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Qualitative analysis of interview data: A step-by-step guide
 
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The content applies to qualitative data analysis in general. Do not forget to share this Youtube link with your friends. The steps are also described in writing below (Click Show more): STEP 1, reading the transcripts 1.1. Browse through all transcripts, as a whole. 1.2. Make notes about your impressions. 1.3. Read the transcripts again, one by one. 1.4. Read very carefully, line by line. STEP 2, labeling relevant pieces 2.1. Label relevant words, phrases, sentences, or sections. 2.2. Labels can be about actions, activities, concepts, differences, opinions, processes, or whatever you think is relevant. 2.3. You might decide that something is relevant to code because: *it is repeated in several places; *the interviewee explicitly states that it is important; *you have read about something similar in reports, e.g. scientific articles; *it reminds you of a theory or a concept; *or for some other reason that you think is relevant. You can use preconceived theories and concepts, be open-minded, aim for a description of things that are superficial, or aim for a conceptualization of underlying patterns. It is all up to you. It is your study and your choice of methodology. You are the interpreter and these phenomena are highlighted because you consider them important. Just make sure that you tell your reader about your methodology, under the heading Method. Be unbiased, stay close to the data, i.e. the transcripts, and do not hesitate to code plenty of phenomena. You can have lots of codes, even hundreds. STEP 3, decide which codes are the most important, and create categories by bringing several codes together 3.1. Go through all the codes created in the previous step. Read them, with a pen in your hand. 3.2. You can create new codes by combining two or more codes. 3.3. You do not have to use all the codes that you created in the previous step. 3.4. In fact, many of these initial codes can now be dropped. 3.5. Keep the codes that you think are important and group them together in the way you want. 3.6. Create categories. (You can call them themes if you want.) 3.7. The categories do not have to be of the same type. They can be about objects, processes, differences, or whatever. 3.8. Be unbiased, creative and open-minded. 3.9. Your work now, compared to the previous steps, is on a more general, abstract level. You are conceptualizing your data. STEP 4, label categories and decide which are the most relevant and how they are connected to each other 4.1. Label the categories. Here are some examples: Adaptation (Category) Updating rulebook (sub-category) Changing schedule (sub-category) New routines (sub-category) Seeking information (Category) Talking to colleagues (sub-category) Reading journals (sub-category) Attending meetings (sub-category) Problem solving (Category) Locate and fix problems fast (sub-category) Quick alarm systems (sub-category) 4.2. Describe the connections between them. 4.3. The categories and the connections are the main result of your study. It is new knowledge about the world, from the perspective of the participants in your study. STEP 5, some options 5.1. Decide if there is a hierarchy among the categories. 5.2. Decide if one category is more important than the other. 5.3. Draw a figure to summarize your results. STEP 6, write up your results 6.1. Under the heading Results, describe the categories and how they are connected. Use a neutral voice, and do not interpret your results. 6.2. Under the heading Discussion, write out your interpretations and discuss your results. Interpret the results in light of, for example: *results from similar, previous studies published in relevant scientific journals; *theories or concepts from your field; *other relevant aspects. STEP 7 Ending remark Nb: it is also OK not to divide the data into segments. Narrative analysis of interview transcripts, for example, does not rely on the fragmentation of the interview data. (Narrative analysis is not discussed in this tutorial.) Further, I have assumed that your task is to make sense of a lot of unstructured data, i.e. that you have qualitative data in the form of interview transcripts. However, remember that most of the things I have said in this tutorial are basic, and also apply to qualitative analysis in general. You can use the steps described in this tutorial to analyze: *notes from participatory observations; *documents; *web pages; *or other types of qualitative data. STEP 8 Suggested reading Alan Bryman's book: 'Social Research Methods' published by Oxford University Press. Steinar Kvale's and Svend Brinkmann's book 'InterViews: Learning the Craft of Qualitative Research Interviewing' published by SAGE. Text and video (including audio) © Kent Löfgren, Sweden
Views: 691216 Kent Löfgren
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Data Analysis (Module 5)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 5. Bradley EH, Curry LA, Devers K. Qualitative data analysis for health services research: Developing taxonomy, themes, and theory. Health Services Research, 2007; 42(4):1758-1772. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 154285 YaleUniversity
Analysing your Interviews
 
