are reshaping global media and constantly working to strengthen our reputation as one of the world's most respected news and current affairs channels. Social Media links: Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/aljazeera Instagram: https://instagram.com/aljazeera/?ref=... Twitter: https://twitter.com/ajenglish Website: http://www.aljazeera.com/ google+: https://plus.google.com/+aljazeera/posts
Views: 998 Al Jazeera English
NUM says one of its members was stabbed to death at AMPLATS
 
01:55
The National Union of Mineworkers says one of its members was stabbed to death at AMPLATS' platinum mine in Rustenberg while going to work . Its the fifth such killing in the past two weeks. This comes as the world's top platinum producers and trade union AMCU are continuing with Labour Court-mediated wage talks. They're aimed at ending the longest and costliest mining strike in South African history.
Views: 222 SABC Digital News
Unions demonstrate at Glencore shareholders' meeting
 
02:37
Representatives of Glencore trade unions from across the world demonstrate at the shareholders' meeting in Zug, Switzerland on 2 May 2018
Views: 218 IndustriALL_GU
Industrial relations in the British mining industry in the interwar period part one of three
 
10:05
Industrial relations in the British mining industry in the interwar period with interviews with miners, managers and representatives of the coal owners. I no longer possess either the beginning or the end of this film which was recorded from the television in the late 1980s. We may not know how it started but we know how it ended! I do not know if this is copyright material as I was unable to contact the possible owner to ask permission to publish it.
Views: 2876 Alan Heath
Anglo Platinum mineworkers reject  9%  wage offer
 
03:35
Mineworkers at Anglo Platinum in Rustenburg have rejected a 9% wage offer from their employer. This is the offer made by platinum mining companies, Amplats, Implats and Lonmin, for the next three years. Trade union, Amcu, downed tools last Thursday at the three platinum producers, demanding a R 12 500 entry-level salary per month. The companies' latest offer is an improvement on their earlier one of between seven and a half and eight and a half percent. As the strike continues, both the union and the mine houses are losing millions of rands. For the latest we are now joined live from Rustenburg by SABC Reporter, Mothupi Sekhakhu.
Views: 329 SABC Digital News
South African Union Officials Urge Leader To Sign Deal To End Platinum Strike
 
01:06
Shop stewards from South Africa's striking AMCU mining union urged leader Joseph Mathunjwa to sign a wage deal with the three major platinum firms on Thursday at a dramatic mass rally crowning nearly five months of industrial action. Cheers erupted from the crowd of thousands of miners as one senior union official took the microphone to declare: "Sign, Mathunjwa, sign.".... "This union has worked. We want this money. We come from hardships. AMCU has worked. We can't take kids to school. Sign Mathunjwa," another union leader added. Earlier, the three platinum firms - Anglo American Platinum, Impala Platinum and Lonmin- said they had reached "in principle undertakings" with the leaders of the longest strike in the history of South Africa's mines. They did not disclose details of the offer. http://feeds.reuters.com/~r/Reuters/worldNews/~3/jmDg1kWsfj4/story01.htm http://www.wochit.com
Views: 21 Wochit News
RUSSIA: MOSCOW: NEGOTIATIONS UNDERWAY TO END MINERS' STRIKE
 
