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Search results “Monetary policy and foreign exchange reserves”
Using reserves to stabilize currency | Foreign exchange and trade | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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How a central bank could use foreign currency reserves to keep its own currency from devaluing Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/currency-reserves/v/speculative-attack-on-a-currency?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/currency-reserves/v/accumulating-foreign-currency-reserves?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 102059 Khan Academy
Accumulating foreign currency reserves | Foreign exchange and trade | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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How and why a central bank would build foreign currency reserves Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/currency-reserves/v/using-reserves-to-stablize-currency?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/current-capital-account/v/why-current-and-capital-accounts-net-out?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 123215 Khan Academy
What's all the Yellen About? Monetary Policy and the Federal Reserve: Crash Course Economics #10
 
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This week on Crash Course Economics, we're talking about monetary policy. The reality of the world is that the United States (and most of the world's economies) are, to varying degrees, Keynesian. When things go wrong, economically, the central bank of the country intervenes to try aand get things back on track. In the United States, the Federal Reserve is the organization that steps in to use monetary policy to steer the economy. When the Fed, as it's called, does step in, there are a few different tacks it can take. The Fed can change interest rates, or it can change the money supply. This is pretty interesting stuff, and it's what we're getting into today. Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 732712 CrashCourse
Monetary Policy: Money Creation in a Fractional Reserve Banking System
 
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In this video we illustrate the process by which money is created in a fractional reserve banking system. Due to the fact that at any given time a bank must only keep a certain percentage of its total deposits on reserve, an initial deposit of a certain amount of money will be multiplied as the bank loans out any excess reserves, whose spending leads to further new deposits and even further loans in the economy. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 125185 Jason Welker
Milton Friedman on Money / Monetary Policy (Federal Reserve) Part 1
 
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Views: 21102 BasicEconomics
Speculative attack on a currency | Foreign exchange and trade | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/currency-reserves/v/financial-crisis-in-thailand-caused-by-speculative-attack?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/forex-trade-topic/currency-reserves/v/using-reserves-to-stablize-currency?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 117295 Khan Academy
Floating vs. Fixed Exchange Rates- Macroeconomics 5.4
 
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Float it or fix it? Mr. Clifford expalins the difference between floating and fixed exchange rates and how countries peg the value of their currency to another currency. Make sure to watch this video first: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9DVYVfI81R8
Views: 256110 Jacob Clifford
Macro 4.11- Money Multiplier & Reserve Requirement (AP Macro)
 
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Mr. Clifford explains the reserve requirement, the money multiplier, and how money is created.
Views: 210560 Jacob Clifford
How Banks Create Money and the Money Multiplier- Macro 4.8
 
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Money doesn't grow on trees, but it does grow in banks. I explain how banks create money and how to use the money multiplier. For more practice go to my website www.ACDCecon.com or watch the unit playlist videos. Please subscribe and leave a comment. You rock! Monetary Policy and Despicable Me https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RaeIBeJT5hY Video about the Federal Reserve https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qXhXnwDANXo Unit playlists. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HQkVO2PsxFw
Views: 390827 Jacob Clifford
What is Monetary Policy?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Monetary Policy”. Monetary policy is one of the ways that a government attempts to control the economy. If the money supply grows too fast, the rate of inflation will increase; if the growth of the money supply is slowed too much, then economic growth may also slow. The actions of a central bank, currency board or other regulatory committee that determine the size and rate of growth of the money supply, which in turn affects interest rates. Monetary policy is maintained through actions such as increasing the interest rate, or changing the amount of money banks need to keep in the vault. The term used, is primarily used, in reference to the US Federal Reserve but has gained global recognition as central banks around the world reacted to the financial crisis and relied on actions by their specific banks to help the economic problems. The ECB has been in the headline over the last few years as Mr. Draghi adopted monetary policy to help support the faltering Eurozone economy. The regulation of the money supply and interest rates by a central bank, such as the Federal Reserve Board in the U.S., in order to control inflation and stabilize currency. Monetary policy is one the two ways the government can impact the economy. By impacting the effective cost of money, the Federal Reserve can affect the amount of money that is spent by consumers and businesses. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy
Y1/IB 31) Monetary Policy (Interest Rates, Money Supply and Exchange Rate)
 
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AS/IB 21) Monetary Policy (Interest Rates, Money Supply and Exchange Rate) - An understanding of how monetary policy works with reference to central bank inflation targeting as well. Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 98537 EconplusDal
Macro 4.1- Money Market and FED Tools (Monetary Policy)
 
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Mr. Clifford explains the supply and demand for money and the three tools that the FED uses to adjust the money supply
Views: 210557 Jacob Clifford
Currency Politics: The Political Economy of Exchange Rate Policy
 
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Recorded April 20, 2017 Jeffry Frieden, Harvard University Professor of Government, discusses the political economy of exchange rate policy. By Jeffry Frieden’s account, the exchange rate of a currency is the single most important price in any economy, yet is subject to political pressure and rarely set by solely economic considerations. Currency policy involves significant economic trade-offs that implicate powerful interests in society, but which set of interests predominates varies greatly across time and space. Drawing on examples like the gold standard in the nineteenth century, European monetary integration, and Latin American currency choice and crises, Frieden explains the development of monetary policy within the shifting global economic and political order. Learn more: http://cissr.uchicago.edu/events/170420-jeffry-frieden-on-currency-politics/ -- The University of Chicago Center for International Social Science Research is an eclectic intellectual community devoted to nourishing empirical international research across the social sciences. We seek to spark and sustain critical discussions that traverse disciplinary, methodological, and geographic boundaries. CISSR advances social science research that informs and transforms debates on global issues within the academy and beyond. http://cissr.uchicago.edu
Views: 1211 UChicagoCISSR
Pakistan's Economy slows down, Forex Reserves down to $9 bn
 