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This video is part of the University of Southampton, Southampton Education School, Digital Media Resources http://www.southampton.ac.uk/education http://www.southampton.ac.uk/~sesvideo/
5.3 Unstructured, Semi-Structured and Structured Interviews
 
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If you are having troubles with your research paper, I might have a solution for you. My full course "Research Methods for Business Students" is available on Udemy. Here you can also submit YOUR questions to me and receive FEEDBACK ON YOUR PAPER! As you are my students, the course is only for 9.99 USD with following link: https://www.udemy.com/research-methods-for-business-students/?couponCode=RESEARCH_METHODS_1
Views: 34633 MeanThat
How to Know You Are Coding Correctly: Qualitative Research Methods
 
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Coding your qualitative data, whether that is interview transcripts, surveys, video, or photographs, is a subjective process. So how can you know when you are doing it well? We give you some basic tips.
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Interviews (Module 3)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 3. Britten N. Qualitative research: Qualitative interviews and medical research. British Medical Journal 1995;311:251-253. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 81755 YaleUniversity
How to do a research interview
 
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After a short introduction looking at Steinar Kvale's 10 criteria of a good interviewer, this video examines two interviews: one a short and rather poor attempt, the other a longer and much improved version. It is designed to help anyone learning how to undertake research interviews in the social sciences. In addition to the references mentioned in the video you might be interested in this text by colleagues of mine: King, N., & Horrocks, C. (2010). Interviews in Qualitative Research. London: Sage.
Views: 183537 Graham R Gibbs
Qualitative Data Analysis - Coding & Developing Themes
 
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This is a short practical guide to Qualitative Data Analysis
Views: 108288 James Woodall
Best Way to Answer Behavioral Interview Questions
 
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Watch Don answer sample Behavioral questions. Learn how to answer behavioral interview questions using the STAR Formula. Employers love asking behavioral questions during the interview process because this type of questioning will does a better job of revealing your core competencies and is a great indicator of how well you'll be able to perform this job. Behavioral questions can be answered using the STAR formula and in this video, we break down the STAR formula and show you how to use it to your advantage to you are prepared to answer any behavioral question that comes your way. How to Answer Behavioral Interview Questions Using the STAR Formula STAR stands for: Situation – Task – Action - Result 1. First, describe a work related Situation or Task that you needed to accomplish, and be concise. 2. Then describe the Action you took. Don’t tell them what you might do or would do, you need to tell them what you did. 3. Finally, describe what happened -- the result. What did you accomplish? What did you learn? How much time or money did you save? And most importantly does your result solve the problem you described in step 1. That’s the formula for answering any behavioral question. Behavioral or competency-based interviews are simply a set of questions that ask you to talk about examples from your past work experience to help an interviewer figure out your strengths. Behavioral interviewers will look for the three parts (Problem, Action, Results) of your answer and take notes about how you answered the question. In this free program you’ll learn how to improve your interview performance with my simple step-by-step formula for interview success. To get the list of behavioral questions this video mentions, you need to register for this free program here: http://www.jobinterviewtools.com/advantage/ To download the complete interview answer guide go to http://www.jobinterviewtools.com
Views: 1290557 Don Georgevich
Interviewing with McKinsey: Case study interview
 
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Learn what to expect during the case study interview. Hear what some recent hires did - and did not - do to prepare.
Views: 574527 McKinsey & Company
Using In-Depth Interviews (IDIs) In Your Research: Qualitative Research Methods
 
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Wondering how to do a valid In-Depth Interview with subjects in your qualitative research project? We give you some tips. See our other modules on many related topics at Mod-U: https://modu.ssri.duke.edu
Interview as a method for qualitative research
 
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The qualitative research interview seeks to describe and the meanings of central themes in the life world of the subjects. The main task in interviewing is to understand the meaning of what the interviewees say. For a comprehensive presentation of this method, see Jaber F. Gubrium and James A. Holstein's (2002) "Handbook of Interview Research." For a deconstruction of subjectivity in the interview, see James A. Holstein and Jaber F. Gubrium (1995) "The Active Interview."-- Created using PowToon -- Free sign up at http://www.powtoon.com/ . Make your own animated videos and animated presentations for free. PowToon is a free tool that allows you to develop cool animated clips and animated presentations for your website, office meeting, sales pitch, nonprofit fundraiser, product launch, video resume, or anything else you could use an animated explainer video. PowToon's animation templates help you create animated presentations and animated explainer videos from scratch. Anyone can produce awesome animations quickly with PowToon, without the cost or hassle other professional animation services require.
Views: 48682 adly hafidzin
What makes a good interview? - Advanced qualitative methods
 