01:59
Russian/Eng/Nat Russian and Ukrainian government officials have met trade union leaders in the two countries to try to end a strike by more than a (m) million coal miners. The strike is the largest walkout in the former Soviet Union since it collapsed in 1991. The miners are demanding (m) millions of dollars in back wages. They are also seeking to change their wages and benefits systems. Fed up with poor economic conditions, more than one (m) million miners walked off their jobs Thursday in coordinated protests extending from Ukraine's Donbass region to eastern Siberia. They are seeking hundreds of (m) millions of dollars in back wages and a restructuring of the pay and subsidies system in their industry. The coal mining industry is still state-owned in both former Soviet republics. Union leaders said Friday that about 450-thousand Russian miners were on strike, with 170 of the nation's 245 mines shut down. Analysts say the strike is of huge political significance. SOUNDBITE: (English) "It's frustration. And the miners perhaps feel it more acutely and they show it and this is symbolic. So this miners strike is very symbolic and that's why politically it's so significant." SUPER CAPTION: Dmitry Trenin, Analyst Carnegie Endowment For Peace The Russian miners say they are owed 200 ( m) million dollars, and the Ukrainians say they are owed 367 (m) dollars. The Russian government contends it has fully paid its back debt of 125 (m) million to the industry. But they admitted that January's wages have not been paid. SOUNDBITE: (Russian) "The government has admitted that they have not paid their share for January. The problem has been solved by a directive issued by the President." SUPER CAPTION: Yuri Shafrannik, Fuel and Energy Minister President Boris Yeltsin- who is expected to announce his reelection bid in mid-February- hopes to end the strike without have to pay out huge amounts of money before an election campaign begins. Some politicians contend the government will have no choice but to spend money before the elections. SOUNDBITE: (English) "Before the elections the government will be forced to pay some money to cover some social problems in the main spheres, not only in the coal regions." SUPER CAPTION: Galina Starovoitova, Democrat This is the largest walkout in the former Soviet Union since its fall in 1991. The coal union is Russia's biggest and most powerful and its support helped secure the presidency for Yeltsin in 1991. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/da9ff818a20c6b832057729ee5fa73d7 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 21 AP Archive
TRAILER Kentucky: Coal Miners fighting for renewable energy
 
03:40
Coal miners from one of the centres of historic militancy of the U.S. trade union movement organising to end coal and move to renewable energy.
Views: 39 ReelNews
RUSSIA: MINERS BEGIN ONE DAY STRIKE
 
02:00
Russian/Nat Russia's miners began a one-day strike Wednesday aimed at forcing the government to pay a wage backlog of billions of dollars. Over 80 per cent of Russia's miners are taking part in the protest which will be followed by an all-out strike next month if the government does not meet their demands. APTV has been to Rostov-on -Don to speak with miners who have already been on strike for a week. At stake is billions of dollars in back pay and political stability in Moscow. Over half a million coal miners in Russia haven't been paid since November, they say they cannot survive any longer. The last nationwide miners' strike in 1989 crippled the country and eventually led to the fall of President Mikhail Gorbachev and the collapse of the Soviet Union. Rostov's 26 mines have been on strike since the start of the month, 700-thousand miners here say that they have had no money and that badly-needed repairs to their mines aren't being financed. One thousand miles south of Moscow, the area produces over three and a half thousand tons of coal per day. But for the last week the only men to go down the mine shafts have been those responsible for safety. A recent accident left two men dead and five in hospital. Rostov's striking coal miners have voted to return to work Thursday, only to prepare the mines for a complete walkout planned for March 1st. The miners see only one solution to the problem. SOUNDBITE: (RUSSIAN) "Our political demands? The President and the government have led the country into a dead-end with their reforms. They bear responsibility. They have shown that they are incapable of running the country. So we have only one demand - the President and the government should resign." SUPER CAPTION: Viktor Budtsev, Chairman Coal Trade Union. A nationwide strike would have catastrophic consequences throughout Russia. Coal currently accounts for more than 80 per cent of fuel used in central heating systems all over Russia and provides over half of the fuel consumed by the country's thermoelectric plants. Throughout the strike Rostov has continued to deliver some coal to the nearby electric power station in Novocherkassk, the main provider of electricity to the region. But despite this the station is only running at half power. For the moment Rostov's miners will go back to work. The government has given in and agreed to pay them some of what they are owed. But these miners have heard promises before, they are ready to step up action. An nationwide strike in March could cripple the nation's economy and lead to a confrontation with the President they brought to power. You can license this story through AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/metadata/youtube/e7e61e1d4fb9792c19dbb10aeb24c1f6 Find out more about AP Archive: http://www.aparchive.com/HowWeWork
Views: 48 AP Archive
CYRIL RAMAPHOSA~WE LOVE YOUCR17 3rd VIDEO
 
