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Social Media Best Practices Parade - Museums in Social Media
 
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Social Media Best Practice Parade Salone dei Dugento - Wednesday, February 19th Museums in Social Media Natalia Dudareva, Denmark Published Paper: http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/paper/museums-in-social-media/ What is the relevance of social media for marketing of arts and culture museums? Who are the virtual followers of their social media? Are they the same people who visit their physical locations or do they represent completely different groups of people? Arts and culture sector is actively seeking approaches to embrace the rapid development of web technologies, and thus it is crucial to have a clear understanding of the audiences addressed through these media. I will describe the users of museums’ social media, group them according to their motivations for following these pages, and explain how this knowledge can be useful for communication specialists of arts and culture museums. This research was conducted as a part of the master thesis and reached out to the Facebook followers of three arts and culture museums in Copenhagen: The National Gallery of Denmark, The National Museum of Denmark, and The David Collection. The quantitative survey described their Facebook followers and identified two main motivations that divided them. These are the desire to interact with the museums and the feelings of connectedness with them and their community. Five types of Facebook followers emerged from these motivations: ‘enthusiast’, ‘connected’, ‘contributor’, ‘interested’, and ‘informational’. ‘Enthusiast’ is the most active and engaged user, who is also actively visiting museums. ‘Connected’ is not as active in interaction, but also represents museum visitors, along with the ‘interested’. The ‘contributor’ and ‘informational’ types demonstrated a new development in the arts and culture sector. They describe Facebook users who follow museums in social media and get inspired by their updates, but at the same time do not visit museums often or do not feel motivated to do so. Although each of the relationship types places a high value on the information provided by museums in social media, this research suggests that social media communication is becoming a cultural experience of its own. This research demonstrates that social media provides opportunities both for strengthening the existing audience relationships and for establishing the new ones with those who are not active museum visitors. It identifies that many users take inspiration for the visits from the Facebook pages, and the most engaged social media followers also tend to be more active visitors. Nevertheless, social media is still not a universal tool. Even among those who follow museums on social media there is a large share of users that do not feel that Facebook is the most suitable place to interact with museums. Moreover, many do not feel confident sharing their opinions on this platform. Therefore, although social media offers possibilities to enhance interactions with the audiences, it should be closely integrated with the other elements of the marketing strategies, both on the web and offline. Thus it supplements the other online and offline elements of the marketing strategies by providing more opportunities for audience involvement and attracting new types of consumers.
Masterclass 4: How to tell a story through Graphic Novels - Frank Espinosa
 
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Masterclass 4: How to tell a story through Graphic Novels Frank Espinosa, Zum Zum iBooks With Frank Espinosa (Zum Zum iBooks), Giuseppe de Micheli (Opera di Santa Croce), Stefania Ricci (Museo Ferragamo) and Vanessa Petrucci (Scuola Internazionale di Comics). Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Basilica di Santa Croce Florence, Italy, February 21, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/masterclass-4-how-to-tell-a-story-through-graphic-novels/
Masterclass 1: People, Places and Things: how to create connections with audiences - Martha Ladly
 
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Workshop leaders: Stefania Chipa (Museums and the Web Florence), Alexandra M. Korey (FLOD-The Florentine), Martha Ladly (OCAD University). This practical workshop examines how cultural institutions can connect with their audiences through storytelling. The masterclass will address specific issues faced by cultural institutions today, using storytelling along with the latest digital tools and techniques, to ask questions and come up with potential answers. Each participant will bring a real question or problem to the masterclass; case studies and projects involving best practices and outcomes will create a framework for our discussions. Working in small groups, participants will be guided to develop innovative solutions and a plan to implement them, which will then be presented to and discussed with the larger group. This class is intended for museum directors, curators, marketing and communication professionals who work in digital departments, fundraisers, journalists and cultural commentators, and anyone interested in using digital tools to make cultural heritage more accessible to audiences.
Welcome to Museums and the Web Florence 2014 - Laura Longo - MWF2014
 
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Welcome to Museums and the Web Florence 2014, by Laura Longo, Musei Civici Fiorentini Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/?p=1129
Social Media Best Practice Parade - Palazzo Madama: Open, Connected, Social Museum
 
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Social Media Best Practice Parade Salone dei Dugento - Wednesday, February 19th Palazzo Madama: Open, Connected, Social Museum Carlotta Margarone, Italy Palazzo Madama (http://www.palazzomadamatorino.it/) is a historic building and UNESCO World Heritage Site located in the city center of Turin, Italy. Especially renowned for its baroque style, it also houses the Museo Civico d’Arte Antica, Turin’s municipal museum of ancient art. On a surface of over 4,000 sqm, an extensive collection of decorative and fine arts covering twenty centuries is displayed, starting from the Roman times to the present ages. Set up in 1861, the building was closed between 1988 and 2006 to ensure the refurbishment of the palace and the renewal of its outfitting. Starting from the reopening, the museum director and the staff have been working on a new model of museum, shifting common paradigms: the museum as a place opened to the public, a “temple” but also a “forum”, where people can contemplate the beauty of the art, but at the same time find stories, emotions and a feeling of warm welcoming. During the presentation we will describe and critically analyze how we have been working over the past 8 years on community building and audience development, underlying the importance of providing visitors with meaningful and accessible experiences, both online and onsite. Particularly, we will focus on the strategies adopted to engage new audiences and foster repeat visits: from the reconstruction of Italy’s first Senate chamber (2011) to the creation of a strong brand identity, to the development of an effective social media strategy. All these experiences contributed to the reinforcement of people’s trust into the institution and recently led to the successful completion of the first Italian crowdfunding project devoted to the arts: thanks to the contribution of 1600 citizens who donated more than 95.000 euros, in 2013 Palazzo Madama has enriched its heritage with a Meissen porcelain service, now displayed on the second floor. Given the opportunities offered by mobile technologies in terms of personalization and interpretation, in 2013 Palazzo Madama has also enriched its offer with the provision of a mobile guide optimised for tablet. The mobile application was developed by engineering firm TonicMinds (http://www.tonicminds.com/wp/) and was conceived as a tool aiming at facilitating visitors’ engagegement and meaning-making process. As to cater for different needs and agendas, it features not only a free exploration tour and a variety of thematic paths, but also two location-based mobile games: scanning the tags deployed in the museum environment, users can access multimedia content and explore the collections challenging themselves with mind-on riddles or delving into storytelling, dialoguing with virtual characters and following their own favourite story branch. After one year of in-depth evaluation and analysis, in the second part of our presentation we will share our results, trying to giving an answer to the following questions: to what extent can location-based mobile games help museums be engaging places? How the use of mobile games is influencing visitors’ experiences in terms of fun and learning? Finally, we will conclude investigating the role of mobile games in positively affecting citizens’ perceptions of museums as friendly institutions caring for people’s well being.
Smart technology for smart regeneration of cultural heritage - Starlight Vattano - MWF2014
 