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In part 2 of a 6 part discussion, Fiona Holland and James Elander from the University of Derby discuss the elements that contribute to a good qualitative research project. To find out more visit http://www.derby.ac.uk/ehs
Views: 35612 University of Derby
Analyzing Data from a Focus Group
 
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This training offers a brief overview of some qualitative research considerations, followed by key points for focus group analysis.
Views: 18394 CSSLOhioStateU
Data Collection I: Surveys, Interviews, Observations (COM1110 English Communication Skills)
 
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Lecture on data collection methods (survey, interview and observations) for COM1110 English Communication Skills)
Views: 18302 Lisa Kwan
6 tips for analysing a semi-structured interviews: powerpoint version
 
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So, you want to have completed your semi-structured interview – well done you! Not sure of the best way to do now? I will show you how analyse your data so you can produce meaningful answers to your research question. In qualitative research, data analysis happens at the same time as data collection and the process is iterative, meaning you return to the data often and each time you do you become more steeped in the data. It requires ample time for iteration and reflection. There are many different analytical frameworks that researchers use to guide the interpretation of their qualitative data, but that’s the subject of another video. For this video, I will simply focus on what you need to do with the interview data you have collected. Immediately after an interview, make notes of the ideas and questions that occur to you. Next organise and store your data. You must label your data in a way that does not attach participants’ names to the data and store your data in a way that ensures you fulfil the promise of confidentiality you made to the participant at the interview stage. If you want to refresh yourself about collecting data – go back and watch our short video – 6 Tips for conducting semi-structured interviews! (Show the Thumbnail for 6 Tips for conducting semi-structured interviews here https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8z8XV1S7548&t=4s). If you have recorded your interview, and I really recommend that you do then you need to transcribe the audio or video. Transcription is simple but time-consuming, you simply listen to recording and write down verbatim (i.e. word for word) what the participant says. If you want to save time you could consider using software to help you transcribe or use a transcription service. I have some links below on useful software and transcription services. Once you have your transcript you are now ready to start interpreting your data. You can do this manually but if you have a lot of data (say more than 10 interviews) then I strongly advise you use a software programme. I use NVIVO and I have put some links to that software. You do need to take time to learn how to use the software but there are tons of videos online to help you learn fast. I have put some links down below. First read your transcript and identify themes. Give the theme a name – this process is called coding. Keep notes of why you have named the theme in a specific way. These notes are called memos. Note also in your memos any exemplars i.e. things that you were not expecting and those that surprised you. Once you completed reading and coding one transcript, repeat the process for other interviews and start to identify themes that recur across your interviews. Then writing up is easy just describe the codes, the links between the themes and any patterns you noticed. You can also compare your themes and patterns to existing theory – does it agree or disagree? Let’s summarise! 1. Immediately after the interview make notes 2. Label and store your data 3. Transcribe your data 4. Code the data 5. Identify thematic patterns 6. Write up your findings If you found this video useful – please like and hit the subscribe button! Remember to click on the bell so you can be reminded when we upload new videos. Want to make videos like this? Go http://track.fiverr.com/visit/?bta=20153&nci=5490
Content Analysis Coding
 
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Views: 145279 Sam Cotton
Coding Part 1: Alan Bryman's 4 Stages of qualitative analysis
 
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An overview of the process of qualitative data analysis based on Alan Bryman's four stages of analysis. Reference Bryman, A (2001) Social Research Methods, Oxford: Oxford University Press This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
Views: 196110 Graham R Gibbs
Coding Part 2: Thematic coding
 
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Thematic coding is one of the most common forms of qualitative data analysis and it is found in grounded theory, several forms of phenomenological analysis and framework analysis. The analyst tries to identify themes, categories or classifications of the data. Passages of the data (commonly an interview transcript) are coded to the themes - that is the passages are tagged or marked with the name of the theme. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International (CC BY-NC-SA 4.0) http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/4.0/
Views: 179822 Graham R Gibbs
What Does Coding Looks Like?: Qualitative Research Methods
 
