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Relationship between bond prices and interest rates | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why bond prices move inversely to changes in interest rate. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/treasury-bond-prices-and-yields?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 494270 Khan Academy
Treasury bond prices and yields | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Why yields go down when prices go up. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/annual-interest-varying-with-debt-maturity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 235192 Khan Academy
The Effect of Interest Rates on The Treasury Yield
 
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Let us help you become the smartest investor in the room. Sign up by clicking the link below and get our 100% free E-book now: http://www.fearlesswealth.com/a-better-choice-yt/ Don't Miss Weekly Updates from RC! Click Here to Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCpeNTBaLA3xmrKSl7f0tWTA ===================================== It is Independence Day this week and I wanted to talk about how a lot of what independence is about is thinking for yourself, point out things you know that are not right. Sometimes this means you have to be on your own or at least with a small group that is going up against something large. And if you’ve been following me, you know that I’m a firm believe that the long only Big Box approach worked great in the 80’s and 90’s, but just hasn’t been working since 1999. Below you will find seven charts of different treasury yields. Each chart goes back to 1982. In each chart there will be a red dot – where the stock market peaked in 2000 and 2007. And a green dot – where the stock market bottomed after those two recessions. You’ll notice some interesting similarities in all of the 7 treasury yields charts. Also the Fed has less and less control over treasury yields the further and further out you go. So in our examples below the Fed has the most control over the 3 month yield and the least over the 30 year yield. The first chart below is of the 3 month treasury yield. You can see when the peak in yields happens in the early 1980s. Remember that The Feds are the ones that control this yield. The red dots are when the stock market peaked in 2000 and 2007. Notice how much yields fell during those times. In the 2000 Dot Com recession yields full from around 6% to eventually 1%. Similarly in the 2008 recession yields fell from about 5% all the way to 0%. In both recessions the yields fell 5%. So what do you think will happen to this yield when we have our next recession? If we have a recession right now and the Fed drops the yield 5% we’d have a -4% yield on the 3 month treasury. The next chart below is the 6 month treasury yield. You probably notice right away that the two charts look very similar. During each recession shown on the chart the yields drop about 5%. The biggest difference between the two charts are when rates started rising. You can see that the 6 month treasury yield began rising about two years before the 3 month yield. This is because the Fed has less of a reach on the 6 month yield. The point of showing you these charts is that the yield has a lot higher to go before we get into the next recession. It also can show you how absurd the behavior of the Fed has been considering the flatness of the line. This next price chart is of the 1 year treasury yield. Again you can see that the yield peaked right around the same time that the stock market peaked. But right after the stock market bottomed in 2002 the 1 year yield still continued to fall right after. You can see the similarities between the three charts. After each recession the yields dropped about 5%. Notice how steep this yield increases when the stock market goes up. Something that people forget is that yields historically move in the direction that stocks do. The next chart is the 2 year treasury. Again very similar. When the Dot Com recession happened the yield fell 6% and then during the 2008 Global Financial Crisis 5%. As you move further out on the yield curve the Fed has less control over it. This is interesting because after the yield bottomed in 2011, it has been steadily increasing on its own. The Fed didn’t start raising interest rates until December 2015. But the two year treasury which is controlled more by the public and the market, started moving up way before the Fed started moving their interest rates up.
Views: 1189 Fearless Wealth
How Interest Rates Are Set: The Fed's New Tools Explained
 
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The Federal Reserve has kept interest rates at near zero since the 2008 financial crisis. To raise them, it has come up with a new set of tools. A WSJ explainer. Subscribe to the WSJ channel here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Follow WSJ on Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/wsjvideo Follow WSJ on Google+: https://plus.google.com/+wsj/posts Follow WSJ on Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJvideo Follow WSJ on Instagram: http://instagram.com/wsj Follow WSJ on Pinterest: http://www.pinterest.com/wsj/ Don’t miss a WSJ video, subscribe here: http://bit.ly/14Q81Xy More from the Wall Street Journal: Visit WSJ.com: http://www.wsj.com Visit the WSJ Video Center: https://wsj.com/video On Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/pg/wsj/videos/ On Twitter: https://twitter.com/WSJ On Snapchat: https://on.wsj.com/2ratjSM
Views: 163906 Wall Street Journal
Price of treasury bill and interest rate
 
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In this video clip I explain the relationship between the price of a treasury bill and the interest.
Views: 22111 lostmy1
Explaining Bond Prices and Bond Yields
 