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"Smart technology for smart regeneration of cultural heritage: Italian smart cities in comparison" by Starlight Vattano Smart City Tech Panel Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/paper/smart-technology-for-smart-regeneration-of-cultural-heritage-italian-smart-cities-in-comparison/
Masterclass 4: How to tell a story through Graphic Novels - Giuseppe de Micheli
 
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Masterclass 4: How to tell a story through Graphic Novels Giuseppe de Micheli, Opera di Santa Croce, Italy With Frank Espinosa (Zum Zum iBooks), Giuseppe de Micheli (Opera di Santa Croce), Stefania Ricci (Museo Ferragamo) and Vanessa Petrucci (Scuola Internazionale di Comics). Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Basilica di Santa Croce Florence, Italy, February 21, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/masterclass-4-how-to-tell-a-story-through-graphic-novels/
The Louvre's Nintendo 3DS Mobile Guide - Agnes Alfandari - MWF2014
 
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Forum 2: Museum Mobile Franco Niccolucci moderates a panel discussion with Agnes Alfandari (Louvre, Parigi), Paolo Paolini (Politecnico di Milano), Daria Hookk (State Ermitage Museum), and Alain Dupuy (Innovision). Chair: Franco Niccolucci Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/session/Forum-2-Museum-Mobile/
GLAM and the Free World - Cory Doctorow, UK - MWF2014
 
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Keynote: Cory Doctorow on "GLAM and the Free World" Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/glam-and-the-free-world/ The Galleries, Libraries, Archives and Museums (GLAM) sector has the power to show the world how it’s done on the Web, or to validate every venal, controlling, censoring urge Hollywood claims is normal. At stake: nothing less than the freedom of the planet.
Transmedia storytelling and cultural heritage interpretation : the CULTE project - Candice Chenu
 
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Transmedia storytelling and cultural heritage interpretation : the CULTE project Candice Chenu, France , Ronan German, France, Eric Gressier-Soudan, France, Florent Levillain, France, Isabelle Astic, France, Vincent Roirand, France Published Paper: http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/paper/transmedia-storytelling-and-cultural-heritage-interpretation-the-culte-project/ Paper 6: Storytelling and Transmedia Chair: Massimo Negri Massimo Negri moderates a session with Maria Teresa Natale, Vibeke Sorensen, Candice Chenu and Paolo Paolini Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 20, 2014
3D How To: Demystifying 3D Printing for Museum Practice - Rocco Furferi
 
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3D How To: Demystifying 3D Printing for Museum Practice Sala dei Dugento The past year has been filled with hype about how 3D printing will revolutionize manufacturing and change the way individuals interact with the world. The dizzying press coverage talks about everything being 3D printed from human body parts to weapons. What’s really going on with 3D printing? This session attempts to demystify this exciting technology and demonstrate how the 3D production ecosystem and can be valuable to museum practice. With participation from Miriam Langer (New Mexico Highlands University), Rocco Furferi (T-Vedo project), and Luciano Cantini (Kentsrapper).
Papers 3: Learning - The effects of learning style on user reactions to museum websites
 
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Papers 3: Learning Salone dei Cinquecento, Thursday, February 20, 2014 Helen Petrie, UK The effects of learning style on user reactions to museum websites Museum websites are becoming important learning resources, whether for students studying for a particular course (formal learning), or visitors interested in a particular exhibit following up on what they have seen (informal learning). Museum website developers are clearly endeavouring to provide information for a diverse range of learning situations, with interesting and easy to use presentation of material. One aspect of the situation that museum web developers may well not have considered is the differing “learning styles” of users of their websites. Learning style is a concept widely used in education, although it is not without controversy. But it is clear that some people prefer to learn in different ways, for example some people learn better with information presented as pictures and diagrams (Visual learners), whereas others learn better from reading text (Verbal learners). To investigate this area, we undertook a study of how people with different learning styles react to different kinds of material on museum websites. The Felder-Solomon model of learning styles was chosen for a number of reasons, firstly because it is well established in educational circles and secondly because it is easy to assess an individual’s learning style with a short free online questionnaire (available at: www.engr.ncsu.edu/learningstyles/ilsweb.html). The Felder-Solomon model proposes four dimensions of learning style: Visual/Verbal, Active/Reflective, Sensing/Intuitive and Sequential/Global. The Visual/Verbal dimension has been illustrated above. Active learners like to do things with information to learn and retain it, whereas Reflective learners prefer just to think about the information. Sensing learners like facts and well-established methods whereas Intuitive learners like abstractions and discovering relationships and possibilities. Finally, Sequential learners like to work in a linear sequence of logical steps, whereas Global learners like to see the big picture first and then fill in the details (for a full explanation of these dimensions, see http://www4.ncsu.edu/unity/lockers/users/f/felder/public/ILSdir/styles.htm). 146 university students were asked to undertake a number of typical information seeking tasks on two museum websites (British Museum – www.britishmuseum.org/ and Wellcome Collection – www.wellcomecollection.org/); the tasks were constructed so that they would lead the participants to pages with different kinds of materials which would suit people with different learning styles. After using each website, participants answered the Index of Learning Styles to assess where they are on the Felder-Solomon learning style dimensions and a set of questions that assessed their reactions both to the website as a whole for user experience and usability and to particular aspects of the presentation of information on the website. Results showed that people with different learning styles were significantly more attracted to different aspects of the websites. For example, Active participants preferred large images Visual participants preferred pages with lots of images, Sensing participants preferred concrete examples of concepts, whereas Intuitive participants preferred abstract discussions. The paper will consider the implications of these results and present guidelines for how museum websites can organize their website material to be attractive and useful to visitors with differing learning styles.
Papers 5: Crowdsourcing - Crowdsourcing descriptions of images on museum websites
 