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Pakistan's economy has slowed down for the first time in six years and is expected to grow at around 5.2 per cent this year as against the original target of 6.2 per cent, a media report said Saturday. The government of Pakistan has listed fiscal squeeze and low outputs in agriculture and manufacturing sectors among the reasons for slowing down of the economy. In the last fiscal year, the economy grew at a pace of 5.8 per cent – the highest in 13 years. The government has lowered its all major macroeconomic targets and projected that the economy will slow down to around 5.2 per cent this year, 'The Express Tribune' reported. It emerged during a discussion with the International Monetary Fund (IMF) delegation on Thursday. IMF's Washington-based Mission Chief to Pakistan Harald Finger is leading a staff-level delegation, the report said. The team kick started its talks and also met with Finance Minister Asad Umar. The IMF team was informed that due to unleashing of tight fiscal and monetary policies, the economy will slow down in the current fiscal year, said the sources in the finance ministry. They said that Pakistani authorities have projected 5.2 per cent economic growth rate as against the original target of 6.2 per cent. "The IMF has not yet communicated its position on Pakistan's revised assessment of 5.2 per cent growth rate," they said. Pakistan shared its revised macroeconomic indicators with the IMF during the first day of the week-long talks. The government has projected current account deficit of around 4.9 per cent of Gross Domestic Product or nearly USD 14 billion. The staff-level visit could become a prelude to a formal programme talks, although Pakistan has so far been denying that it is seeking another bailout package from the IMF to deal with the external sector challenges, the report said. "But in case Pakistan formally seeks a fund programme, a further devaluation of the rupee and an increase in interest rates can become IMF's prior actions," sources in the finance ministry said. In its March 2018 report on Pakistan, the IMF projected the economic growth rate at 4.7 per cent for the current fiscal year when Pakistan was following expansionary fiscal policies. The slowing down of the economy – for the first time in six years – will have direct bearing on jobs creation and quality of lives, the report said. The 5.2 per cent downward projection is still higher than 4.8 per cent estimated by the Asian Development Bank (ADB) in its report this week. The agriculture sector is now expected to grow at around 3 per cent rate – as against the original target of 3.8 per cent. The industrial output has been projected close to 5.8 per cent against 7.6 per cent original target. "The services sector – that contributes nearly 60 per cent in the total national output – may also slowdown to nearly 5.7 per cent," the sources said. They said that due to devaluation of the rupee, increase in interest rates and imposition of new taxes, the government has also revised upward its inflation target to 6.5 per cent, which many believe is still lower, but is in line with the ADB assessment. The State Bank of Pakistan is expected to raise interest rates this week, as the Pakistani authorities have decided to contain the overall demand in the economy as part of its economic stabilisation policy. The last Monetary Policy Committee meeting that was held in July had also highlighted challenges to agriculture and manufacturing sectors. The industrial output was feared to be affected by depreciation of the rupee and factors like monetary policy tightening, according to the minutes of the committee. Finance Minister Umar is said to have informed the visiting IMF delegation that after introducing the fiscal measures last week, the government was working on a new structural reforms programme. He has informed the IMF that the government has imposed additional taxes in addition to increasing the gas prices by 143 per cent. Source :- ET Background Music :- bensound.com Disclaimer- This channel is for defence related news worldwide . We try to give you true news related to each and every aspects of defence . It is either country, defence weapon, air Force, army ,navy, military or anything we will try to fully explain . The content specially news we upload are taken from various news channels and media houses . we never claim it is 100 % on our behalf but we try to deliver you exact without rumours . our news is specially related to india . As India is a growing country specially in defence under narendra modi BJP government . Channel Link: https://www.youtube.com/DefenceTube Facebook Link: https://www.facebook.com/defencetube Twitter Link : https://twitter.com/DefenceTube Check my all playlist : https://www.youtube.com/defencetube/playlist
Views: 1664 Defence Tube
The Tools of Monetary Policy
 
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This video lesson graphically presents the three tools Central Banks have at their disposal for managing the level of aggregate demand in the economy. Through increasing or decreasing the money supply, a central bank has influence over the interest rates in a nation, and therefore over the level of investment and consumption among firms and households. To accomplish this, three tools are employed: The reserve requirement, the open market purchase or sale of government bonds, and the discount rate. This lesson illustrates these three tools and explains the relative importance of each to monetary policy makers.
Views: 175989 Jason Welker
#72, Foreign exchange rate (Class 12 macroeconomics)
 
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Class 12 macroeconomics ..... Foreign exchange rate.... Foreign exchange.... Types of foreign exchange rate ..... Depreciation and appreciation of currency.... Contact for my book 7690041256 Economics on your tips video 72
Views: 306105 Economics on your tips
How the Reserve Bank Implements Monetary Policy
 
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Watch Senior Analyst, Katherine Leong, talk about how the Reserve Bank implements monetary policy in this short lecture-style video.
Views: 3235 RBAinfo
Money supply: M0, M1, and M2 | The monetary system | Macroeconomics | Khan Academy
 
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Different ways of measuring the money supply Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/monetary-system-topic/factional-reserve-accounting/v/simple-fractional-reserve-accounting-part-1?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Missed the previous lesson? https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/macroeconomics/monetary-system-topic/fractional-reserve-banking-tut/v/full-reserve-banking?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=macroeconomics Macroeconomics on Khan Academy: Topics covered in a traditional college level introductory macroeconomics course About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy's Macroeconomics channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCBytY7pnP0GAHB3C8vDeXvg Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 327406 Khan Academy
Foreign Exchange Practice- Macro Practice- Macro 5.3
 
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In this video I explain foreign exchange and how the value of currencies change. Remember that the trick is to remember that you supply your currency and the people in other countries demand your currency. Thanks for watching.
Views: 197882 Jacob Clifford
Monetary and Fiscal Policy: Crash Course Government and Politics #48
 