03:06
Biography : Matemela Cyril Ramaphosa (born 17 Nov ,1952) is a South African lawyer, trade union leader, activist, politician and businessman. Married to Dr Tshepo Motsepe and they have four children There will be liberation, come rain or shine. I am optimistic about the future of South Africa. I think we have a great future ahead. In the ANC, we have a lot of talented leaders." Ramaphosa himself is regarded as one of the most important leaders in the ANC. His election to the position of secretary general at the ANC Conference in June 1991 is proof of the faith members have in him. Widely respected as a skilful and formidable negotiator and strategist, Ramaphosa is best known for the role he played in building the biggest and most powerful trade union in the country, the National Union of Mineworkers (NUM). Ramaphosa was born in Soweto on 17 November 1952. After completing matric, he registered at the University of the North to study law in 1972. While at university Ramaphosa joined the South African Students Organisatio (SASO), and the Black Peoples' Convention (BPC). In 1974 he was detained and held in solitary confinement for 11 months for his role in the organisation of pro-Frelimo rallies. In 1976 he was detained for a second time, and held for six months. During this time he began to question his role in the BPC, deciding that the "ideology of black consciousness had come full circle, it could take us no further". After completing his law studies in 1981, Ramaphosa joined the Council of Unions of South Africa (CUSA) as a legal advisor. In 1982 CUSA advised Ramaphosa to start a union for mine workers. The union that was to become "a thorn in the flesh of mine bosses" had very humble beginnings. There were no funds to run the union and recruiting was difficult as mine bosses would not allow meetings to take place on mine premises. Ramaphosa, clad in a black leather jacket, would move around the goldfields at weekends, recruiting mine workers. The NUM was launched in 1982, and Ramaphosa was elected to the position of general secretary, a position he held until he resigned from the union in 1991 (following his election to SG of the ANC). In one decade, immeasurable improvements were made in the living conditions and working standards of the country's largest work force. The union grew from a membership of 6,000 in 1982 to 300,000 in 1992, giving it control of nearly half of the total black work force in the mining industry. In 1985 NUM left CUSA and helped in the formation of the Congress of South African Trade Unions (COSATU). When COSATU joined forces with UDF against the Botha regime, Ramaphosa played a central role, leading him into the arena of the Mass Democratic Movement (MDM). When Mandela was released Ramaphosa was on the National Reception Committee. Ramaphosa played a crucial role in negotiations with the former South African regime to bring about a peaceful end to apartheid and steer the country towards its first democratic elections in April 1994. While not a member of the SACP, Ramaphosa is a committed socialist who believes that the dawn of political democracy in South Africa must be accompanied by economic democracy. "Democracy will be meaningless unless it can lead to the transformation of the quality of life of all our people," he says. Listening to the cool sounds of jazz musician, John Coltrane, is a favourite pastime. Ramaphosa also enjoys tennis, trout fishing and watching motor-racing. He is an avid reader with a particular interest in biographies. Ramaphosa is a sophisticated political thinker, a powerful negotiator and a leader of great integrity. He is one of the most outstanding figures of his generation. On 24 May 1994 Ramaphosa was elected chairperson of the new Constitutional Assembly. After he lost the race to become President of South Africa to Thabo Mbeki, he resigned from his political positions in January 1997 and moved to the private sector, where he became a director of New Africa Investments Limited. He remains a National Executive Member of the African National Congress. While not a member of the South African Communist Party (SACP), Ramaphosa has claimed that he is a committed socialist. The media continually speculates on Ramaphosa joining the race for the presidency of the ANC in 2006, before the 2009 South African Presidential Elections . However, he has stated that he is not interested in the presidency.
Views: 12487 Zwoitea Production
Miners Shot Down - Marikana Massacre - Full Documentary - 2014
 
01:25:51
In August 2012, mineworkers in one of South Africa’s biggest platinum mines began a wildcat strike for better wages. Six days later the police used live ammunition to brutally suppress the strike, killing 34 and injuring many more. Using the point of view of the Marikana miners, Miners Shot Down follows the strike from day one, showing the courageous but isolated fight waged by a group of low-paid workers against the combined forces of the mining company Lonmin, the ANC government and their allies in the National Union of Mineworkers. What emerges is collusion at the top, spiralling violence and the country’s first post-apartheid massacre. South Africa will never be the same again.
Views: 10283 Uhuru Digital
Bolivia: Gov't, Miners Union Negotiating Agreement
 
00:35
Following weeks of protests, some of them violent, Bolivian government officials and leaders of the miners union and social organizations have sat down to negotiate an agreement. The Potosí Civic Committee (Comcipo), an umbrella organization comprised of labor unions and civil society groups, have been on strike since July 6 demanding the government provide more public services and employment opportunities as well as various public works projects. teleSUR http://multimedia.telesurtv.net/v/bolivia-govt-miners-union-negotiating-agreement/
Views: 37 TeleSUR English

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