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​In this revision video we work through some numerical examples of the inverse relationship between the market price of fixed-interest government bonds and the yields on those bonds. ​Government bonds are fixed interest securities. This means that a bond pays a fixed annual interest – this is known as the coupon The coupon (paid in £s, $s, Euros etc.) is fixed but the yield on a bond will vary The yield is effectively the interest rate on a bond. The yield will vary inversely with the market price of a bond 1.When bond prices are rising, the yield will fall 2.When bond prices are falling, the yield will rise - - - - - - - - - MORE ABOUT TUTOR2U ECONOMICS: Visit tutor2u Economics for thousands of free study notes, videos, quizzes and more: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics A Level Economics Revision Flashcards: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/alevel-economics-revision-flashcards A Level Economics Example Top Grade Essays: https://www.tutor2u.net/economics/store/selections/exemplar-essays-for-a-level-economics
Views: 36787 tutor2u
Relationship between Bond Price & Interest Rate
 
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This video will help you understand the relationship between interest rate and the value of a bond. This video will clear your logic for why is it negative for the bond market when interest rate rises. Why is there an inverse relationship Interest Rate & Bond Price. Please leave us a comment/suggestion on our video and do hit "LIKE" if you like the video. SUBSCRIBE TO OUR CHANNEL FOR FULL ACCESS TO ALL OUR VIDEOS ABOUT US: Ambition Learning Solutions is a preemptive training institute providing trainings to undergraduates, post graduates and working professionals on various international certification programs like Certified Financial Planner (CFP), Certified Credit Research Analyst (CCRA), Basics of Financial Markets, Macro Economic Indicators impacting the Financial Markets, Derivatives Market, Technical Analysis, Credit Research, Commercial Banking, Investment Banking, Financial Modeling, Advance Excel, Equity Research, Diploma in Banking and Finance (DBF), NSE's Certified Capital Market Professional (NCCMP) etc. We assist corporate by providing qualified human resources for their operation and expansion requirement. We train their existing staff to furnish them with the latest updates and techniques in their respective domains. Reach us at: Website: www.ambitionlearning.com Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/groups/ambitionlearning/ Email: [email protected] Linkedin: http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=67196015&trk=wvmp-profile
How Interest Rates Affect the Market
 
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Investors should observe the Federal Reserve’s funds rate, which is the cost banks pay to borrow from Federal Reserve banks. What's going on with Japan's interest rates? Read here: http://www.investopedia.com/articles/investing/012916/bank-japan-announces-negative-interest-rates.asp?utm_source=youtube&utm_medium=social&utm_campaign=youtube_desc_link
Views: 72876 Investopedia
Introduction to the yield curve | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Introduction to the treasury yield curve. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/relationship-between-bond-prices-and-interest-rates?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-bonds?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 347553 Khan Academy
Bonds and Bond Yields
 
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Bonds and Bond Yields. A video covering Bonds and Bond Yields Instagram @econplusdal Twitter: https://twitter.com/econplusdal Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/EconplusDal-1651992015061685/?ref=aymt_homepage_panel
Views: 24440 EconplusDal
10-year bond yields to reach over 4% interest by 2019: Dennis Gartman
 
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The Gartman Letter editor Dennis Gartman discusses the wild market swings on Wall Street.
Views: 4194 Fox Business
Fiscal Policy: Introduction to Bond Markets and Interest Rate Determination
 
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One of the least understood topics among introductory Econ students is how bond markets work. This video lesson introduces the bond market, and explains how the demand for a government's debt is an important determination of the borrowing costs faced by that government. We will answer some important questions about bond markets, such as, "What's the relationship between bond prices and bond yields?" and "How could budget deficits and debt affect interest rates?" In the next video we'll examine circumstances under which large budget deficits and national debt may NOT drive up a government's borrowing costs. Want to learn more about economics, or just be ready for an upcoming quiz, test or end of year exam? Jason Welker is available for tutoring, IB internal assessment and extended essay support, and other services to support economics students and teachers. Learn more here! http://econclassroom.com/?page_id=5870
Views: 12084 Jason Welker
Bond Prices and Interest Rates
 
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How a bond works, how bond prices change inversely with interest rates, and how open market operations by the FED influence interest rates and the economy.
Views: 43429 TheWyvern66
A Look at the Treasury Market and Interest Rates
 
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In this video I take a close look at the bond market and what it means going forward for the financial markets, Fed policy and the economy. Donations: https://www.goldmoney.com email: [email protected] bitcoin https://blockchain.info/address/14DUCdB6ZPP3su12VeN1BxWgvMHjAVZJSH ethereum 0x5CecA7DB267169Ca6821edADC0baB80b346Ce6c0 https://www.paypal.me/maneco64 https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3730528
Views: 1441 maneco64
The Significance of a 3%-Plus 10-Year Treasury Yield.
 