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Thursday, February 20th Sala dei Dugento Papers 5: Crowdsourcing Helen Petrie, UK Papers 5: Crowdsourcing - Crowdsourcing descriptions of images on museum websites for visually impaired visitors: developing guidelines and examples of good practice Many museums are now providing thousands of images of items from their collections on their websites. Members of the public, researchers and students use these images for many purposes. However, people with visual impairments, who may be interested in using information from such images, are usually unable to do so, even though they can access other information on the website using text-to-speech technology. Providing descriptions of all the images on a museum website would be a very costly undertaking, so Museum Victoria has been exploring the use of crowdsourcing to solve this issue, asking sighted members of the public to describe images for visually impaired people. One important aspect of such an initiative is how to guide members of the public in describing images appropriately for visually impaired people. The Web Content Accessibility Guidelines (WCAG) developed by the World Wide Web Consortium advocate describing images on the Web for visually impaired Web users, but provide no information about what the content of such descriptions should actually be. Other information about how to describe images on the Web for visually impaired people is very scarce, and may not be applicable to museum images. Therefore we have undertaken a series of three studies to develop a set of guidelines and examples of good practice on image description for museum websites, working closely with visually impaired people and experts in visual impairment. Study 1 involved interviews with 17 visually impaired people (aged 29 – 80, 7 women and 10 men) about what kinds of information they would like about images on museum websites. Seven images from the Museum Victoria online collection were described to them and these provided concrete examples on which to base discussions. Analysis of these interviews formed the basis for the first version of a set of guidelines and examples of good practice for image description. One key finding from this study was that the visually impaired participants would like a “short” description to give them a brief overview of the image and a “long” description, for more detail. However, it was not clear how short a “short” description should be or how long a “long” description should be. In Study 2, 11 members of the public with no particular knowledge of visual impairment were asked to read the guidelines and examples of good practice and then provide short and long descriptions of four of the images from the Museum Victoria website (from Study 1). The participants were also asked to comment on the usefulness of the guidelines and examples. The guidelines and examples were also given to six experts in visual impairment for their comments and feedback. For Study 3, the descriptions created in Study 2 were analysed and a series of typical “short” and “long” descriptions of different lengths of the four images were created. These were read to eight of the visually impaired participants from Study 1 and discussed with them. Analysis of Studies 2 and 3 allowed the refinement of the guidelines and examples of good practice.
Forum 2: Museum Mobile - Paolo Galluzzi - Museo Galileo
 
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Forum 2: Museum Mobile Franco Niccolucci moderates a panel discussion with Agnes Alfandari (Louvre, Parigi), Paolo Paolini (Politecnico di Milano), Daria Hookk (State Ermitage Museum), and Alain Dupuy (Innovision). Chair: Franco Niccolucci Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/session/Forum-2-Museum-Mobile/
Masterclass 4: How to tell a story through Graphic Novels - Stefania Ricci
 
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Masterclass 4: How to tell a story through Graphic Novels Stefania Ricci, Museo Ferragamo, Italy With Frank Espinosa (Zum Zum iBooks), Giuseppe de Micheli (Opera di Santa Croce), Stefania Ricci (Museo Ferragamo) and Vanessa Petrucci (Scuola Internazionale di Comics).
Papers 7: Evaluation - User Modeling, Personalization and Adaptivity
 
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Papers 7: Evaluation Sala dei Dugento Thursday, February 20th User Modeling, Personalization and Adaptivity: Potential Keys to Success for FIBAC Project Ludovico Solima, Italy , Cosimo Birtolo, Italy, Simona Acanfora, Italy, Massimiliano Minei, Italy The research project named FIBAC (Fruizione Innovativa dei Beni Artistici e Culturali – Innovative Fruition of Cultural Heritage Assets) is an Italian research project, co-funded by the Italian Ministry of Education, University and Research and conducted by Poste Italiane, University of Salerno (Department of Information Engineering, Electrical Engineering and Applied Mathematics and CRMPA – Pure and Applied Mathematics Research Centre) and some small and medium Italian enterprises, i.e., Protom Group, Space, Meta, Nexsoft, and Lit Com. The project aims at making a technological system prototype able to create personalized visit paths in museums and art galleries and to deliver information about art objects specifically tailored to the user’s preferences and needs, following a narrative structure. In its general terms, this goal responds to the need of redefining the relationship between a museum and its visitors, increasingly centered on the user and mindful to his/her prior knowledge and experiences. In the framework of such a wide project, this paper intends to deepen three major aspects: user modeling, personalization and adaptivity. User modeling. The key issue to customize a service is the possibility to create a user model; FIBAC intends to do this offering reliable and meaningful services for the museum field.. For this purpose, a deep study, both at national and international level, has been carried out to analyse specific characteristics useful to create a user model that can be applied for customization, without redundancies and computationally manageable; in short, FIBAC wants to offer a user model that can outline cultural visitors’ profiles that are meaningful for the visit, both on the basis of information explicitly provided by the user, and on the basis of implicitly gathered data, by analysing a user’s behaviour or by importing information from external systems (e.g. social networks). Personalization. The personalization phase started from the study of the methodologies that analyse a user’s requests in natural language that adopt users’ profile, indoor tracking techniques and automatic art objects recognition. A further step consisted in improving the procedures for planning custom museum paths and, in close connection with them, for personalizing museum guided tours, according to a pull/push logic, which respectively take into consideration the user’s requests and the information suggested on the basis of the user’s profile and his/her location. Adaptivity. The whole outlined process is enhanced by repeated use; with factual and outright information directly referred to the user, these repeated uses make up the base for an adaptive system, that knows how to model itself according to users’ changes, progress, developments and afterthoughts both during the visit and afterwards, also in future visits to other museums. FIBAC is currently an ongoing project (it started in 2011 and it is expected to end in 2015); once closed, it will propose several innovative and distinctive aspects with respect to current available cultural heritage communication solutions. Particularly, it can be highlighted that current available solutions are mainly based on the use of ICT technologies (e.g. three-dimensional reconstructions, mobile devices, audio and video guides) not having a deep impact on a visitor’s experience as they leave him/her an essentially passive role. Differently, FIBAC’s innovative technological solutions aim to enhance the centrality of visitors and of their experiences through the interpretation of their personal needs.
How to Google Glass - Valerio Saffirio (Google Glass for Italian Sign Language LIS)
 