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You may be told that you need to "code" some qualitative data like interview transcripts, photos, or audio clips, but what does coding look like? We give you the basics. See our other modules on many related topics at Mod-U: https://modu.ssri.duke.edu
Data collection methods: Interviews
 
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In this video Professor Kevin Burden explains pros and cons of using interviews to collect research data
Views: 26 Dr. Kevin Burden
Demo qualitative interview with mistakes
 
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Can you spot at least 10 mistakes made by this interviewer? Then watch her do the same interview again, correctly, in the next video and notice she gets different (and much more useful) answers. Interview from I-TECH www.go2tech.org - an amazing organisation that trains healthcare workers for resource poor countries.
Views: 79327 Joanna Chrzanowska
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Focus Groups (Module 4)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 4. Morgan D. Focus groups. Annual Review Sociology 1996;22:129-152. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 79169 YaleUniversity
Qualitative Data Collection
 
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Table of Contents: 00:00 - Qualitative Data Collection & Sampling Strategies 00:36 - How might you collect data for a qualitative study? 03:10 - Qualitative Interviews 07:34 - Tips for constructing interview questions 09:29 - Constructing good qualitative interview questions 15:22 - Tips for conducting effective interviews 19:42 - Focus groups 24:32 - Observation 28:01 - Documents 30:17 - Purposive sampling in qualitative research
Views: 17941 Molly Ott
Conducting Qualitative Analysis Using NVivo 11 (Part1) by Philip Adu, Ph.D.
 
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Manually analyzing qualitative data could be burdensome and time consuming. The introduction of user-friendly qualitative data analysis software such as NVivo has made analyzing qualitative data less stressful and more enjoyable. However, figuring out how to: import files, analyze data, create memos and annotations, organize cases and characteristics, and visualize and export findings turns out to be challenging to first-time-users of the NVivo software. With this webinar, Dr. Philip Adu presents a step-by-step process of analyzing qualitative data using NVivo software. To access the PowerPoint slides, please go to: https://www.slideshare.net/kontorphilip/conducting-qualitative-analysis-using-nvivo-a-quick-reference To buy Dr. Philip Adu's new book, 'A Step-by-Step Guide to Qualitative Data Coding', please go to Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Step-Step-Guide-Qualitative-Coding/dp/1138486876/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1543874247&sr=8-3&keywords=Philip+adu)
Part 1 - Using Excel for Open-ended Question Data Analysis
 
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Completing data analysis on open-ended questions using Excel. For analyzing multiple responses to an open-ended question see Part 2: https://youtu.be/J_whxIVjNiY Note: Selecting "HD" in the video settings (click on the "gear" icon) makes it easier to view the data entries
Views: 159518 Jacqueline C
Doing a transcription for qualitative research
 
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In this 16 minute video, Graham R Gibbs discusses some of the issues behind transcribing an interview or getting someone else to do it for you. PowerPoint files for the session are here: http://onlineqda.hud.ac.uk/movies/PowerPoints.php
Views: 29485 Graham R Gibbs
Introduction to Text Analysis with NVivo 11 for Windows
 
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It’s easy to get lost in a lot of text-based data. NVivo is qualitative data analysis software that provides structure to text, helping you quickly unlock insights and make something beautiful to share. http://www.qsrinternational.com
Views: 124165 NVivo by QSR
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: What is Qualitative Research (Module 1)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to module 1. Patton M. Qualitative Research and Evaluation Methods, 3rd edition. Sage Publishers; 2002. Curry L, Nembhard I, Bradley E. Qualitative and mixed methods provide unique contributions to outcomes research. Circulation, 2009;119:1442-1452. Crabtree, B. & Miller, W. (1999). Doing qualitative research, 2nd edition. Newbury Park, CA:Sage. Schensul S, Schensul J. and Lecompte M. 2012 Initiating Ethnographic research: A mixed Methods Approach, Altamira press. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 201676 YaleUniversity
Semi-Structured Interviews
 
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an assignment for LIBR - 285, Spring 2013
Views: 12487 opaopadeath
Thematic Analysis Process
 