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In this report the early market action from London on Wednesday, April 25th, 2018. I look at the precious metals, the stock market, the dollar and the bond markets. I also talk about how a break above the 3% yield level for the 10-year note U.S. treasury would mark the probable end of the 30-year plus environment of decreasing interest rates and easy money. I note that since 1981, when the 10-year yield topped near 16%, the U.S. economy and government have been able to take on an exponential amount of debt and credit because of a favorable interest rate environment. My conclusion is that we could be at the very beginning of the unwind of the massive debt bubble that has been built since the early 1980s. Support the channel: BITCOIN: 1AkNoKzbZXJ75BbeGkD2ekUDJQNWDrBgMA ETHEREUM: 0xfffd54e22263f13447032e3941729884e03f4d58 LITECOIN: LY6a8csmuQZyCsBZbLDTQMRuyLdsW9g2na DASH: XgCTCWbz3yMYZKwNH9o8eaEFt45eAUaVuZ https://www.paypal.me/maneco64 https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3730528 maneco64 on D.Tube: https://d.tube/#!/c/maneco64 maneco64 on Steemit: https://steemit.com/@maneco64
Views: 11007 maneco64
Bootstrapping
 
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Calculation of the theoretical Treasury spot rate curve using bootstrapping and the value of a bond using spot rates.
Views: 24317 EduPristine
Treasury Bonds, Interest Rates, The Dollar, and Stock Market
 
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This video describes the recent Treasury Bubble, and explains why that bubble will soon burst.
Views: 4605 stocktradersdaily
9. Yield Curve Arbitrage
 
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Financial Theory (ECON 251) Where can you find the market rates of interest (or equivalently the zero coupon bond prices) for every maturity? This lecture shows how to infer them from the prices of Treasury bonds of every maturity, first using the method of replication, and again using the principle of duality. Treasury bond prices, or at least Treasury bond yields, are published every day in major newspapers. From the zero coupon bond prices one can immediately infer the forward interest rates. Under certain conditions these forward rates can tell us a lot about how traders think the prices of Treasury bonds will evolve in the future. 00:00 - Chapter 1. Defining Yield 09:07 - Chapter 2. Assessing Market Interest Rate from Treasury Bonds 35:46 - Chapter 3. Zero Coupon Bonds and the Principle of Duality 50:31 - Chapter 4. Forward Interest Rate 01:10:05 - Chapter 5. Calculating Prices in the Future and Conclusion Complete course materials are available at the Open Yale Courses website: http://open.yale.edu/courses This course was recorded in Fall 2009.
Views: 49984 YaleCourses
The yield curve | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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Annual Interest Varying with Debt Maturity. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/corp-bankruptcy-tutorial/v/chapter-7-bankruptcy-liquidation?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/annual-interest-varying-with-debt-maturity?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 142609 Khan Academy
Are Treasury Bonds the Least Safe Part of Your Holdings?
 
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Have bonds become the least safe part of your portfolio? "Bonds have experienced a bull market for over 35 years, with bond investors used to earning interest income plus capital appreciation derived from declining yields," said Steve Cucchiaro, founder of 3EDGE. "Now they can suffer from capital depreciation as rates back up with historically low interest income." Cucchiaro is most concerned about long-term Treasury bonds because they are most sensitive to rising rates. In Cucchiaro's view, there seems to be a growing awareness that extraordinary monetary stimulus alone, provided by the world's major central banks, will not be sufficient to lift global economic growth to desired levels. He said increasing calls for fiscal stimulus coupled with rising rates of certain inflation measures has resulted in recently rising bond yields and lower prices for "bond-like" equities such as utilities and REITs. As for international bonds, Cucchiaro said he is avoiding German and Japanese issues as their respective central banks push negative interest rates to spur economic growth. "The Bank of Japan announced in September that they would modify their policy approach by targeting a steeper yield curve in Japan," said Cucchiaro. "This policy shift by the BoJ could mark an interesting turning point in global monetary policy if it proves to be the first of the world's major central banks to realize that ultra-low interest rates and even negative interest rates alone are insufficient to normalize economic growth and inflation." In the U.K., Cucchiaro said the immediate impact of the Brexit referendum has thus far been somewhat cushioned by a decline in the value of pound sterling. However, with an upcoming referendum this fall in Italy, Great Britain's vote to leave may have marked the beginning of the dissolution of the European Union. Finally, Cucchiaro said emerging markets bonds have done well in 2016, but "could be vulnerable to a rise in the U.S. dollar" which would hurt emerging market currencies. Subscribe to TheStreetTV on YouTube: http://t.st/TheStreetTV For more content from TheStreet visit: http://thestreet.com Check out all our videos: http://youtube.com/user/TheStreetTV Follow TheStreet on Twitter: http://twitter.com/thestreet Like TheStreet on Facebook: http://facebook.com/TheStreet Follow TheStreet on LinkedIn: http://linkedin.com/company/theStreet Follow TheStreet on Google+: http://plus.google.com/+TheStreet
What is a yield curve? - MoneyWeek Investment Tutorials
 