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Today, Craig is going to dive into the controversy of monetary and fiscal policy. Monetary and fiscal policy are ways the government, and most notably the Federal Reserve, influences the economy - for better or for worse. So we’re going to start by looking at monetary policy, and specifically how the Federal Reserve uses interests rates as a means of controlling (or at least attempting to control) inflation. We’ll then move onto fiscal policy - that is the government’s use of taxation to raise and spend money. It’s all, well, pretty controversial, but as it seems Americans hate taxes the most, monetary policy is most often used - meaning that the Federal Reserve plays a hugely significant role in steering the U.S. economy. Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios Support is provided by Voqal: http://www.voqal.org All attributed images are licensed under Creative Commons by Attribution 4.0 https://creativecommons.org/licenses/... Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashC... Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 343390 CrashCourse
Keeley Sees Foreign Exchange Reserves Risk for China
 
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Sept. 16 (Bloomberg) -- Terry Keeley, senior managing principal of Sovereign Trends LLC, discusses the Bank of Japan's currency intervention and China's monetary policy. Keeley talks with Erik Schatzker on Bloomberg Television's "InsideTrack."
Views: 855 Bloomberg
Currency Appreciation & Depreciation - How it Affects the Economy | Economics
 
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In this video we will learn what is Rupee appreciation and depreciation. It is also referred to as currency devaluation and revaluation. You must have read it in the newspaper that rupee has become stronger or weaker or crashed or gained some points against the American dollar. All of this simply means that the value of rupee has either increased or decreased against the American Dollar. This topic is part of Macroeconomics. Currency Appreciation & Depreciation has a huge affect on a nation's economy. It drives Foreign Direct Investment FDI, increases foreign reserves and it also affects a country's import and export. Fill this feedback form for a better learning experience https://goo.gl/vrYPBw Click here if you want to subscribe https://www.youtube.com/user/TheRealSengupta Maps and sketches can be found on the instagram account search for "geographysimple"
Views: 18683 Amit Sengupta
The Money Multiplier
 
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When you deposit money into a bank, do you know what happens to it? It doesn’t simply sit there. Banks are actually allowed to loan out up to 90% of their deposits. For every $10 that you deposit, only $1 is required to stay put. This practice is known as fractional reserve banking. Now, it’s fairly rare for a bank to only have 10% in reserves, and the number fluctuates. Since checkable deposits are part of the U.S. money supplies, fractional reserve banking, as you might have guessed, can have a big impact on these supplies. This is where the money multiplier comes into play. The money multiplier itself is straightforward: it equals 1 divided by the reserve ratio. If reserves are at 10%, the minimum amount required by the Fed, then the money multiplier is 10. So if a bank has $1 million in checkable deposits, it has $10 million to work with for stuff like loans and reserves. Now, typically, the money multiplier is more like 3, because banks can always hold more in reserves than the minimum 10%. When the money multiplier is higher, like during a boom, this gives the Fed more leverage to move M1 and M2 with a small change in reserves. But when the multiplier is lower, such as during a recession, the Fed has less leverage and must push harder to wield its indirect influence over M1 and M2. Next up, we’ll take a closer look at how the Fed controls the money supply and how that has changed since the Great Recession. Subscribe for new videos every Tuesday! http://bit.ly/1Rib5V8 Macroeconomics Course: http://bit.ly/2eHWWtC Ask a question about the video: http://bit.ly/2utp1IH Next video: http://bit.ly/2udpA7U
Monetary Policy#1: Money multiplier, Fractional Reserve, High Powered v. Narrow v. Broad Money
 
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- So far in the budget and economic survey series 2017 (BES17): we've covered the evolution of money with special focus on digital payment in the light of de-monetization. - Now we shall move to monetary policy- tools, review of last one year's policies and its limitations. - But, first we must learn how can a Central Bank control money supply and liquidity in the system? - In his book the General theory of employment, interest and money, the famous Economist John Maynard Keynes listed the motives for which people demand and keep money in liquid form 1) transaction motive 2) precautionary motive and 3) speculative motive- also known as the asset demand of money. - We measure the money supply thus kept as "M1"- which is currency with public plus demand deposits in the banks. Because of the fractional reserve system, Every “R” reserve generates “1/r” new money - What is money multiplier, why is it said that in a functional economy, money multiplier is always greater than one? - What is M0: reserve money or high powered money? Why is it called liability of RBI? - Measures of money supply: M0, M1, M2, M3, M4. what is broad money and what is narrow money? Which one has the highest liquidity? - How can RBI combat inflation and deflation? What type of policy strategy should it use against these two scenarios? What is easy money policy, cheap money policy, dovish money policy vs. tight money policy, dear money policy, Hawkish money policy. - Faculty Name: You know who - all Powerpoint available at http://mrunal.org/powerpoint - Exam-Utility: UPSC IAS IPS Civil service exam, Prelims, CSAT, Mains, Staff selection SSC-CGL, IBPS-PO/MT, IBPS-CWE, SBI PO & Clerk, RBI and other banking exams; LIC, EPFO, FCI & other PSU exams; CDS, CAPF and other defense services exams; GPSC, MPPCS, RPSC & other State PCS services exams with Indian Economy, Budget, Banking, Public Finance in its syllabus- with descriptive questions and answer writing.
Views: 282007 Mrunal Patel
Currency Exchange Introduction
 
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Introduction to how exchange rates can fluctuate More free lessons at: http://www.khanacademy.org/video?v=itoNb1lb5hY
Views: 547001 Khan Academy
Money and Finance: Crash Course Economics #11
 