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How-to Google Glass With participation from Valerio Saffirio (Google Glass for Italian Sign Language LIS). Chair: Neal Stimler
Decision Support System...through Distributed Wireless Sensing - Federico Viani - MWF2014
 
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"Decision Support System for Museum Management through Distributed Wireless Sensing" by Federico Viani Smart City Tech Panel Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/decision-support-system-for-museum-management-through-distributed-wireless-sensing/
Paper 2: Smart Project Management - Mobile technologies & museums: a design perspective
 
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Paper 2: Papers 2: Smart Project Management Sala dei Dugento, Wednesday 19th February Mobile technologies and cultural institutions: a design perspective. Davide Spallazzo, Italy Published Paper: http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/paper/mobile-technologies-and-cultural-institutions-a-design-perspective/ Digital technologies and mobile technologies in particular are often pointed as a driver to achieve new visiting models but their employment in cultural heritage field is anything but straightforward. Despite the very long tradition of mobile interpretation in museums and the new potentials offered by smartphones and tablets (Scolari, Aguado, & Feijóo, 2012), the current visit models often rely on that enabled by audio guides, be it a guided tour or a free choice tour, soundtracks and soundbites in the definition by Proctor (Proctor, 2010). Furthermore, the introduction of digital technologies in museums and cultural institutions requires collaboration between professional with very different backgrounds such as curators, experts of education, programmers, graphic designers, just to name a few. The paper looks at this complex ecology from the point of view of a designer, trying to point out the main issues to be taken into account while designing a mobile experience for cultural institutions and a process that can be followed to achieve a final product from scratch. The user, the visitor, is the starting point of the design framework here proposed that regards as essential for a cultural visit to learn something, to engage (also socially) and to enjoy the visit time (ICOM, 2010). The design process here discussed combines two phases (Spallazzo, 2012). The first is based on analytic thinking and aims at defining the main problems the new project must face and to take important decisions about the mobile experience, such as the contents to be displayed, the learning model to be proposed, the level of social engagement to be pursued and so on. On the contrary, the second phase is based on synthetic thinking and aims at building up ideas relying on the results of the first phase and at proposing visit scenarios. Design thinking (Brown, 2009) is here employed to synthetize in experiences, coherent with the assumptions, an interesting story, mechanics of interaction (both with contents and users), cultural contents and the user. These process and framework have been applied in several projects and as a teaching tool for design students, achieving efficient and well targeted products and scenarios but what can be lost following the process is the visitor and the need to create for him something really beautiful, enjoyable and amusing, that is what design usually does. In few words this paper proposes and discusses a well-structured design framework to support the development of mobile experiences for cultural institutions but at the same time it warns designers not to take it too seriously and to pursue visitors’ engagement and enjoyment above all.
Paper 2: Smart Project Management - Discussion
 
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Papers 2: Smart Project Management Sala dei Dugento, Wednesday 19th February
Masterclass 3: How to Communicate Science - Michele Lanzinger
 
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Masterclass 3: How to Communicate Science Michele Lanzinger, MUSE - Museo delle Scienze di Trento ,Italy With Filippo Camerota (Museo Galileo), Michele Lanzinger (MUSE-Museo delle Scienze di Trento) and Dave Patten (The Science Museum London).
Forum 2: Museum Mobile - Paolo Paolini - Politecnico di Milano
 
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Forum 2: Museum Mobile Franco Niccolucci moderates a panel discussion with Agnes Alfandari (Louvre, Parigi), Paolo Paolini (Politecnico di Milano), Daria Hookk (State Ermitage Museum), and Alain Dupuy (Innovision). Chair: Franco Niccolucci Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/session/Forum-2-Museum-Mobile/
Papers 5: Crowdsourcing - Archeowiki: A project for the enhancement of archaeological heritage
 