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MoneyWeek’s Tim Bennett explains yield curves – what are they? who uses them? and what they can tell you about the economy? Related links… - The basics of bonds - https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AqTjNU7mQZQ Bonds basics part two – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xVcDCsHF_HY Retail bonds: Watch this before you buy one https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SIFHNzTGeXM How to choose a broker https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pS5MEvq_gcs An introduction to financial markets https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UOwi7MBSfhk - What are options and covered warrants? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3196NpHDyec - What are futures? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nwR5b6E0Xo4 MoneyWeek videos are designed to help you become a better investor, and to give you a better understanding of the markets. They’re aimed at both beginners and more experienced investors. In all our videos we explain things in an easy-to-understand way. Some videos are about important ideas and concepts. Others are about investment stories and themes in the news. The emphasis is on clarity and brevity. We don’t want to waste your time with a 20-minute video that could easily be so much shorter. We’ve already made over 200 financial videos and we add more each week. You can see the full archive here at MoneyWeek videos.
Views: 149646 MoneyWeek
JC Parets on Treasury Bonds & Interest Rates
 
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JC Parets from Eagle Bay Capital talks about a possible upcoming breakout in Government debt that should coincide with lower interest rates.
Views: 645 AllStarCharts
Bond Price and Bond Yields - Simplified | Money and Banking Part 3.1 | Indian Economy
 
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How to Prepare Indian Economy for UPSC CSE Prelims 2019 ? Video Link : https://youtu.be/SYuTBEMmzJ4 To Join Economy Prelims Telegram Channel - https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYPRELIMS To Join Economy Mains Channel https://t.me/NEOIASECONOMYMAINS Economy Previous Year Questions Link : https://drive.google.com/open?id=1zmjyKUMAttVddsQ6wInX1zGBKfy-jU0q Learn complete concept of Indian Economy for CIVIL SERVICE EXAMINATION in the simplest way. NEO IAS e-learning classes is an online program which aims to create CIVIL SERVANTS for the development of the nation by providing the video series of complete topics that are relevant for the CIVIL SERVICES (IAS/IPS) Exam.
Short Term High Yield Bonds
 
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The current low interest rate environment means that bond investors have to take more risk in order to gain an attractive return on their invested money. The current low interest rates also present a risk that if interest rates and inflation rise in the future, then bond prices may fall and portfolios could suffer losses.
Views: 7130 hubbis
How High Might Bond Yields Rise?
 
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The Federal Reserve has been raising interest rates for the past couple of years. It looks like they’re signaling that they’re going to continue to raise them over the next year or so, and yet what we’ve seen recently is that longer-term treasury bond yields haven’t been rising as much. On this episode of Bond Market Today, Kathy Jones and Collin Martin discuss how high bond yields might go in this cycle. Subscribe to our channel: https://www.youtube.com/charlesschwab Click here for more insights: http://www.schwab.com/insights/ (0918-890F)
Views: 5875 Charles Schwab
Key Things to Know about Fixed Income ETFs | Fidelity
 
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Find out more about exchange-traded funds with us at the https://www.fidelity.com/learning-center/investment-products/etf/overview To see more videos from Fidelity Investments, subscribe to: https://www.youtube.com/fidelityinvestments Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/fidelityinvestments Twitter: https://www.twitter.com/fidelity Google+: https://plus.google.com/+fidelity LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/company/fidelity-investments ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Fixed income can be a critical part of nearly every well-diversified portfolio. Used correctly, fixed income can add diversification and a steady source of income to any investor’s portfolio. But how do you choose the right fixed-income ETF? The key to choosing the right fixed-income ETF lies in what it actually holds. U.S. bonds or international bonds? Government securities or corporate debt? Bonds that come due in two years or 20 years? Each decision determines the level of risk you’re taking and the potential return. There are many types of risks to consider with bond investing. Let’s talk more about two in particular: Credit risk and Interest-rate risk. Determining the level of credit risk you want to assume is an important first step when choosing a fixed-income ETF. Do you want an ETF that only holds conservative bonds—like bonds issued by the U.S. Treasury? Or do you want one holding riskier corporate debt? The latter may pay you a higher interest rate, but if the company issuing the bond goes bankrupt, you’ll lose out. ETFs cover the full range of available credit. Look carefully at the credit quality composition of the ETFs underlying holdings, and don’t be lured in by promises of high yields unless you understand the risks. Bonds are funny. Intuitively, you would assume that higher interest rates are good for bondholders, as they can reinvest bond income at higher prevailing interest rates. But rising interest rates may be bad news, at least in the short term. Imagine that the government issues a 10-year bond paying an interest rate of 2%. But shortly thereafter, the U.S. Federal Reserve hikes interest rates. Now, if the government wants to issue a new 10-year bond, it has to pay 3% a year in interest. No one is going to pay the same amount for the 2% bond as the 3% bond; instead, the price of the 2% bond will have to fall to make its yield as attractive as the new, higher-yielding security. That’s how bonds work, like a seesaw: As yields rise, prices fall and vice versa. Another important measure to consider when looking at interest rate risk is duration which helps to approximate the degree of price sensitivity of a bond to changes in interest rates. The longer the duration, the more any change in interest rates will affect your investment. Conversely, the shorter the duration, the less any change in interest rates will affect your investment. Let’s review a few other considerations when looking at fixed income ETFs. First, expense ratios: Because your expected return in a bond ETF is lower than in most stock ETFs, expenses take on extra importance. Generally speaking, the lower the fees, the better. Second, tracking difference: It can be harder to run a bond index fund than an equity fund, so you may see significant variation between the fund’s performance and the index’s returns. Try to seek out funds with low levels of tracking difference, meaning they track their index well. Finally, some bonds can be illiquid. As a result, it’s extra important to look out for bond ETFs with good trading volumes and tight spreads. There are other factors to watch for too, but these are the basics. ETFs can be a great tool for accessing the bond space, but as with anything, it pays to know what you’re buying before you make the leap. Fidelity Brokerage Services LLC, Member NYSE, SIPC, 900 Salem Street, Smithfield, Rhode Island, 02917 723251.2.0
Views: 51870 Fidelity Investments
Treasury Bonds Interest Rate
 