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So, we've been putting off a kind of basic question here. What is money? What is currency? How are the two different. Well, not to give away too much, but money has a few basic functions. It acts as a store of value, a medium of exchange, and as a unit of account. Money isn't just bills and coins. It can be anything that meets these three criteria. In US prisons, apparently, pouches of Mackerel are currency. Yes, mackerel the fish. Paper and coins work as money because they're backed by the government, which is an advantage over mackerel. So, once you've got money, you need finance. We'll talk about borrowing, lending, interest, and stocks and bonds. Also, this episode features a giant zucchini, which Adriene grew in her garden. So that's cool. Special thanks to Dave Hunt for permission to use his PiPhone video. this guy really did make an artisanal smartphone! https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8eaiNsFhtI8 Crash Course is on Patreon! You can support us directly by signing up at http://www.patreon.com/crashcourse Thanks to the following Patrons for their generous monthly contributions that help keep Crash Course free for everyone forever: Fatima Iqbal, Penelope Flagg, Eugenia Karlson, Alex S, Jirat, Tim Curwick, Christy Huddleston, Eric Kitchen, Moritz Schmidt, Today I Found Out, Avi Yashchin, Chris Peters, Eric Knight, Jacob Ash, Simun Niclasen, Jan Schmid, Elliot Beter, Sandra Aft, SR Foxley, Ian Dundore, Daniel Baulig, Jason A Saslow, Robert Kunz, Jessica Wode, Steve Marshall, Anna-Ester Volozh, Christian, Caleb Weeks, Jeffrey Thompson, James Craver, and Markus Persson -- Want to find Crash Course elsewhere on the internet? Facebook - http://www.facebook.com/YouTubeCrashCourse Twitter - http://www.twitter.com/TheCrashCourse Tumblr - http://thecrashcourse.tumblr.com Support Crash Course on Patreon: http://patreon.com/crashcourse CC Kids: http://www.youtube.com/crashcoursekids
Views: 654570 CrashCourse
ASTROFX - The Monetary System and The Federal Reserve explained
 
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In this video we decided to tackle a crucial topic, which many individuals find difficult to grasp: The Monetary System & The Federal Reserve. It's insane that the majority of the population are unaware of how money in the world is issued and why interest rates go up or down. In any economy these important factors change the price of your living, your spending and even the house that you live in now!
Views: 10377 Astro Forex
Banking Awareness for Bank PO: Basics of Foreign Exchange [IBPS/SBI PO, Bank PO, RBI Grade B]
 
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You can watch the entire course here:- https://goo.gl/XW81qx | Also, you can watch it on Unacademy Learning App on Android. Download it here:- https://goo.gl/yWRpfy A veteran banker with over 20 years of experience, Vinay Agarwal, takes you through all the must-know facts about foreign exchange in India. A must-watch lesson for all banking aspirants, especially for IBPS/SBI PO aspirants. For more lessons/courses on Banking Exam Preparation, please visit:- https://unacademy.com/banking-examination-ibps-sbi/. Don't forget to "pin" the topic so that you receive all the latest updates from this topic.
Views: 9574 Unacademy
18. Monetary Policy
 
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Financial Markets (2011) (ECON 252) To begin the lecture, Professor Shiller explores the origins of central banking, from the goldsmith bankers in the United Kingdom to the founding of the Bank of England in 1694, which was a private institution that created stability in the U.K. financial system by requiring other banks to have deposits in it. Turning his attention to the U.S., Professor Shiller outlines the evolution of its banking system from the Suffolk System, via the National Banking era, to the founding of the Federal Reserve System in 1913. After presenting approaches to central banking in the European Union and in Japan, he emphasizes the federal funds rate, targeted by the Federal Open Market Committee, as well as the recent change to pay interest on reserve balances at the Federal Reserve, enacted by the Emergency Economic Stabilization Act from 2008, as important tools of U.S. monetary policy. After elaborating on reserve requirements, which are liability-based restrictions, and capital requirements, which are asset-based, he provides a simple, illustrative example that delivers an important intuition about the difficulties that banks have faced during the recent crisis from 2007-2008. This leads to Professor Shiller's concluding remarks about regulatory approaches to the prevention of future banking crises. 00:00 - Chapter 1. The Origins of Central Banking: The Bank of England 06:27 - Chapter 2. The Suffolk System and the National Banking Era in the U.S. 12:08 - Chapter 3. The Founding of the Federal Reserve System 25:46 - Chapter 4. The Move to Make Central Banks Independent 30:49 - Chapter 5. U.S. Monetary Policy: Federal Funds Rate and Reserve Requirements 45:23 - Chapter 6. Capital Requirements, Basel III and Rating Agencies 52:34 - Chapter 7. Capital Requirements and Reserve Requirements in the Context of a Simple Example 01:05:30 - Chapter 8. Capital Requirements to Stabilize the Financial System in Crisis Times Complete course materials are available at the Yale Online website: online.yale.edu This course was recorded in Spring 2011.
Views: 94617 YaleCourses
TOP 10 IN AFRICA_ FOREIGN EXCHANGE RESERVES  IMF _ 2015 -17
 
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Foreign exchange reserves are reserve assets held by a central bank in foreign currencies, used to back liabilities on their own issued currency as well as to influence monetary policy.
How Does China Manipulate Its Currency?
 
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» Subscribe to NowThis World: http://go.nowth.is/World_Subscribe With about $400 billion in debt and a broken economy, Greece is in trouble. But, how did Greece end up with such a high debt, and who do they owe money to? Learn More: Greece's Debt Due: What Greece Owes When http://graphics.wsj.com/greece-debt-timeline/ "Greece is negotiating with its eurozone creditors to get more aid before the indebted government runs out of cash." Explaining the Greek Debt Crisis http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/09/business/international/explaining-the-greek-debt-crisis.html "Greece, the weak link in the eurozone, is struggling to pay its debt as its people and its creditors grow more restive." Greek debts: what does it owe? When will the money run out? http://www.theguardian.com/business/2015/apr/24/greek-debts-what-does-it-owe-when-will-the-money-run-out "Crunch talks between Greece and its eurozone creditors are under way, but investors are growing increasingly sceptical that the country can reach an agreement on reforms and unlock the aid it needs from international lenders to avoid a debt default." Greek debt crisis: Who has most to lose? http://money.cnn.com/2015/01/28/investing/greek-debt-who-has-most-to-lose/ "Greece and its international lenders have embarked on a battle over the country's staggering debt." Watch More: What Happens If A Country Goes Bankrupt? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3PZDLG-rtGs&list=UUgRvm1yLFoaQKhmaTqXk9SA _________________________ NowThis World is dedicated to bringing you topical explainers about the world around you. Each week we’ll be exploring current stories in international news, by examining the facts, providing historical context, and outlining the key players involved. We’ll also highlight powerful countries, ideologies, influential leaders, and ongoing global conflicts that are shaping the current landscape of the international community across the globe today. More from NowThis: » Subscribe to NowThis News: http://go.nowth.is/News_Subscribe » Like NowThis World on Facebook: https://go.nowth.is/World_Facebook » Connect with Judah: Follow @judah_robinson on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeJudah » Connect with Versha: Follow @versharma on Twitter – Facebook: http://go.nowth.is/LikeVersha http://www.youtube.com/nowthisworld Special thanks to Lissette Padilla for hosting TestTube! Check Lissette out on Twitter:https://twitter.com/lizzette
Views: 276284 NowThis World
Understanding How the Federal Reserve Works - Documentary Films
 