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Views: 99996 ProfCTimm
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Developing a Qualitative Research Question (Module 2)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 2. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 90951 YaleUniversity
Implenting In-Depth Interviews (IDIs) Well: Qualitative Research Methods
 
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It can be a lot of work to run a valid In-Depth Interview to gather data for your research, so we provide some tips to help you make that process go more easily. See our other modules on many related topics at Mod-U: https://modu.ssri.duke.edu
NVivo 11 Demonstration for Beginners: Preparing Data for Analysis (Part 1)
 
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There are two main ways of preparing interview transcript for NVivo analysis: using Microsoft Word or through Excel. This video demonstrates how to use the two strategies. To buy Dr. Philip Adu's new book, 'A Step-by-Step Guide to Qualitative Data Coding', please go to Amazon (https://www.amazon.com/Step-Step-Guide-Qualitative-Coding/dp/1138486876/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF8&qid=1543874247&sr=8-3&keywords=Philip+adu)
Views: 8786 Philip Adu
The analysis of narratives
 
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Examines the use of narratives in speech and in research analysis. Beginning with a look at the range of ways narratives might be analysed such as linguistic, structural and thematic. Attention is then turned to some of the functions of narrative. This was a lecture given to postgraduate (graduate) students at the University of Huddersfield as part of a course on Qualitative Data Analysis. To learn more about social research methods you might be interested in this new, inexpensive, postgraduate, distance learning course: MSc Social Research and Evaluation. The course is delivered entirely via the Internet. http://sre.hud.ac.uk/ Works referred to in the video include: Bury, M (2001) “Illness narratives: Fact or Fiction” Sociology of Health and Illness 23: 263-85 Cortazzi, M (1993) Narrative Analysis. London: Falmer Press. Denzin, N.K. (1989) Interpretive biography. Newbury Park, Calif., London: Sage. Labov, W. (1972) 'The transformation of experience in narrative syntax', in W. Labov (ed), Language in the inner city: Studies in the Black English vernacular. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press. pp. 354-396. Lieblich, A., Tuval-Mashiach, R. and Zilber, T. (1998) Narrative Research: Reading, Analysis and Interpretation. London: Sage. Mishler, E.G. (1986) Research Interviewing: Context and Narrative, Cambridge Mass.: Havard University Press Rhodes, C., and Brown, A.D. (2005) “Narrative, Organizations and Research”, International Journal of Management Research, 5: 167-88. Riessman, C.K. (1993) Narrative Analysis. Newbury Park, CA, London: Sage. Credits: Sounds and music: 'Fifth Avenue Stroll' from iLife Sound Effects, http://images.apple.com/legal/sla/docs/ilife09.pdf Image: Freizeitanlage Kräwinklerbrücke, Kräwinklerbrücke in Remscheid by Frank Vincentz, Wikimedia Commons, licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share Alike 3.0 Unported license.
Views: 33594 Graham R Gibbs
A Practical Guide to Qualitative Interviewing
 
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James gives practical hints and tips when conducting qualitative interviews, including how to design interview schedules and how to probe to maximize data collection.
Views: 1866 James Woodall
Fundamentals of Qualitative Research Methods: Scientific Rigor (Module 6)
 
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Qualitative research is a strategy for systematic collection, organization, and interpretation of phenomena that are difficult to measure quantitatively. Dr. Leslie Curry leads us through six modules covering essential topics in qualitative research, including what it is qualitative research and how to use the most common methods, in-depth interviews and focus groups. These videos are intended to enhance participants' capacity to conceptualize, design, and conduct qualitative research in the health sciences. Welcome to Module 6. Mays N, Pope C. Qualitative research: rigour and qualitative research. British Medical Journal 1995; 311:109-112. Barbour R. Checklists for improving rigour in qualitative research: a case for the tail wagging the dog? British Medical Journal 2001; 322:1115-1117. Learn more about Dr. Leslie Curry http://publichealth.yale.edu/people/leslie_curry.profile Learn more about the Yale Global Health Leadership Institute http://ghli.yale.edu
Views: 32781 YaleUniversity
Template analysis Part 1, Constructing the Template
 