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Thursday, February 20th Sala dei Dugento Papers 5: Crowdsourcing Archeowiki: when open source strategies incentive visitors presence in museum. A project for the enhancement of archaeological heritage in Lombardia. Anna Maria Antonini, Italia , Sara Chiesa, Italy, Dante Bartoli, Italy Published Paper: http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/paper/archeowiki-when-open-source-strategies-attract-visitors-presence-in-museums-a-project-for-the-enhancement-of-archaeological-heritage-in-lombardy-italy/ Open Source initiatives in cultural environment are emerging tools among educational and cultural institutions. This practice, indeed, is largely used by galleries, libraries, archives and museums in order to promote knowledge also implemented by a sharing process. Despite some controversial positions (Lovink, Metitieri, Lanier), affirming the free-access will lead to a detachment from the artwork, in 2008 the American Alliance of Museums identified this process as “Creative Renaissance” (http://download.aaslh.org/AASLH-Website-Resources/Museums+and+Society+2034.pdf) sparked by technological instrument and helpful tools for on-line promotion of cultural contents, also redrawing the human centrality within narrative and learning processes. Today, reaching a various target of visitors means spreading contents through largely utilized channels. Wikipedia is one of the most popular among them, also reflecting free circulation of cultural contents and free information.Involving people in this participative process means also to increase the number of real visitors in museums. That idea stimulated the project “Archeowiki”. The aim of this paper is to illustrate the project involving six museums in Lombardia, Wikimedia Italia and some social and cultural associations (working with disabled people, aged people and students), sponsored by a grant made available from Fondazione Cariplo. An initial lack of archaeological contents on Wikipedia pages – due to absence of digital-archaeological-experts able to contribute the archaeological sections and difficulties in finding relevant and reliable information on these topics – motivated the realization of this project. The project favoured the digitization of about a thousand of images and documents belonging to museums involved in Archeowiki. One of the action of project is the realization of “Wikigite” (WikiTrips). Wikigite consists of a guided tour through the museums’ archaeological collections (http://wlm.wikimedia.it/wiki/WikiGite), followed by a workshop hold by an archaeologist and a Wikipedia editor, with the aim of teaching to edit cultural contents on Wikipedia and, at the same time, to upgrade the free contents previously digitized by museums part of the project. Wikigite are currently ongoing, offering a didactical activity specifically designed for students, blind people and aged people. Wikipedia expert editors helped in creation of virtuous alphabetization process, by tutoring both teachers and students on how to co-write pages in Wikipedia, in particular on cultural subjects. Archeowiki is inspired to other projects with both a national and international scope such as GLAM-Wiki, Wiki Loves Monuments and Share you knowledge, but it is an experimental action in Lombardia, where the most innovative effect has been the positive reply and support of Sorpintendenza Archeologica della Lombardia, that demonstrated the awareness of changes in the cultural sector. Technological tools play a growing role in spread culture and educate people, opening new scenarios and new ways of co-working as virtuous collaborations between private and public institutions. Moreover, Archeowiki offers to associations, museums and on-line users, the opportunity to obtain an enhancement of the cultural heritage, offering visibility, fruition, education and know how, by working together. Wikipedia determines a higher and free visibility for public institution, those small and/or not well known, that can intensify the number of interested people in archaeological collections.
Papers 3: Learning - Sharing and reuse of museum objects in learning environments
 
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Papers 3: Learning Salone dei Cinquecento, Thursday, February 20, 2014 Vincenza Ferrara, Italy , Andrea Macchia, Italy, Sonia Sapia, Italy, Francesco Lella, Italy Published Paper: http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/paper/sharing-and-reuse-of-museum-objects-in-learning-environments/ In recent years many projects have developed online catalogues and repositories to manage and promote cultural heritage. After the massive digitalization of cultural heritage, open data modality suggests to rethink access to digital resources of museums and their use and reuse in different environments such as learning and tourism. Museums are rethinking who they are and what they can do to partner with schools and others to encourage interests and curiosity by citizens, teachers and students. Indeed the online accessibility of cultural materials and their sharing through technology can provide the use and reuse, in particularly, of museum information for developing learning, educational content and tourism application with full respect for copyright and related rights related to the aims to deploy museum community content as a means to enhance visit experience. Different projects have shown that digital resources and technology tools can be used as new teaching aids to develop a new learning environment, using collaborative and cooperative learning modality. However, the language and terminology adopted by museum staff to describe cultural heritage is, often. not easily accessible and understandable for the general public or for teachers and pupils. To solve this problem technologies can provide opportunities to rethink the implementation and presentation of contents. This paper presents MUSED, a user-centred framework designed by a partnership between museums and schools. A Platform has been developed to search, download and re-use digital resource of cultural heritage by teachers for their multimedia lessons . The Open data access , sharing museum resources and annotation tools were provided to encourage teachers and students to access and to know the cultural heritage. After access to reserved area of Website MUSED the information material was surfed online within the virtual paths offered by the Museums to track down useful objects to implement the contents in order to create a customized e-lessons, a container of explanatory panels and virtual museum objects relating to the subject matter. With the aid of specific software, each teacher will be able to make a hypertext with the support of images and information of the museum catalogues. After the lesson the teachers will bring students to museums so they will see objects that have already got to know, placed within the hypertext. In this way the students can implement the associative and experiential activities for the improvement of their cognitive abilities and their curiosity. In this way the museum object becomes a tool for teaching and educational environments will be created to improve engagement and student learning. On other side through annotation tools teachers and students will be able to integrate information of museum objects with content related to school subject so different information can increase digital museum resources. This approach may be very interesting not only to encourage museum visits and improve the relationship between museum and educational environment, but also to look for a new way to promote cultural heritage in other context such as lifelong learning and tourism.
Welcome to Museums and the Web Florence 2014 - Maurizio Fioravanti - MWF2014
 
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Welcome to Museums and the Web Florence 2014, by Maurizio Fioravanti, PIN Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/?p=1129
Masterclass 3: How to Communicate Science - Filippo Camerota
 
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Masterclass 3: How to Communicate Science Filippo Camerota, Museo Galigeo, Italy With Filippo Camerota (Museo Galileo), Michele Lanzinger (MUSE-Museo delle Scienze di Trento) and Dave Patten (The Science Museum London).
Towards a more vibrant and living museum sector - Nao Hayashi - MWF2014
 
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Forum 1: Open Museums Antonio Gomes da Costa (ECSITE) moderates a panel discussion with Luca Toschi (Università di Firenze), Alberto del Bimbo (Università di Firenze), Giorgia Turchetto (Fondazione Industria e Cultura), Paolo Galluzzi (Museo Galileo), and Nao Hayashi (UNESCO). Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/session/forum-1-open-museums/
Masterclass 2: How to develop a mobile tour -  Ilaria D'Uva
 