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CLICK HERE - http://activeterium.com/1DCR - FOR MORE FREE DOCUMENTARIES Understanding How the Federal Reserve Works - Documentary Films For over a century, the privately owned and operated Federal Reserve Banking system has controlled this nation's money supply and credit. This institution and its economic policies are an enigma to most government officials and American citizens. To understand the Federal Reserve Bank, we have to first look at how it operates. We can then understand why our founding fathers were opposed to such a system for the United States of America. The Federal Reserve is what is known as a central bank. This bank is not regulated by the United States government. It creates the nation's money supply, loans it back to the government at interest, and regulates interest rates on the money it loaned out. However, the Federal Reserve, also commonly called "the Fed," does not loan out money held in its vaults. Instead, it creates new money for circulation by adding credits to an account. Thus, they are creating new money that never existed before. How much money can be created out of nothing? The Fed is only required to hold ten percent in reserves, and can loan out ninety percent. One of the Federal Reserve's publications states, "Of course, they (the banks) do not really pay out loans from the money received from deposits. What they do when they make loans is to accept promissory notes (money) for credits to the borrowers account." Actual currency is relative to the amount of new loans in demand. In short our system is based on debt. New money cannot be created unless banks issue new loans. The Federal Reserve is a private bank. It loans America it's currency at interest like any other bank, and process works like this. The federal government needs to make more money. It has the Federal Reserve print reserve notes (money) worth a set value. The federal government then prints treasury bonds, which is basically a promissory note to pay back the loan of the currency at interest. In simple terms our government is in debt to the Federal Reserve as soon as the money is created. If the government is in debt to the Fed, who makes the money, and the only way to get out debt is make more money, and the people who make the money are charging interest; how would the debt ever be paid off? It doesn't. As stated by the great scientist and creator of the light bulb, Thomas Edison wrote, "If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill. The element that makes the bond good, makes the bill good, also. The difference between the bond and the bill is that the bond lets money brokers collect twice the amount of the bond and an additional 20%, whereas the currency pays nobody but those who contribute directly in some useful way. It is absurd to say that our country can issue $30 million in bonds and not $30 million in currency. Both are promises to pay, but one promise fattens the usurers and the other helps the people." Understanding How the Federal Reserve Works - Documentary Films
Views: 24674 Documentary Films
FOREIGN EXCHANGE RESERVE | basic in tamil
 
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Plz subscribe for more info Like - share - comment your views
Views: 3144 banking info at tamil
BoP#2: Capital Account- Sterilization, FIPB Abolition, FCNR Swap Crisis, Demonetization Impact
 
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- RBI's sterilization operations. - Impact of demonetization on Rupee exchange rate - Currency swap and FCNR swap. - difference between foreign direct investment (FDI) and foreign portfolio investment (FPI) - What is composite cap in foreign investment? - Foreign investment limits for various category of businesses - e-commerce companies of India: marketplace model and inventory based companies- meaning and provisions for foreign investment limits. - Trends in foreign domestic investment flows in India last 15 years:source-country wise, sector-wise and state -wise - Recent trends in FDI and FPI inflows. - Budget 2017: decision to abolish FIPB. - Total Balance of Payment, how it changes RBI’s foreign exchange reserves? - Exchange rate regimes, forex reserve, yuan undervaluation, currency manipulation - Capital account convertibility and current account convertibility. - Faculty Name: You know who - All Powerpoint available at http://mrunal.org/powerpoint - Exam-Utility: UPSC IAS IPS Civil service exam, Prelims, CSAT, Mains, Staff selection SSC-CGL, IBPS-PO/MT, IBPS-CWE, SBI PO & Clerk, RBI and other banking exams; LIC, EPFO, FCI & other PSU exams; CDS, CAPF and other defense services exams; GPSC, MPPCS, RPSC & other State PCS services exams with Indian Economy, Budget, Banking, Public Finance in its syllabus- with descriptive questions and answer writing.
Views: 88780 Mrunal Patel
How Does Monetary Policy Affect the U.S. Economy? Ben Bernanke & Elizabeth Warren (2013)
 