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In ten sections here is a video interview with Prof. Nigel King about the qualitative data analysis method he has promoted and written about called Template Analysis. This is a form of thematic analysis where in order to analyse the data the researcher identifies or develops a number of themes or codes which summarise and join together some of the key ideas, actions, experiences and concepts from the data that is being analysed. Such themes, often called codes, are connected to sections of the text that exemplify them. The process of linking the title of a theme with a related chunk of text is called coding. In this interview, Nigel King describes the key stages of Template Analysis, how the themes are arranged into templates and how these templates are revised. In particular he discusses how these thematic ideas can be used to follow the development of your thinking about the data you are analysing and how they contribute to the final write-up of of your research. See: http://www2.hud.ac.uk/hhs/research/template_analysis/
Views: 9283 Graham R Gibbs
Template analysis Part 4, Analytic and Descriptive Coding
 
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In ten sections here is a video interview with Prof. Nigel King about the qualitative data analysis method he has promoted and written about called Template Analysis. This is a form of thematic analysis where in order to analyse the data the researcher identifies or develops a number of themes or codes which summarise and join together some of the key ideas, actions, experiences and concepts from the data that is being analysed. Such themes, often called codes, are connected to sections of the text that exemplify them. The process of linking the title of a theme with a related chunk of text is called coding. In this interview, Nigel King describes the key stages of Template Analysis, how the themes are arranged into templates and how these templates are revised. In particular he discusses how these thematic ideas can be used to follow the development of your thinking about the data you are analysing and how they contribute to the final write-up of of your research. See: http://www2.hud.ac.uk/hhs/research/template_analysis/
Views: 2803 Graham R Gibbs
Template analysis Part 7, How many themes?
 
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In ten sections here is a video interview with Prof. Nigel King about the qualitative data analysis method he has promoted and written about called Template Analysis. This is a form of thematic analysis where in order to analyse the data the researcher identifies or develops a number of themes or codes which summarise and join together some of the key ideas, actions, experiences and concepts from the data that is being analysed. Such themes, often called codes, are connected to sections of the text that exemplify them. The process of linking the title of a theme with a related chunk of text is called coding. In this interview, Nigel King describes the key stages of Template Analysis, how the themes are arranged into templates and how these templates are revised. In particular he discusses how these thematic ideas can be used to follow the development of your thinking about the data you are analysing and how they contribute to the final write-up of of your research. See: http://www2.hud.ac.uk/hhs/research/template_analysis/
Views: 1616 Graham R Gibbs
Fractal Analytics- Interview Experience, Suggestions and Tips
 
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Fractal Analytics is a global provider of predictive analytics and decision sciences, helping companies: (a) Understand, predict and shape consumer behavior through advanced analytics; (b) Improve effectiveness of marketing, pricing and supply chain management; (c) Harmonize data, tell visual stories and forecast business performance. Fractal serves Consumer Packaged Goods, Financial Services, Insurance, Retail, Technology, Life Science and Telecommunication industries. The candidate, Parag Saxena, is sharing her interview experience with Fractal Analytics in this clip. Visit www.placementboat.org for more information on placements, quizzes and type of questions asked during placement rounds. Subscribe our channel PB Videos to see more such videos on placements. Come sail with us.
Views: 11724 Placement Interview
Gunnar Carlsson Interview - Topological Data Analysis
 
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The show you’re about to hear is part of a series of shows recorded in San Francisco at the Artificial Intelligence Conference. My guest for this show is Gunnar Carlsson, professor emeritus of mathematics at Stanford University and president and co-founder of machine learning startup Ayasdi. Gunnar joined me after his session at the conference on “Topological data analysis as a framework for machine intelligence.” In our talk, we take a super deep dive on the mathematical underpinnings of TDA and its practical application through software. Nerd Alert! The notes for this show can be found at twimlai.com/talk/53 Subscribe! iTunes ➙ https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/this-week-in-machine-learning/id1116303051?mt=2 Soundcloud ➙ https://soundcloud.com/twiml Google Play ➙ http://bit.ly/2lrWlJZ Stitcher ➙ http://www.stitcher.com/s?fid=92079&refid=stpr RSS ➙ https://twimlai.com/feed Lets Connect! Twimlai.com ➙ https://twimlai.com/contact Twitter ➙ https://twitter.com/twimlai Facebook ➙ https://Facebook.com/Twimlai Medium ➙ https://medium.com/this-week-in-machine-learning-ai

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