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Treasury Bonds Interest Rate - http://FREECharts.net TREASURY BOND : 00:00:05 Treasury Bond 00:00:17 Buying Treasury Bonds 00:00:29 Treasury Bond Yields 00:00:41 How To Buy Treasury Bonds 00:00:53 What Are Treasury Bonds Treasury Bond Treasury Bonds: One of the most liquid markets in the world, treasury bonds and treasury notes are the nations debt so clearly debt instruments will be here as long as America has a dysfunctional government https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8qi44ZEjZk
Views: 67 Derek Rice
Basil blames Treasury bond issue for interest rate hike
 
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Owing to the controversial Treasury bond issue, interest rates in Sri Lanka have started to go up, former Minister Basil Rajapaksa says. මහ බැංකු බැඳුම්කර වංචාව හේතුවෙන් වර්තමානය වන විට රට තුළ පොලී අනුපාතය ඉහළ ගොස් ඇති බව හිටපු ආර්ථික සංවර්ධන අමාත්‍ය බැසිල් රාජපක්ෂ මහතා පවසයි. Watch More Video - http://goo.gl/2QWjSA
Views: 922 Ada Derana
Bonds Effective Interest Method - Discount
 
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This video explains how to calculate a bond that sells at a discount. It shows the corresponding journal entries on the original sale and interest payments. It also shows how to prepare the amortization table and explains what the numbers represent.
Views: 23286 mattfisher64
Bootstrapping using Treasury spot rates
 
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How to estimate treasury spot rates (term of structure interest rates) based on Treasury yields.
Views: 2969 Qobil Yunusov
Introduction to bonds | Stocks and bonds | Finance & Capital Markets | Khan Academy
 
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What it means to buy a bond. Created by Sal Khan. Watch the next lesson: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/introduction-to-the-yield-curve?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Missed the previous lesson? Watch here: https://www.khanacademy.org/economics-finance-domain/core-finance/stock-and-bonds/bonds-tutorial/v/corporate-debt-versus-traditional-mortgages?utm_source=YT&utm_medium=Desc&utm_campaign=financeandcapitalmarkets Finance and capital markets on Khan Academy: Both corporations and governments can borrow money by selling bonds. This tutorial explains how this works and how bond prices relate to interest rates. In general, understanding this not only helps you with your own investing, but gives you a lens on the entire global economy. About Khan Academy: Khan Academy offers practice exercises, instructional videos, and a personalized learning dashboard that empower learners to study at their own pace in and outside of the classroom. We tackle math, science, computer programming, history, art history, economics, and more. Our math missions guide learners from kindergarten to calculus using state-of-the-art, adaptive technology that identifies strengths and learning gaps. We've also partnered with institutions like NASA, The Museum of Modern Art, The California Academy of Sciences, and MIT to offer specialized content. For free. For everyone. Forever. #YouCanLearnAnything Subscribe to Khan Academy’s Finance and Capital Markets channel: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCQ1Rt02HirUvBK2D2-ZO_2g?sub_confirmation=1 Subscribe to Khan Academy: https://www.youtube.com/subscription_center?add_user=khanacademy
Views: 480340 Khan Academy
Zero Coupon Bonds
 
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Why buy a bond that pays no interest? This video helps you understand what a zero coupon bond is and how it can be beneficial. It details when you should expect to receive a return after buying a zero coupon bond and some of its unique features. Questions or Comments? Have a question or topic you’d like to learn more about? Let us know: Twitter: @ZionsDirectTV Facebook: www.facebook.com/zionsdirect Or leave a comment on one of our videos. Open an Account: Begin investing today by opening a brokerage account or IRA at www.zionsdirect.com Bid in our Auctions: Participate in our fixed-income security auctions with no commissions or mark-ups charged by Zions Direct at www.auctions.zionsdirect.com
Views: 33864 Zions TV
Treasury Bills: How To Calculate  Your Earnings
 
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The interest rates on Treasury bills have become so attractive that investment savvy individuals no longer want to keep their money with the banks but have been requesting that their banks invest their deposits in Treasury bills on their behalf. See more interesting Business Updates on Bounce News App - http://bit.ly/BounceNewsNg FACEBOOK https://www.facebook.com/BounceNewsNigeria TWITTER https://twitter.com/BounceNewsNg INSTAGRAM https://www.instagram.com/bouncenewsng/
Views: 3666 Bounce News Nigeria
UK Interest Rates Spiking Higher! 10 Year Gilt Yield Doubles in Two Months.
 