44:27
Masterclass 2: How to develop a mobile tour Ilaria D'Uva, D'Uva Workshop, Italy With James M. Bradburne (Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi), Ilaria D’Uva (D’Uva Workshop) and Nancy Proctor (Museums and the Web/Baltimore Museum of Art). Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Centro di Arte e Cultura Florence, Italy, February 21, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/masterclass-2-how-to-develop-a-mobile-tour/
Masterclass 5: Business models and (digital) tools for sustainability - Theodorus Meereboer
 
01:44:19
Masterclass 5: Relevant Forever: Business models and (digital) tools for sustainability Theodorus Meereboer, Netherlands How to engage your audience and stakeholders with innovative value creation by developing new propositions, products and processes. Participants will be more effective in involving their visitors and stakeholders for the social and societal innovation, in which their museum could take the lead, by building sustainable business models around these developments. Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Museo Stefano Bardini Florence, Italy, February 21, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/masterclass-5-relevant-forever-business-models-and-digital-tools-for-sustainability/
How to Google Glass - Neal Stimler
 
23:44
How-to Google Glass With participation from Valerio Saffirio (Google Glass for Italian Sign Language LIS). Chair: Neal Stimler
Papers 7: Evaluation - Un-supervised evaluation of virtual museums
 
15:51
Papers 7: Evaluation Sala dei Dugento Thursday, February 20th Un-supervised evaluation of virtual museums – the Uppåkra App as a case-study Sorin Hermon, Cyprus Evaluation of the museum experience is a key subject for research since many years. Many evaluations rely on simple or more complex questionnaires, analysis of behavioral patterns of visitors within museums / archaeological sites or direct interviews with visitors. Such evaluations aim at generally understand the visitors’ museum experience, their learning curvature, added cultural / entertainment value, etc. Recent developments in museum environments, and in particular the raise of a new kind of museums, namely the “virtual museums”, require a new approach to such evaluations. Within the framework of the EU-funded project V-MUST (Grant Agreement 270404) a research team from The Cyprus Institute and the University of Lund has begun a research aimed at defining innovative approaches and strategies for evaluating virtual museums in general, starting with apps for mobile devices. In particular, research focuses on measuring and characterizing the “noise” that occurs between the two ends of such a mobile applications: at one end being the team who made it and on the other the visitors who experience its content. The paper will present first results of this research and propose a framework for evaluating such apps. Moreover, the implications for defining and refining the definition of virtual museums will be discussed.
Masterclass 2: How to develop a mobile tour - James Bradburne
 
33:30
Masterclass 2: How to develop a mobile tour James Bradburne, Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi, Italy With James M. Bradburne (Fondazione Palazzo Strozzi), Ilaria D’Uva (D’Uva Workshop) and Nancy Proctor (Museums and the Web/Baltimore Museum of Art). Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Centro di Arte e Cultura Florence, Italy, February 21, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/masterclass-2-how-to-develop-a-mobile-tour/
Forum 2: Museum Mobile - Alain Dupuy - Innovision
 
15:34
Forum 2: Museum Mobile Franco Niccolucci moderates a panel discussion with Agnes Alfandari (Louvre, Parigi), Paolo Paolini (Politecnico di Milano), Daria Hookk (State Ermitage Museum), and Alain Dupuy (Innovision). Chair: Franco Niccolucci Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/session/Forum-2-Museum-Mobile/
Papers 7: Evaluation - Initial visitor models in a personalized museum guide
 
23:53
Papers 7: Evaluation Sala dei Dugento Thursday, February 20th Initial visitor models in a personalized museum guide Charles Callaway, Italy When dynamically creating personalized sets of multimedia presentations in cultural heritage contexts such as museums, it is important to know as much as possible about new visitors while being minimally intrusive. Visitors are usually not interested in answering personal questions or frequently interrupting their visit to give feedback, while approaches to creating models of visitors such as stereotyping produce little initial variation and thus homogenize rather than personalize their experience. More museums are including instrumented environments where physical sensors can continuously observe visitors, even before they begin using a system such as a museum guide. In these cases, it may be possible to create a user model by observing those users, and then using that data to predict either future behavior or a psychological profile. In the case of cultural heritage sites such as museums it is often useful to monitor the behavior of groups. Because group members arriving at museums already interact with each other before they even begin using a multimedia presentation system, if they have agreed to use a sensor-based museum guide it should be possible to create a more substantial user model based only on their initial group behavior before arriving at their first exhibit. Ethnographic studies have shown that the length and quality of conversation within small groups of visitors in a museum can be seen as a fundamental indicator of successful engagement. If the structure or other characteristics of initial group conversation is predictive of the effect of a system’s personalization of multimedia presentations, we can better choose which adaptations will produce more conversation and interaction, and will thus lead to more engagement with the presentations, the museum’s contents, and the museum as a whole. We illustrate this with a experiment based on the DramaTric system (Drama Tension Release by Inducing Conversation), an implemented mobile multimedia drama presentation system for groups. DramaTric is based on adaptive narration, and one of its uses of personalization is to select a variation in subsequent dramatic scenes depending on how much the group talked at the prior scene. DramaTric allows a group of visitors to move freely around a museum, while it produces a drama by coherently piecing together smaller drama segments. It consists of sensors both embedded in the museum and worn by the visitors, presentation devices, and software to implement dramatic presentations determined by sensor data. A recent experiment showed that the adaptations in DramaTric had a significant effect on the amount of group conversation at the conclusion of its drama presentations. While that experiment analyzed changes in the amount of conversation over time, we were then interested if the same data could show whether the amount of initial conversation was correlated with later conversation. In particular, we look at three potential claims: 1) does the amount of conversation at the very beginning of the visit predict later conversation; 2) does the amount of conversation at a given presentation predict conversation at the next presentation; and 3) does conversation during a presentation predict conversation immediately after a presentation.
Mobilizing the Smart City - Museum Professionals Respond to the keynote presentation by Rob Stein
 