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Monetary policy, to a great extent, is the management of expectations. Monetary policy rests on the relationship between the rates of interest in an economy, that is, the price at which money can be borrowed, and the total supply of money. Monetary policy uses a variety of tools to control one or both of these, to influence outcomes like economic growth, inflation, exchange rates with other currencies and unemployment. Where currency is under a monopoly of issuance, or where there is a regulated system of issuing currency through banks which are tied to a central bank, the monetary authority has the ability to alter the money supply and thus influence the interest rate (to achieve policy goals). The beginning of monetary policy as such comes from the late 19th century, where it was used to maintain the gold standard. A policy is referred to as contractionary if it reduces the size of the money supply or increases it only slowly, or if it raises the interest rate. An expansionary policy increases the size of the money supply more rapidly, or decreases the interest rate. Furthermore, monetary policies are described as follows: accommodative, if the interest rate set by the central monetary authority is intended to create economic growth; neutral, if it is intended neither to create growth nor combat inflation; or tight if intended to reduce inflation. There are several monetary policy tools available to achieve these ends: increasing interest rates by fiat; reducing the monetary base; and increasing reserve requirements. All have the effect of contracting the money supply; and, if reversed, expand the money supply. Since the 1970s, monetary policy has generally been formed separately from fiscal policy. Even prior to the 1970s, the Bretton Woods system still ensured that most nations would form the two policies separately. Within almost all modern nations, special institutions (such as the Federal Reserve System in the United States, the Bank of England, the European Central Bank, the People's Bank of China, the Reserve Bank of New Zealand, and the Bank of Japan) exist which have the task of executing the monetary policy and often independently of the executive. In general, these institutions are called central banks and often have other responsibilities such as supervising the smooth operation of the financial system. The primary tool of monetary policy is open market operations. This entails managing the quantity of money in circulation through the buying and selling of various financial instruments, such as treasury bills, company bonds, or foreign currencies. All of these purchases or sales result in more or less base currency entering or leaving market circulation. Usually, the short term goal of open market operations is to achieve a specific short term interest rate target. In other instances, monetary policy might instead entail the targeting of a specific exchange rate relative to some foreign currency or else relative to gold. For example, in the case of the USA the Federal Reserve targets the federal funds rate, the rate at which member banks lend to one another overnight; however, the monetary policy of China is to target the exchange rate between the Chinese renminbi and a basket of foreign currencies. The other primary means of conducting monetary policy include: (i) Discount window lending (lender of last resort); (ii) Fractional deposit lending (changes in the reserve requirement); (iii) Moral suasion (cajoling certain market players to achieve specified outcomes); (iv) "Open Mouth Operations" (talking monetary policy with the market). http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Monetary_policy
Views: 2959 The Film Archives
Foreign Exchange Reserve Account Lesson.01
 
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Foreign Exchange Reserve Account Lesson.01 Lecture by Syed Ali Abbas Abidi, GRADSY Institute of Pakistan
Views: 1405 Noor Habib
What Does a Central Bank Do?
 
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A central bank oversees a nation’s monetary system. With their ability to dictate the direction of an economy, central banks play a pivotal role in a country’s growth. In most cases, they are not a government agency, even though they serve their nation. Their responsibilities range widely, depending on their country. Central banks control monetary policy, which means they manipulate liquidity in the financial system to influence the economy. Their actions will determine currency stability, as well as the levels of inflation and employment. They also regulate banks, and provide services for a nation’s banks and its government. To control monetary policy, central banks issue currency and set interest rates on loans and bonds. Central banks raise interest rates to slow growth and avoid inflation. They’ll lower rates to spur growth. By establishing a reserve requirement, central banks dictate how much banks can loan to customers, and how much capital they must keep on hand. And when providing banking services for other banks and the government, central banks loan money to members and oversee their activity. They also manage foreign exchange reserves. In the United States, the central banking system is known as the Federal Reserve, commonly called the Fed. It includes 12 regional Federal Reserve Banks that are located throughout the country. It regulates banks, and it buys and sells Treasury bonds to set monetary policy and steer interest rates. Read more: http://www.investopedia.com/video/play/central-bank/ Copyright © Investopedia.com
Views: 17391 Xargo
How Exchange Rates Work
 
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● We explain topics simply. So Subscribe if you want to learn while being entertained. ✔ Please like the video and comment if you enjoyed - it helps a lot! ▶ If you want a question answered then ask in the comments and we may make a video about it! About the video: You may have traveled a lot and wondered why you get more of one currency when you exchange it for another. If so, you have witnessed exchange rates in action, but do you know how they work? Watch the video to find out what exchange rates are, how to convert between them and the different systems which determine a currencies exchange rate. Historically the gold standard system had been used, which fixed currency to a select value of gold, held in a vault. The three main systems are the floating, managed and fixed exchange rate systems. The floating system has minimal government intervention, using supply and demand to determine the exchange rate. The managed exchange rate is allowed to be within a permitted band and a fixed exchange rate is usually pegged to a currency with the interest of being competitive in the international market. The video explains this in more detail and with helpful picture to guide you through the subject.
Views: 302162 SimplyExplain
The Gold Standard: How Does it Work? Do We Need It?
 
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The Gold Standard: How Does it Work? Do We Need It? 🌟SPECIAL OFFERS: ► Free 30 day Audible Trial & Get 2 Free Audiobooks: https://amzn.to/2Iu08SE ...OR: 🌟 try Audiobooks.com 🎧for FREE! : http://affiliates.audiobooks.com/tracking/scripts/click.php?a_aid=5b8c26085f4b8 The gold standard is a monetary system in which the standard economic unit of account is a fixed weight of gold. There are distinct kinds of gold standard. First, the gold specie standard is a system in which the monetary unit is associated with circulating gold coins, or with the unit of value defined in terms of one particular circulating gold coin in conjunction with subsidiary coinage made from a less valuable metal. Similarly, the gold exchange standard typically does not involve the circulation of gold coins, instead using notes or coins made of silver or other metals, but where the authorities guarantee a fixed exchange rate with another country that is on the gold standard. This creates a de facto gold standard, in that the value of the silver coins has a fixed external value in terms of gold that is independent of the inherent silver value. Finally, the gold bullion standard is a system in which gold coins do not circulate, but in which the authorities have agreed to sell gold bullion on demand at a fixed price in exchange for the circulating currency. No country currently uses the gold standard as the basis of its monetary system, although several hold substantial gold reserves. (from Wikipedia) There are strong arguments for and against the gold standard. Others say that neither the Federal Reserve OR the gold standard should exist, and that instead, the U.S. Treasury itself should control the currency supply by issuing a Greenback currency (rather than the PRIVATE Federal Reserve Bank). This position's case has been well made in the documentary film "The Secret of Oz" by Bill Still. Watch "The Secret of Oz" for free on Bill Still's channel: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swkq2E8mswI&feature=plcp SUBSCRIBE to Bright Enlightenment: http://www.youtube.com/BrightEnlightenment Join the club: http://www.facebook.com/BrightEnlightenment What do you think? Federal Reserve? Gold Standard? U.S. Treasury Greenbacks? Leave a comments, thoughts, and opinions in the comments!
Views: 104207 Bright Enlightenment
Digital currencies: Implications for central banks
 