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In this video I talk about the Gilt (UK government bond) market and the ramifications of rising yields and a steepening yield curve. UK Rates & Bonds: http://www.bloomberg.com/markets/rates-bonds/government-bonds/uk Donations: https://www.goldmoney.com email: [email protected] bitcoin https://blockchain.info/address/14DUCdB6ZPP3su12VeN1BxWgvMHjAVZJSH ethereum 0x5CecA7DB267169Ca6821edADC0baB80b346Ce6c0 https://www.paypal.me/maneco64 https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3730528
Views: 2306 maneco64
Why are Treasury yields rising?
 
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NatAlliance Securities global fixed income head Andy Brenner and Palisade Capital Management CIO Dan Veru on why U.S. government bond yields are beginning to rise and the benefits of convertible securities.
Views: 1198 Fox Business
How Do Banks Determine Mortgage Interest Rates?
 
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http://www.bestsyndication.com/?q=how-are-mortgage_rates_determined.htm Have you ever wondered why banks continually change mortgage interest rates? There are many factors that help lenders determine both fixed rate and ARM mortgages. This video will explain how the interest rate is determined. There are many factors that affect mortgage rates including government bonds, rates that the government sponsored enterprise charge and the London Interbank Offered Rate. In this information program, we will discuss how these benchmarks are used to help bankers determine mortgage rates. One common benchmark cited for determining mortgage rates is the Federal Funds rate. This is the rate that banks charge other banks for overnight operations. That rate is currently in a range between zero and 0.25 percent. The discount rate is the Federal Reserve's primary interest rate. This is the rate that the Federal Reserve, also known as our central bank, charges member banks. Unlike the Federal Funds rate, the Federal Reserve Bank has absolute power in determining this interest rate. The current primary rate for the member banks is 0.75 percent. Banks that are not eligible for this primary rate are charged 1.25 percent. A third seasonal rate is for small depository institutions that need to meet seasonal requirements. The Prime Rate is what banks charge their best customers, usually corporations and large companies. This rate is typically 2.5 to 3 percent above the Federal Funds rate. These rates rarely change, so why do mortgage rates fluctuate so frequently? There are other benchmarks, including government bonds. The "Capital Markets" play a major role in mortgage loan rates. Investors are constantly looking for safety and a return on their investment. The safest investment has U.S. government bonds, notes and bills. But the rate of return is relatively meager compared to what they could get buying other securities. Investors willing to take a little more risk might consider stocks or mortgage backed securities. Typically, in better economic times they are willing to make riskier investments. Government securities have historically been considered low risk investments. Similar to a heard of cattle or sheep, after the sign of economic uncertainty investors will flock to these securities. This drives down yields. Here is an example. Let's say there is a 100 dollar Treasury bill offered that will pay 110 dollars on maturity. If there is a lot of demand for the T-bill, the price will increase. You might bid 100 dollar, but your neighbor may bid 105 dollar for that same security. The higher the price for that T-bill will lower the yield. Rather than yielding 10 dollars at face value, the bill will not yield only five dollars. Conversely, when demand for bonds fall, the interest yielded on them increases. Banks and other lenders are also in competition for investor dollars. If Treasury yields go higher, banks need to offer investors a better return on their investment too. Thus, they need to increase the interest rate to the homeowner / borrower. Since the 30-year mortgage is usually paid-off or refinanced before 10 year, the 10-year note is one of the better benchmarks bankers use to determine mortgage rates. Since buying mortgages is more risky than buying government Treasuries, banks need to pay a premium for that risk. That premium has historically been around 1.5 to 2.0 percent. If the 10-year note is providing a yield of three percent, expect the 30-year mortgage interest rate to be somewhere around 4.75 percent. The Adjustable Rate Mortgage (ARM) will usually carry a 30-year term but will have a variable interest rate starting after 5 years. Typically the rate will adjust once a year after that. Banks will use several benchmark indexes to make that adjustment. The most common benchmarks are the London InterBank Offered Rate, or LIBOR, and the Prime Rate.
Views: 12892 BestSyndication
FRM: Treasury STRIPS
 
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P-STRIPS and C-STRIPS are popular because: 1. They can be combined or re-constructed into any required sequence of cash flows, and 2. They are more sensitive to interest rates (i.e., higher duration) than coupon-bearing bonds (all other things being equal). For more financial risk videos, visit our website! http://www.bionicturtle.com
Views: 27295 Bionic Turtle
Session 07: Objective 1 - Bonds and Bond Valuation
 