43:09
"Mobilizing the Smart City" Museum professionals Lada Mitroshenkova (Borodino Museum), Claire Sussums (Museum of London) and mobile professionals Ilaria D’Uva (D’Uva Workshop), Daniele Jallà (Assessorato alla Cultura, Città di Torino), and Giovanna Barni (CoopCulture) respond to the keynote presentation by Rob Stein (Dallas Museum of Art). Chair: Nancy Proctor Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014
Introduction to Museums and the Web Florence 2014 - Laura Longo - MWF2014
 
15:06
Introduction to Museums and the Web Florence 2014 by Laura Longo, Musei Civici Fiorentini Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/?p=1129
Social Media Best Practices Parade - Invasioni Digitali / Digital Invasions
 
16:20
Social Media Best Practice Parade Salone dei Dugento - Wednesday, February 19th Invasioni Digitali / Digital Invasions - Co-Creation of Cultural Value Invasioni Digitali, Italy Communication in the digital context is more fragile than appears. Process requires sender and receiver using compatible technologies which evolve quickly, differently and continuously. Moreover, requires them to boast a similar mindset or the ability, the wisdom, the will to deeply understand each other. Which may prove difficult when we come to Cultural Heritage that is, by nature, highly intangible and thus leaves room for extremely personal ‘interpretations’. On the other side, it represents an invaluable asset to better define what a ‘cultural object’ is about, and deeply understand the way it is perceived by the audience. Engaging the audience in a closer relationship with the Cultural Heritage they are surrounded by may prove effective to co-create additional cultural value. Initiatives aimed at that can enable: – a better understanding of the communication issues affecting Cultural Heritage – an increased awareness of the needs and difficulties related to the protection and valorization of Cultural Heritage – a sense of ‘participation’, so to actively maintain and enhance the value of any cultural experience. According to the Country Brand Index, Italy tops global charts for tourism and culture. Yet, in the current economic crisis, the nation’s extraordinary patrimony is at risk, as, increasingly, museums and historical sites cannot afford to keep their doors open. The trend is stoking fears of a significant decline of the country’s cultural sector. However, a grassroots movement sweeping the peninsula is attempting to reverse this trend. ‘Invasioni Digitali’ (Digital Invasions) are mobs of people who support Italy’s museums and cultural heritage by ‘invading’ them and then documenting the experience on blogs and social media. Each ‘invasion’ is meant to create new forms of conversation about arts and culture, and to transform Italy’s heritage into something that is ‘open, welcoming and innovative. The Digital Invasion’ project is about co-creating and nurture cultural value through proactive participation of visitors into the museums’ communication life-cycle. It is characterized by a fully bottom-up approach, where people organize independently single events all around the country during a given time frame (the very first edition was held on april 20 – 28, 2013). Social and digital communication are key to the ‘invasions': ‘invaders’ are bloggers, archeology amateurs, photographers, Instagrammers, historians, communication experts, but also people with the most varied backgrounds. All of them boast a real passion for their country and its unique heritage, and own well established social media accounts which are extensively used during the ‘invasion’ to build up unique narrations and enable the most powerful storytelling experiences. Inspired by a contingency, Invasioni Digitali aims now to become a sort of ‘territorial lab’ for new social and digital communication products and models, and a tool to enhance both visitor’s experience and the museum/cultural site performance. In fact, digital media constitutes a challenge also to all the staff of museum, cultural institutions, organizations and businesses: the format of Digital Invasions also suits any staff member, arts professional, academics, as “co-creation of cultural value is something that each individual is called (and willing) to take part into”.
Mobile Summit - Mobile Book Sprint, Susan Chun
 
13:19
Mobile Book Sprint, Susan Chun What is it? How do we start? FAQs The MWF2014 program includes a special pre-conference day on 18 February at the Sant’Apollonia Auditorium, Via San Gallo, 25 for professionals and experts in mobile for the cultural sector. Commercial providers of mobile technology, content and experiences as well as museum and other cultural professionals specializing in mobile are invited to gather in Florence for a full day of collaborations to raise the quality and impact of mobile in our field. http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/mobile-summit/
Welcome to Museums and the Web Florence 2014 - Marco Bellandi - MWF2014
 
05:00
Welcome to Museums and the Web Florence 2014, by Marco Bellandi, Fondazione Ricerca e Innovazione Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/?p=1129
Heritage on the web: MIBAC projects - Rossella Caffo - MWF2014
 
27:04
"Heritage on the web: MIBAC projects," by Rossella Caffo Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/session/heritage-on-the-web-mibac-projects/
Multi environment and device framework... in smart cities - Gianpaolo D'Amico - MWF2014
 
20:04
Introduction to the Smart City Tech panel by Alain Dupuy, followed by "Multi environment and device framework for tourist experience in smart cities" by Gianpaolo D'Amico. Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 19th, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/multi-environment-and-device-framework-for-tourist-experience-in-smart-cities/
Culturally enhanced Smart City Services - Jens Bley - MWF2014
 
25:28
"Culturally enhanced Smart City Services" by Jens Bley Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/presentation-culturally-enhanced-smart-cities-services/
Mobilizing the Smart City - Rob Stein - MWF2014
 
34:18
"Mobilizing the Smart City," Rob Stein, Deputy Director, Dallas Museum of Art Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/connecting-the-dots-how-digital-methods-become-the-glue-that-binds-cultural-heritage-to-contemporary-society/
Masterclass 4: How to tell a story through Graphic Novels - Questions
 
27:14
With Frank Espinosa (Zum Zum iBooks), Giuseppe de Micheli (Opera di Santa Croce), Stefania Ricci (Museo Ferragamo) and Vanessa Petrucci (Scuola Internazionale di Comics). Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Basilica di Santa Croce Florence, Italy, February 21, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/masterclass-4-how-to-tell-a-story-through-graphic-novels/
Mobile Summit - Welcome & Introductions by Ilaria D'Uva and Nancy Proctor
 