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On April 17 from 2 to 3:30 pm at the Hutchins Center on Fiscal & Monetary Policy at Brookings, Eswar Prasad, Senior Fellow in the Global Economy at Brookings and professor at Cornell University, discussed a framework for thinking through these issues and reviewed how different central banks are responding to the changes and challenges they face. https://www.brookings.edu/events/digital-currencies-implications-for-central-banks/ (transcript available) Subscribe! http://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=BrookingsInstitution Follow Brookings on social media! Facebook: http://www.Facebook.com/Brookings Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/BrookingsInst Instagram: http://www.Instagram.com/brookingsinst LinkedIn: http://www.linkedin.com/com/company/the-brookings-institution
Views: 1772 Brookings Institution
Exchange Rate System | External Sector | Indian Economy | ECONOMY GURU | NEO IAS
 
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INDIAN ECONOMY FOR PRELIMS IN 100 HOURS Video Link : https://youtu.be/NQgMFNCmwkA HOW TO PREPARE INDIAN ECONOMY FOR UPSC CSE PRELIMS 2018? https://youtu.be/A-acqr7u74A BITS ECONOMY Video Link : https://youtu.be/tJkAiJNtvF0 Economy Prelims Telegram Channel - https://goo.gl/DAo5zp To Know more about Economy Guru : https://goo.gl/zwrHiE Exchange Rate System of Indian Economy for CIVIL SERVICES EXAMINATION explained in the simplest way. NEO IAS e-learning classes is an online program which aims to create CIVIL SERVANTS for the development of the nation by providing the video series of complete topics that are relevant for the CIVIL SERVICES (IAS/IPS) Exam.
Economic Data - Forex Reserve : TAMIL
 
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Economic Data - Forex Reserve : TAMIL For further to register as member : http://app.aliceblueonline.com/OpenAccount.aspx?c=CTA Twitter : https://twitter.com/chennaittradin1 Facebook : https://www.facebook.com/chennaitradingacademy/ LinkedIn : https://www.linkedin.com/in/chennai-trading-academy-cta-b0571b165/
Fiscal & Monetary Policy Review- AP Macroeconomics
 
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In this video I overview fiscal and monetary policy and how the economy adjust in the long run. Keep in mind that fiscal and monetary policy shift aggregate demand while waiting for the economy to adjust is a shift in aggregate supply. Thanks for watching. Please subscribe. If you need more help, check out my Ultimate Review Packet http://www.acdcecon.com/#!review-packet/czji Macroeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XnFv3d8qllI Microeconomics Videos https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=swnoF533C_c Watch Econmovies https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL1oDmcs0xTD9Aig5cP8_R1gzq-mQHgcAH Follow me on Twitter https://twitter.com/acdcleadership
Views: 470106 Jacob Clifford
দেশের গড় মূল্যস্ফীতির বৃদ্ধি, কমেছে বৈদেশিক মুদ্রার মজুদ
 
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In the last six months, the country's average inflation has increased, the deficit has increased, the balance of the current accounting and the decrease of foreign exchange reserves. So, the central bank advised the central bank to adjust these issues in the next monetary policy, economists said. According to them, the monetary policy will reduce the debt and the ratio of deposits of banks. Traders, on the other hand, said that adequate private investment is needed to achieve high growth, monetary policy should be made more liberal and easier. In the end of July, the Central Bank announced declaration of the first fiscal year of the fiscal year with a growth of 16 percent and 2 percent in private sector and 12.1 percent growth in the public sector. Though the government did not take the loan from the bank account, the private sector's loan growth exceeded 19 percent. In the beginning of the year, many banks have also seen interest rates to attract deposits. Last year, the average inflation rate has increased by 0.5 percent to 5.93 percent from the previous three months. So, in the upcoming Monetary Policy, these issues should be taken into consideration, said Executive Director of Policy Research Institute (PRI) Dr. Ahsan H Mansur Ahsan H Mansur said, 'On one side we have increased inflation. This has been a major deficit in the balance of payment that has been made. Our deficit is going down due to our deficit. These three things will now be adjusted through monetary policy. The big problem is that deposit growth is only 11 to 12 percent and credit expense is 19 percent. These two have become a lot of gaps and it's not Sustainable. As a result, credit-to-deposit ratio has gone up to 90 percent. They should be brought to a moderate level. ' According to various media outlets, the monetary policy can reduce the proportion of debt and deposits in this monetary policy. Islami Bank can now pay Tk 90 for a 100 taka deposit and General Commercial Bank 85 taka. Which can be reduced to 85 and 80 rupees respectively. The ability of banks to reduce their credit limit. Asif Ibrahim, former president of Dhaka Chamber of Commerce and Industry (DCCI) said, "Since we are now in the up-front GDP trends, we want it to grow further. Need sufficient private investment to achieve high growth, monetary policy should be made more liberal and easier. In the last six months, the amount of imports increased by about 90 percent, on the other hand, the rate of remittance inflow of expatriates has decreased. So the central bank's foreign exchange reserve has decreased at the end of the year. Content Rights & credit: ==================== It's our Own Content, Produce by "SOMOY TV (SOMOY Media Limited)". SOMOY TV is the 24/7 News Based TV Channel Where we makes all the news contents and program materials with the own team or employees. Somoy TV has the sole rights of all contents and it does not give permission to any business entity or individual to use these contents except ‍SOMOY TV (SOMOY Media Limited). Disclaimer: ============= This Channel is the Based on News and Current Affairs. The uploaded all contents are Made by our own team. Also Sometimes We are using some Third-Party materials where we have the specific authorization and permission to use this on YouTube. Also We published Some copyrighted materials without specific authorization of the owner but contents used here falls under the “Fair Use” Copyright Disclaimer under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for "fair use" for purposes such as criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research. Fair use is a use permitted by copyright statute that might otherwise be infringing. Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use. Stay Connected with us: ==================== "SOMOY TV (Somoy Media Limited)" is the Leading 24/7 News Based TV Channel in Bangladesh. Website: http://www.somoynews.tv Google Plus: https://plus.google.com/+somoytvnetupdate YouTube: http://www.youtube.com/somoytvnetupdate Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/somoynews.tv Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/somoytv
Views: 152 SOMOY TV
Bitcoin Q&A: Divisibility and deflationary monetary policy
 