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The Finance Coach: Introduction to Corporate Finance with Greg Pierce Textbook: Fundamentals of Corporate Finance Ross, Westerfield, Jordan Chapter 7: Interest Rates and Bond Valuation Objective 1 - Key Objective: Bonds Bond Cycle Inverse relationship between bond value and interest rate Face Value vs. Discount vs. Premium Bond To minimize interest rate risk purchase a bond with 1) shorter time to maturity 2) higher coupon rate Semiannual vs. Annual Coupons Bond Value Formula Coupon (C) Time to Maturity (t) Yield to Maturity (r) Face value paid at maturity (FV) Fisher Effect (Exact vs. Approximate) Nominal Rate (R) Real Rate (r) Inflation Rate (h) More Information at: http://thefincoach.com/
Views: 34515 TheFinCoach
Understanding How the Federal Reserve Works - Documentary Films
 
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CLICK HERE - http://activeterium.com/1DCR - FOR MORE FREE DOCUMENTARIES Understanding How the Federal Reserve Works - Documentary Films For over a century, the privately owned and operated Federal Reserve Banking system has controlled this nation's money supply and credit. This institution and its economic policies are an enigma to most government officials and American citizens. To understand the Federal Reserve Bank, we have to first look at how it operates. We can then understand why our founding fathers were opposed to such a system for the United States of America. The Federal Reserve is what is known as a central bank. This bank is not regulated by the United States government. It creates the nation's money supply, loans it back to the government at interest, and regulates interest rates on the money it loaned out. However, the Federal Reserve, also commonly called "the Fed," does not loan out money held in its vaults. Instead, it creates new money for circulation by adding credits to an account. Thus, they are creating new money that never existed before. How much money can be created out of nothing? The Fed is only required to hold ten percent in reserves, and can loan out ninety percent. One of the Federal Reserve's publications states, "Of course, they (the banks) do not really pay out loans from the money received from deposits. What they do when they make loans is to accept promissory notes (money) for credits to the borrowers account." Actual currency is relative to the amount of new loans in demand. In short our system is based on debt. New money cannot be created unless banks issue new loans. The Federal Reserve is a private bank. It loans America it's currency at interest like any other bank, and process works like this. The federal government needs to make more money. It has the Federal Reserve print reserve notes (money) worth a set value. The federal government then prints treasury bonds, which is basically a promissory note to pay back the loan of the currency at interest. In simple terms our government is in debt to the Federal Reserve as soon as the money is created. If the government is in debt to the Fed, who makes the money, and the only way to get out debt is make more money, and the people who make the money are charging interest; how would the debt ever be paid off? It doesn't. As stated by the great scientist and creator of the light bulb, Thomas Edison wrote, "If our nation can issue a dollar bond, it can issue a dollar bill. The element that makes the bond good, makes the bill good, also. The difference between the bond and the bill is that the bond lets money brokers collect twice the amount of the bond and an additional 20%, whereas the currency pays nobody but those who contribute directly in some useful way. It is absurd to say that our country can issue $30 million in bonds and not $30 million in currency. Both are promises to pay, but one promise fattens the usurers and the other helps the people." Understanding How the Federal Reserve Works - Documentary Films
Views: 24527 Documentary Films
Bonds: Spot Rates vs. Yield to Maturity
 
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What's the difference between a spot rate and a bond's yield-to-maturity? In this video you'll learn how to find the price of the bond using spot rates, as well as how to find the yield-to-maturity of a bond once we know it's price. Simply put, spot rates are used to discount cash flows happening at a particular point in time, back to time 0. A bond's yield-to-maturity is the overall return that the investor will make by purchasing the bond - think of it as a weighted average!
Views: 2537 Arnold Tutoring
FRM: Treasury bond futures: conversion factor
 
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The short position in a US Treasury bond futures contract can select among many different eligible (maturity greater than 15 years) bonds for delivery. This is by design; the Fed and Treasury do NOT want to see a "run on the issue" if only one bond can be delivered. The conversion factor puts the eligible bonds on a level playing field, making the short almost (but not quite) indifferent to which bond is delivered. For more financial risk videos, visit our website! http://www.bionicturtle.com
Views: 38990 Bionic Turtle
U.S. Bond Market Alert! 10-year Yield Spikes to 7-year High!
 