08:41
Mobile Summit - Welcome & Introductions by Ilaria D'Uva and Nancy Proctor The MWF2014 program includes a special pre-conference day on 18 February at the Sant’Apollonia Auditorium, Via San Gallo, 25 for professionals and experts in mobile for the cultural sector. Commercial providers of mobile technology, content and experiences as well as museum and other cultural professionals specializing in mobile are invited to gather in Florence for a full day of collaborations to raise the quality and impact of mobile in our field. http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/mobile-summit/
Storytelling and Transmedia: AthenaPlus / Digital storytelling for DCH - Maria Teresa Natale
 
18:09
AthenaPlus / Digital storytelling for DCH – Innovative tools and services Maria Teresa Natale, Italy , Julien Brouillard, France http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/proposals/digital-storytelling-for-dch-innovative-tools-and-services/ Paper 6: Storytelling and Transmedia Chair: Massimo Negri Massimo Negri moderates a session with Maria Teresa Natale, Vibeke Sorensen, Candice Chenu and Paolo Paolini Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 20, 2014
Papers 7: Evaluation - Virtual Art Museums As An Educational Resource For Teaching
 
16:46
Papers 7: Evaluation Sala dei Dugento Thursday, February 20th Virtual Art Museums As An Educational Resource For Teaching And Learning Artistic Heritage Carmen Tejera, Spain This paper outlines the results of the research carried out in my doctoral thesis, which deals with virtual art museums from an educational approach. The study focuses on the educational web sites and their interactive learning activities, considered as a didactic resource for teaching and learning artistic heritage. The theoretical framework stems from an educational conception based on inquiry. It sets up three didactic models according to the methodology used: traditional, activist and investigative. These models have been designed for the context of formal learning, so the aim of this work is to apply this classification in the scope of virtual museums. A previous step in the investigation consists of stating the terms in order to delimit the object of study. Virtual museums have been classified in three categories according to their educational projection: informative, expositive and interactive. Informative museums show in their Educational Section (ES) the Presential Learning Activities (PLA) they offer in the physical museum. Expositive ones have an educational section with Downloadable Learning Materials (DLM) and a Multimedia Section (MS) with Expositive Multimedia Materials (EMM). Interactive museums hold an Educational Web Site (EWS) with Interactive Learning Activities (ILA), and they are the only ones that take advantage of the didactic possibilities of the internet, mixing online, multimedia and interactivity. 500 virtual museums showing their pages in Spanish or English have been visited and there have been found 84 interactive virtual art museums, whose educational web sites offer 388 interactive learning activities. Those museums have been classified into the three didactic models and it has been proposed a taxonomy of activities and tasks belonging to each model: Museums which show a traditional didactic model are characterized by a transmissive methodology and contents derived from Art history. Some of the activities are based upon academic contents such as tests, quizzes, crosswords, matching artists with their works, recognizing styles and decoding symbols and sounds. Museums with an activist didactic model bring a recurring and procedural learning based on Art history, by the means of descriptions and intentional explanations. Their activities emphasize retention of the image by puzzles or memory games, playing with artistic techniques, drawing or designing, literary and musical creativity, analyzing artistic elements such as colour, shape, size or material, and virtual visits in the form of videogame, guide visit or solving a mystery. Museums ascribed to an investigative model present problematization of the contents in order to achieve meaningful learning, so education prevails on technology. They offer activities to all educational levels and hold a section for teachers. Among these tasks, there are treatment information, problem solving, result communication and research. The study have shown a predominance of activist museums followed by traditional ones and a significant number of investigative museums, which led to the conclusion that the range of virtual art museums are adopting didactic principles in the development of their activities since an innovative standpoint, which shows a higher concern about the learning role of museums.
Forum 2: Museum Mobile - Daria Hookk - State Hermitage Museum
 
12:16
Forum 2: Museum Mobile Franco Niccolucci moderates a panel discussion with Agnes Alfandari (Louvre, Parigi), Paolo Paolini (Politecnico di Milano), Daria Hookk (State Ermitage Museum), and Alain Dupuy (Innovision). Chair: Franco Niccolucci Museums and the Web Florence 2014 Palazzo Vecchio, Salone dei Cinquecento Florence, Italy, February 18, 2014 http://mwf2014.museumsandtheweb.com/session/Forum-2-Museum-Mobile/
Papers 3: Learning - Intro Dave Patten
 
04:27
Papers 3: Learning Salone dei Cinquecento, Thursday, February 20, 2014
Paper 2: Smart Project Management - Measuring Culture Event by Event
 
20:04
Paper 2: Papers 2: Smart Project Management Sala dei Dugento, Wednesday 19th February Susan Chun Measuring Culture, Event by Event The story of the cultural landscape of a place can be told in many ways: some studies of a city’s cultural vitality quantify its cultural organizations, tally residents employed in creative professions, count funding for the arts, or measure audience participation in cultural activities. However, one rarely-used metric for measuring culture is the availability of the cultural events that citizens may enjoy. This paper presents the results of a pilot project, conducted in the Winter of 2012-13 in Los Angeles, California, aimed at prototyping a unique, real-time, interdisciplinary database of cultural events that can be analyzed and visualized by amount, location, type, price, and audience. No such database currently exists. Efforts to aggregate event information—almost always commercial and aimed at either ticket sales or the development of customer-facing calendaring systems—usually capture only a fraction of the events in a region. They are useful in helping consumers answer the question, “what shall we do tonight?” but less helpful in providing a picture of the scope, nature, and location of cultural production in a place. The implications of the research, which our team hopes to replicate in multiple cities in 2014, extend beyond the consumer to the adjacent fields of urban planning, arts policymaking, and tourism, among others. In addition, our findings, especially those focused on the sources of event information online, have important implications for cultural practitioners. Our presentation will highlight some relevant insights for museums about the nature of event information, and the ways in which it is shared, displayed, digested, and presented.

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