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Paris Merkle Conference Keywords/phrases: Bitcoin's monetary policy is simulated to resemble precious metals, restricted supply without fractional reserve. 21 million is the maximum number of coins that will ever be created. Bitcoin is not a traditional currency, it is programmable money subdivided by 8 decimal points., or one-hundred million smaller units (satoshis) in every bitcoin. That could fit the world economy. Where supply is restricted, inflation is a problem, deflation is not. "Deflation" is a scary term for economists who now deal with currencies that are fractional reserve; deflation only occurs through the government, which has the authority to create an infinite supply, recession and depression. Therefore you only see it in places where there's catastrophic collapse in demand. In a market where you have deflation that is caused by improvements in efficiency, you get falling prices / cheaper goods. In a world where every other currency is printed to infinity, Bitcoin is interesting because it isn't.
Views: 6293 aantonop
Pakistan's Forex Reserves dive to $7.4 Billion   Pakis are desperate for AID
 
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Foreign exchange reserves held by the central bank continued to spiral downwards for the 12th successive week as they fell 2.55% on a weekly basis, according to data released on Thursday. The continued drop in the reserves is alarming as it raises concern about Pakistan’s ability to meet its financing requirements because the reserves have fallen below the $7.5-billion mark. Although the Saudi government has recently assured Pakistan that the promised $3-billion financial assistance will be released in coming days, the impact is yet to be seen. On the other hand, Chinese Embassy Deputy Head of Mission Zhao Lijian has also assured Pakistan of a financial package to boost its flagging foreign currency reserves, hinting that it would be bigger than that pledged by Saudi Arabia in terms of financial grant. Meanwhile, talks between the International Monetary Fund (IMF) and the finance ministry are going on for a possible bailout to help address Pakistan’s economic challenges. On November 9, the foreign currency reserves held by the State Bank of Pakistan (SBP) were recorded at $7,482.9 million, down $196 million compared with $7,678.9 million in the previous week. The decrease was attributed to external debt servicing and other official payments. Overall, liquid foreign currency reserves held by the country, including net reserves held by banks other than the SBP, stood at $13,832 million. Net reserves held by banks amounted to $6,349.1 million. A month ago, China agreed to immediately give a loan of $2 billion to Pakistan, a move meant to arrest the slide in foreign currency reserves and provide much-needed breathing space for the new government. Earlier, the reserves dipped to $9.06 billion, forcing the central bank to let the rupee depreciate massively for the fourth time since December 2017 and sparking concern about the country’s ability to finance a hefty import bill as well as meet debt obligations in coming months. In April, the SBP’s reserves increased $593 million due to official inflows. A few months ago, the reserves surged due to official inflows including $622 million from the Asian Development Bank (ADB) and $106 million from the World Bank. The SBP also received $350 million under the Coalition Support Fund (CSF) earlier. In January, the SBP made a $500-million loan repayment to the State Administration of Foreign Exchange (SAFE), China. Source :- Tribune.com.PK Disclaimer- This channel is for defence related news worldwide . We try to give you true news related to each and every aspects of defence . It is either country, defence weapon, air Force, army ,navy, military or anything we will try to fully explain . The content specially news we upload are taken from various news channels and media houses . we never claim it is 100 % on our behalf but we try to deliver you exact without rumours . our news is specially related to india . As India is a growing country specially in defence under narendra modi BJP government . Channel Link: https://www.youtube.com/DefenceTube Facebook Link: https://www.facebook.com/defencetube Twitter Link : https://twitter.com/DefenceTube Check my all playlist : https://www.youtube.com/defencetube/playlist
Views: 1910 Defence Tube
Hayek on Milton Friedman and Monetary Policy
 
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Friedrich Hayek discusses Milton Friedman's Monetarism and monetary policy. For more on Hayek's ideas on monetary policy see Choice in Currency: A way to stop inflation (for a concise summary) at http://www.iea.org.uk/publications/research/choice-in-currency-a-way-to-stop-inflation or see The Denationalisation of Money for a more a more detailed proposal at http://www.iea.org.uk/sites/default/files/publications/files/upldbook431pdf.pdf This is an excerpt from a longer interview which can be found here http://www.vimeo.com/4063439
Views: 170899 Malthus0
Episode 72: Reserve Requirements
 
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Go Premium for only $9.99 a year and access exclusive ad-free videos from Alanis Business Academy. Click here for a 14 day free trial: http://bit.ly/1Iervwb To view additional video lectures as well as other materials access the following links: YouTube Channel: http://bit.ly/1kkvZoO Website: http://bit.ly/1ccT2QA Facebook: http://on.fb.me/1cpuBhW Twitter: http://bit.ly/1bY2WFA Google+: http://bit.ly/1kX7s6P SoundCloud: http://bit.ly/1hNcJ2k Reserve requirements--also referred to as a reserve ratio--is a tool used by the Federal Reserve to control the supply of money. Although reserve requirements haven't been changed for quite some time, they still represent a primary method by which the Fed manages monetary policy.
Foreign Exchange Reserves : International Economics Homework Help by Classof1.com
 
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Get help with your International Economics assignment at http://classof1.com/homework-help/international-economics-homework-help/ Foreign Exchange Reserves: Foreign exchange reserves are generally the reserves or the assets that are usually held by the banks or any other central monetary authority of a country in a foreign currency. Some of the most commonly used foreign currencies in which the banks maintain their foreign reserves include US dollar, euro, pound and yen
Views: 1096 classof1homeworkhelp
Global Spillovers: Managing Capital Flows & Forex Reserves by Dr. Viral Acharya, RBI
 
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A keynote address by Dr. Viral Acharya, Deputy Governor, RBI at NSE-NYU Conference on Indian Financial Markets on Dec 14, 2017

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