01:14:18
Use promo code maneco64 to get 0.5% discount at https://www.goldinvestments.co.uk/ Support the channel: maneco64 store: https://teespring.com/en-GB/stores/maneco64 https://www.paypal.me/maneco64 https://www.patreon.com/user?u=3730528 BITCOIN: 1AkNoKzbZXJ75BbeGkD2ekUDJQNWDrBgMA BITCOIN CASH: qzfcsu05c9ephzv8qzl7ysvn4lfclzneescfhre4r5 ETHEREUM: 0xfffd54e22263f13447032e3941729884e03f4d58 LITECOIN: LY6a8csmuQZyCsBZbLDTQMRuyLdsW9g2na DASH: XgCTCWbz3yMYZKwNH9o8eaEFt45eA 'The End of Alchemy" by Mervyn King: https://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/0349140677/ref=as_li_tl?ie=UTF8&tag=maneco64-21&camp=1634&creative=6738&linkCode=as2&creativeASIN=0349140677&linkId=e2a08014f7e6a2185e1b3b02e8617498
Views: 3635 maneco64
FRM: Bootstrapping the Treasury spot rate curve
 
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The theoretical spot rate curve is different than the par yield curve. Here is how to bootstrap the spot rate. For more financial risk videos, visit our website! http://www.bionicturtle.com
Views: 84410 Bionic Turtle
Morgan's Caron Discusses 10-Year Treasury Bond Yields: Video
 
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March 29 (Bloomberg) -- James Caron, global head of interest-rate strategy at Morgan Stanley, talks with Bloomberg's Scarlet Fu about the outlook for the yield on the 10-year U.S. Treasury note. (This report is an excerpt. Source: Bloomberg)
Views: 258 Bloomberg
Two Ways To Buy US Treasuries
 
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Here are two ways to invest in US Treasuries. To learn more I would recommend reading the "treasury bills in depth" article on the treasury direct website: https://www.treasurydirect.gov/indiv/research/indepth/tbills/res_tbill.htm
Views: 5379 ZentRose
Bonds, notes and bills
 
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So much government debt! But what's the difference between the Treasury's bills, notes and bonds? Senior Editor Paddy Hirsch explains. More coverage of the financial crisis is at marketplace.org/financialcrisis
Views: 102055 Marketplace APM
What is a Treasury Bond (T-Bond)?
 
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Welcome to the Investors Trading Academy talking glossary of financial terms and events. Our word of the day is “Treasury Bond or T-Bond” A T-bond is a marketable, fixed-interest government debt security with a maturity of more than 10 years. Treasury bonds make interest payments semi-annually and the income that holders receive is only taxed at the federal level. Treasury bonds are issued with a minimum denomination of $1,000. The bonds are initially sold through auction in which the maximum purchase amount is $5 million if the bid is non-competitive or 35% of the offering if the bid is competitive. A competitive bid states the rate that the bidder is willing to accept; it will be accepted depending on how it compares to the set rate of the bond. A non-competitive bid ensures that the bidder will get the bond but he or she will have to accept the set rate. After the auction, the bonds can be sold in the secondary market. By Barry Norman, Investors Trading Academy
What impact will rising Treasury yields and inflation have on bonds?
 
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Senior Portfolio Manager R.J. Gallo offers his perspective on potential impact on fixed income from increasing interest rates, inflation and 10-year Treasury yields. Views as of 06-21-2018. For disclosure, visit http://bit:ly/FederatedYouTube. For more information, visit http://www.federatedinvestors.com.
Views: 28803 FederatedInvestors
government bond explained | government schemes 2018 | What are bonds | latest bonds
 
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Hello friends in this video we will see latest bonds from government. The government has announced the launch of 7.75% Savings (Taxable) Bonds, 2018, which will open for subscription from January 10, 2018. The bonds will have a maturity of seven years. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Share, Support, Subscribe!!! Subscribe: https://goo.gl/yNw13g Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/c/Finbaba Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/finbabaIndia Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/finbabaIndia Instagram: http://instagram.com/finbabaIndia ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Subscribe Our Channel click Here for Latest Video https://goo.gl/yNw13g ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Related Videos : Save Tax under section 80C : https://youtu.be/y5Sat6TcJHs Mutual funds : https://youtu.be/-gP4HfMCeBQ Gold ETFS :https://youtu.be/EPjiho6m1XI Arbitrage fund : https://youtu.be/3oyryG22H4I How to find stop loss : https://youtu.be/jZugeeEVSP0 FCNR account : https://youtu.be/G4GFoQFy_RI Stock Market Tax : https://youtu.be/hcYDeXEW6eY Stock Split : https://youtu.be/NQpW2oBemyk How to Buy Share Onlie https://youtu.be/g8Eb1LVNXM0 What is Cnadle stick https://youtu.be/-Sjhv7h3IT8 ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- Open Demat account :https://zerodha.com/open-account?c=ZMPASV ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------- About: FinBaba is a you-tube channel, where you can get Information about Banking, finance, Stock market basic and Advance, Forex, Mutual funds and many more. Thanks For Watching this Video. !
Views: 52356 Fin Baba
Investopedia Video: Zero-Coupon Bond
 
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A debt security that doesn't pay interest (a coupon) but is traded at a deep discount, rendering profit at maturity when the bond is redeemed for its full face value. For more Investopedia videos, check out; http://www.investopedia.com/video/
Views: 48288 Investopedia

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